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Symbionese Liberation Army

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a weed-choked lot in South-Central Los Angeles there is a single palm tree, the only surviving remnant of a fire that put an end to one of the most infamous shootouts in the city's history. On Tuesday, 20 years after the gun battle, only Florence Lishey paid tribute. Lishey had watched from her living room window across the street as, for two hours, police SWAT team members exchanged fire with six Symbionese Liberation Army members, the urban guerrillas who had kidnaped Patty Hearst.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
Culminating a case that has evoked history and strong emotions, former Symbionese Liberation Army member Sara Jane Olson was released from state prison Tuesday and cleared to serve supervised parole in Minnesota after completing a seven-year sentence for bank robbery and attempting to kill Los Angeles police officers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Tuesday issued a global gag order barring the defendant, lawyers and witnesses from commenting on any of his rulings in the 24-year-old Sara Jane Olson bombing conspiracy case--including the gag order itself. James M. Ideman's order also declares eight other areas off-limits for discussion anywhere in the world. They include "character, credibility, criminal record or reputation of any party, attorney or witness."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2008 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Kathleen Soliah, a former member of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army, was released on parole this week from a California women's prison after serving about six years behind bars for her role in a plot to kill Los Angeles police officers by blowing up their patrol cars. The white-haired convict, who has changed her name to Sara Jane Olson, had been sentenced to 12 years in prison. Like most California inmates, Soliah earned credit against her sentence for working while in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If prosecutors dredge up the history of the Symbionese Liberation Army at the trial of 1970s bomb-plot fugitive Sara Jane Olson, the defense will offer its own history lesson--of the Los Angeles Police Department's violent dealings with the radical group, defense attorneys said in court papers filed this week. Olson's attorneys, Shawn S. Chapman and J. Tony Serra, say in the court filings that Olson ran because she feared for her life. The lawyers will ask Superior Court Judge James M.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in 1975, they were revolutionaries--Teko and Yolanda--the gun-toting, rhetoric-spewing leaders of the notorious Symbionese Liberation Army. These college sweethearts out of Indiana helped kidnap heiress Patty Hearst, saw six of their comrades incinerated in an armed standoff with Los Angeles police, and led the FBI on one of the biggest, most publicized manhunts in U.S. history. Today, settled and gone gray, the former firebrands, Bill and Emily Harris, have become downright upright.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One caller swears he saw the Unabomber in line at K mart. Another is certain the bomber is a hermit who lives deep in the northern Sierra. And a third claims he is an acquaintance named "Curtis" who "knows a lot of government secrets" and likes to take his neighbors' dogs for walks. As they continue their search for the shadowy criminal dubbed the Unabomber, investigators are getting an extraordinary outpouring of help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
After more than 25 years on the run, James Kilgore -- one of America's most wanted fugitives -- was scheduled to fly home Wednesday to face murder charges, officials said. Kilgore, a former member of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army, is being extradited from South Africa after agreeing to plead guilty to second-degree murder for a killing committed in California in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Heiress Patty Hearst (whose 1974-75 ordeal with terrorists is recounted in a new film, "Patty Hearst"), telling Redbook magazine about her current state of mind: "I am proud--and I have a greater sense of self--for having survived. Why should I feel guilty? They (the Symbionese Liberation Army) kidnapped me ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Symbionese Liberation Army member James Kilgore, who dodged authorities on bomb and murder charges for decades, was sentenced Monday to 54 months in prison on federal explosives and passport fraud convictions. He pleaded guilty last year. Kilgore, 56, who was extradited from South Africa in 2002 after living there as a professor, was a member of the 1970s radical group that kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2006
May 17, 1974: A deadly gun battle broke out after hundreds of officers surrounded a suspected hide-out of the Symbionese Liberation Army in South Los Angeles. Six people inside the house were killed when the building erupted in flames, possibly from tear-gas canisters fired through the windows. In February, the SLA had kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst. In the chaotic aftermath of the shootout, some people thought she had been killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
Robert STONE hesitates to call himself a historian, although he does the historian's job, excavating facts from the remnants of modern memory. Yes, he majored in history at the University of Wisconsin, but his father, chair of the history department at Princeton University, was the real historian. Stone is our contemporary equivalent, a documentary filmmaker, and he has a particular fascination for the recent past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Symbionese Liberation Army member James Kilgore, who dodged authorities on bomb and murder charges for decades, was sentenced Monday to 54 months in prison on federal explosives and passport fraud convictions. He pleaded guilty last year. Kilgore, 56, who was extradited from South Africa in 2002 after living there as a professor, was a member of the 1970s radical group that kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
James Kilgore, one of the nation's most wanted fugitives for a quarter-century and the last of five former Symbionese Liberation Army members to face murder charges in a 28-year-old bank robbery killing, pleaded guilty Tuesday. Kilgore, 55, entered his plea -- to second-degree murder -- in a courtroom about a dozen miles from the suburban Sacramento bank where the SLA netted $15,000 in cash and Myrna Opsahl, 42, died from a shotgun blast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal court appearance was postponed Monday for James Kilgore, a former Symbionese Liberation Army member accused of evading bomb and murder charges for decades. The hearing -- moved to next week -- was to review whether lawyers are on pace for a March 4 trial. The former fugitive is accused of being part of the radical group that kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst. He faces federal charges of possessing a pipe bomb and using a false name to get a passport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
After more than 25 years on the run, James Kilgore -- one of America's most wanted fugitives -- was scheduled to fly home Wednesday to face murder charges, officials said. Kilgore, a former member of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army, is being extradited from South Africa after agreeing to plead guilty to second-degree murder for a killing committed in California in 1975.
NEWS
August 24, 1999 | Associated Press
A former Symbionese Liberation Army fugitive awaiting trial on murder conspiracy charges legally changed her name Monday to the one she lived under for more than 20 years before her arrest by the FBI in June. A court official allowed 52-year-old Kathleen Soliah to change her name to Sara Jane Olson. That was the name she took when she settled in Minnesota after fleeing California authorities. She is married to a doctor and they have several children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal court appearance was postponed Monday for James Kilgore, a former Symbionese Liberation Army member accused of evading bomb and murder charges for decades. The hearing -- moved to next week -- was to review whether lawyers are on pace for a March 4 trial. The former fugitive is accused of being part of the radical group that kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst. He faces federal charges of possessing a pipe bomb and using a false name to get a passport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2002 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
The state Board of Prison Terms ruled Wednesday that Sara Jane Olson, convicted last year in a failed bomb plot to kill Los Angeles Police Department officers, should serve 14 years for her crime. The former associate of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army will not be eligible for parole until at least 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge this week approved a hearing that could add years to the sentence of Sara Jane Olson, the radical-turned-suburban mother who is in prison for plotting to blow up Los Angeles police cars in 1975. Olson, a former Symbionese Liberation Army member, was sentenced to 20 years in January and is eligible for parole in 2005. But California law lets the state Board of Prison Terms reconsider sentences for crimes committed before 1977, when different sentencing guidelines prevailed.
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