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September 29, 2009 | Martin Rubin, Rubin is a critic and author of "Sarah Gertrude Millin: A South African Life."
Chicagoan Audrey Niffenegger, author of the blockbuster "The Time Traveler's Wife" (recently made into a movie), spends time each year in London, where she is a guide at the historic Highgate Cemetery. Its roster of famous remains includes those of Karl Marx, and while the author of "The Communist Manifesto" does not cast much of a shadow over Niffenegger's new novel, "Her Fearful Symmetry," there is indeed a new specter haunting (that part of) Europe: Elspeth Noblin. A recently deceased rare book dealer, Elspeth not only has a family crypt in the cemetery, but had lived in an apartment overlooking it, complete with private entrance and special key. Elspeth has left her home and all it entails to her twin nieces from Chicago, Julia and Valentina, daughters of her own identical twin, Edie, but Elspeth's presence -- and a lot more -- still lingers there.
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SCIENCE
December 10, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
What's in a face? David Perrett has spent his career trying to find out. The author of "In Your Face: The New Science of Human Attraction" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), Perrett is an experimental psychologist at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and head of its Perception Lab. Using computer graphics, Perrett's team tweaks faces on-screen to explore how they help us choose the best mates, whether you can trust a face, the cuteness factor in babies and what faces reveal about overall human health.
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SCIENCE
December 10, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
What's in a face? David Perrett has spent his career trying to find out. The author of "In Your Face: The New Science of Human Attraction" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), Perrett is an experimental psychologist at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and head of its Perception Lab. Using computer graphics, Perrett's team tweaks faces on-screen to explore how they help us choose the best mates, whether you can trust a face, the cuteness factor in babies and what faces reveal about overall human health.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2009 | Martin Rubin, Rubin is a critic and author of "Sarah Gertrude Millin: A South African Life."
Chicagoan Audrey Niffenegger, author of the blockbuster "The Time Traveler's Wife" (recently made into a movie), spends time each year in London, where she is a guide at the historic Highgate Cemetery. Its roster of famous remains includes those of Karl Marx, and while the author of "The Communist Manifesto" does not cast much of a shadow over Niffenegger's new novel, "Her Fearful Symmetry," there is indeed a new specter haunting (that part of) Europe: Elspeth Noblin. A recently deceased rare book dealer, Elspeth not only has a family crypt in the cemetery, but had lived in an apartment overlooking it, complete with private entrance and special key. Elspeth has left her home and all it entails to her twin nieces from Chicago, Julia and Valentina, daughters of her own identical twin, Edie, but Elspeth's presence -- and a lot more -- still lingers there.
SPORTS
June 23, 2001
Has anyone else noticed the calendar symmetry among Southern California sports teams? Seems as if every June the season ends for the Lakers, Dodgers and Angels. Herbert M. Schoenberg Tarzana
NEWS
May 24, 2009 | David Nakamura, Nakamura writes for the Washington Post.
And now, some numbers for Maki Kaji, the man who helped invent Sudoku: 1984 -- year he created the puzzle, which was based on an American game called Numbers Place. 35 -- seconds it took for him to come up with the game's Japanese name ("su" means number; "doku" means single). 0 -- trademarks that Kaji secured before his game was reproduced around the world. "Some friends said, 'Maki, you should have trademarked Sudoku. You could have been a millionaire,' " Kaji told a crowd of about 50 during a recent appearance at the Sakura Matsuri Japanese Street Festival in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008
With the world's tiger population sagging to fewer than 7,000, now's the time to learn about and preserve this rare species of big cat. The Discovery Science Center provides children ages 3 to 17 with a hands-on, high-tech window into the world of the Bengal tiger at Tigers: Tracking a Legend, an exhibit blending biology, ecology and natural history to tell the story of a tiger family in India's Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve.
MAGAZINE
January 25, 1987 | WILLIAM JORDAN, William Jordan is Long Beach-based science writer.
I was lying there one morning last October, somewhere between one-third and one-quarter conscious in the softening darkness. The first sounds of dawn were tinkling dimly in the distance as a mockingbird warmed his throat for the day's performance. Then, suddenly, I was bolt upright in bed like a stepped-on rake. The mockingbirds had gone back to regular hours.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE
Randy Thornhill first made his mark with research showing that female scorpion flies choose their mates based on the size of the "nuptial gifts"--dead insects and the like--with which males present them. It was the first field study to test the role of female choice in Darwin's theory of sexual selection. Later, Thornhill joined several other biologists in studying wild jungle fowl, the ancestors of domesticated chickens.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The great popularity of Morton Feldman's very slow, very minimal, very soft and exceedingly long late chamber works has been fueled by fine recordings that have been coming out during the last decade. One such recording is that of the trio "Crippled Symmetry" for flute, percussion and keyboards, released by members of the California EAR Unit in 1999. But hearing the score performed live by the EAR Unit Wednesday night at the Leo S.
NEWS
May 24, 2009 | David Nakamura, Nakamura writes for the Washington Post.
And now, some numbers for Maki Kaji, the man who helped invent Sudoku: 1984 -- year he created the puzzle, which was based on an American game called Numbers Place. 35 -- seconds it took for him to come up with the game's Japanese name ("su" means number; "doku" means single). 0 -- trademarks that Kaji secured before his game was reproduced around the world. "Some friends said, 'Maki, you should have trademarked Sudoku. You could have been a millionaire,' " Kaji told a crowd of about 50 during a recent appearance at the Sakura Matsuri Japanese Street Festival in Washington.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A Japanese American theorist whose work helped explain how the cosmos came into being and two Japanese theorists who predicted the existence of a family of exotic particles called quarks will share the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physics, the Swedish Nobel Foundation announced Tuesday. All three studied a curious but essential phenomenon known as broken symmetry, which helps to explain the behavior of matter on the smallest scale, where the everyday laws of physics seemingly break down or are ignored.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008
With the world's tiger population sagging to fewer than 7,000, now's the time to learn about and preserve this rare species of big cat. The Discovery Science Center provides children ages 3 to 17 with a hands-on, high-tech window into the world of the Bengal tiger at Tigers: Tracking a Legend, an exhibit blending biology, ecology and natural history to tell the story of a tiger family in India's Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve.
NEWS
February 16, 2006 | Cindy Chang, Special to The Times
WHEN he designed his dream house, Rudolf Schindler was faced with a thorny problem. The house was to be not just for him and his wife but also for another family, the Chaces. The two couples wanted to live semi-communally, socializing and entertaining together while maintaining their privacy. There would be one garage and one kitchen, but everything else had to come in pairs: two fireplaces, two grassy patios, two open-air sleeping porches.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The great popularity of Morton Feldman's very slow, very minimal, very soft and exceedingly long late chamber works has been fueled by fine recordings that have been coming out during the last decade. One such recording is that of the trio "Crippled Symmetry" for flute, percussion and keyboards, released by members of the California EAR Unit in 1999. But hearing the score performed live by the EAR Unit Wednesday night at the Leo S.
NEWS
January 11, 2002
Anyone who thinks that palindromists wander too far from the mainstream ("For 2002, a Word From Palindromists: Yay," Jan. 1) should keep in mind that the very first exchange within our species was delightfully symmetrical. He: "Madam, I'm Adam." She: "Eve." ROB CARROLL Lake Forest Let's change to the European date style, at least for February. Feb. 20 will be 20/02/2002. TIM MAHAR Manchester, TN
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | DAVID L. ULIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent Friday afternoon, Jonathan Rosen's Upper West Side apartment seems the most secular place in the world. In the kitchen, his 10 1/2-month-old daughter, Ariella, occupies a highchair, gumming strips of chicken. High up on a bookshelf, sandwiched between hardcovers by Saul Bellow, E.L. Doctorow and Isaac Bashevis Singer, stands a Michael Jordan nesting doll; across the room sits a Bruce Springsteen box set.
NEWS
January 11, 2002
Anyone who thinks that palindromists wander too far from the mainstream ("For 2002, a Word From Palindromists: Yay," Jan. 1) should keep in mind that the very first exchange within our species was delightfully symmetrical. He: "Madam, I'm Adam." She: "Eve." ROB CARROLL Lake Forest Let's change to the European date style, at least for February. Feb. 20 will be 20/02/2002. TIM MAHAR Manchester, TN
SPORTS
June 23, 2001
Has anyone else noticed the calendar symmetry among Southern California sports teams? Seems as if every June the season ends for the Lakers, Dodgers and Angels. Herbert M. Schoenberg Tarzana
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | DAVID L. ULIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent Friday afternoon, Jonathan Rosen's Upper West Side apartment seems the most secular place in the world. In the kitchen, his 10 1/2-month-old daughter, Ariella, occupies a highchair, gumming strips of chicken. High up on a bookshelf, sandwiched between hardcovers by Saul Bellow, E.L. Doctorow and Isaac Bashevis Singer, stands a Michael Jordan nesting doll; across the room sits a Bruce Springsteen box set.
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