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NEWS
January 11, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday it has withdrawn its approval of further studies involving the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, a pioneering device once hailed as a breakthrough but later linked to strokes and other complications in patients who received it. The agency said it took the action because problems associated with the mechanical heart and its manufacturer, Symbion Inc. of Tempe, Ariz., were endangering patients.
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NEWS
January 12, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When famed Houston surgeon Michael E. DeBakey went to Congress in 1963 to peddle the notion of an artificial heart, he was warmly received by two key committee chairmen, Sen. Lister Hill and Rep. John E. Fogarty. Hill's father was a surgeon and had named him after the famous physician, Joseph Lister. Fogarty also had a deeply personal interest in cardiac research: He was slowly dying from heart disease.
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NEWS
January 12, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When famed Houston surgeon Michael E. DeBakey went to Congress in 1963 to peddle the notion of an artificial heart, he was warmly received by two key committee chairmen, Sen. Lister Hill and Rep. John E. Fogarty. Hill's father was a surgeon and had named him after the famous physician, Joseph Lister. Fogarty also had a deeply personal interest in cardiac research: He was slowly dying from heart disease.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday it has withdrawn its approval of further studies involving the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, a pioneering device once hailed as a breakthrough but later linked to strokes and other complications in patients who received it. The agency said it took the action because problems associated with the mechanical heart and its manufacturer, Symbion Inc. of Tempe, Ariz., were endangering patients.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | United Press International
The Jarvik-7 artificial heart probably will never be a satisfactory permanent implant because the infections it causes are unavoidable, researchers concluded Thursday. Doctors familiar with the air-driven pump called for a 30-day limit on using the Jarvik as a bridge to a human heart transplant, and one physician warned that future attempts at permanent transplantation "will only serve to further document the magnitude of the complications." But Dr.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Robert K. Jarvik, who once battled Washington to test the artificial heart, is fighting on another front. This time, it's a battle on Wall Street for control of Jarvik's company. Jarvik is chairman of Symbion Inc. of Salt Lake City, which makes the Jarvik-7 artificial heart and artificial ears. On Wednesday, he disclosed that he is opposed to an $8.8-million offer for control of Symbion by the New York City venture capital firm Warburg, Pincus Capital Co.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | Associated Press
Artificial heart implants can continue, but only with case-by-case government approval and under new monitoring and reporting restrictions, the Food and Drug Administration said today. The FDA adopted the recommendations of a government advisory panel which last month proposed that new restrictions be imposed because of a history of strokes and complications among the four patients who have received artificial hearts. The agency said it has advised Symbion Inc.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
In the first use of an artificial heart in California, a team of surgeons in San Diego has implanted a Jarvik-7 mechanical heart in an Escondido man whose transplanted human heart had failed. Randy Dunlap, 34, received the device at Sharp Memorial Hospital on Tuesday after his transplanted heart failed to support his circulation. Hospital officials said the device is to serve as a temporary "bridge" to keep Dunlap alive until another human heart can be found.
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Artificial heart implants must comply with new monitoring and reporting restrictions that allow them to continue only with case-by-case approval from the government, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. In adopting the recommendations of a government advisory panel, the FDA imposed the restrictions because of a history of strokes and other complications among patients who have received the controversial Jarvik-7 artificial heart.
NEWS
August 30, 1985 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
Doctors in Tucson implanted a Jarvik-7 artificial heart in a 25-year-old man Thursday to keep him alive while they search for a human heart for transplant. The recipient, Michael Drummond of Phoenix, was reported in critical but stable condition after five hours of surgery at the University of Arizona Medical Center. Drummond is the youngest person yet to receive the mechanical pump that is already sustaining three men in their 50s. Two other recipients have died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
In the first use of an artificial heart in California, a team of surgeons in San Diego has implanted a Jarvik-7 mechanical heart in the chest of an Escondido man whose transplanted human heart had failed. Randy Dunlap, 34, received the device at Sharp Memorial Hospital on Tuesday after his transplanted heart failed to support his circulation. Hospital officials said the device is to serve as a temporary "bridge" to keep Dunlap alive until another human heart can be found.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Robert Jarvik's offices at Symbion Inc. are a monument to Robert Jarvik. The walls are decorated with glossy magazine covers about the man-made heart that bears his name. There he is on Italian men's Vogue--hair tousled, crooked smile, hand curled around "the Jarvik." But next door, in a funky building owned by the University of Utah, a smudged display case traces the artificial heart's bloodline. A dozen crude prototypes line the cupboard.
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