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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2004
Well done, Steven Barrie-Anthony! His story about Salvation Army worker Terri Brown ["Her Gratitude Is Ringing True," Dec. 21] really put some humanity into what most people consider the droning background of life. That's the voice that has the potential to reveal your enemies to be sympathetic humans with their own stories, trials and tribulations. [Giving them such voice] could lead to ending wars. It's hard to hate that which you know intimately. Eruch Adams Arden, N.C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 19, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers were stunned Thursday to hear that Kobe Bryant had suffered a knee injury that will knock him out for six weeks. "It's shocking," said Nick Young.  "You've just got to somehow come together as a team and just try our best out there at this point. " Young will have to help fill in at point guard with Xavier Henry and Jodie Meeks, none necessarily with the skills for the job. Jordan Farmar (hamstring), Steve Blake (elbow) and Steve Nash (back) are also sidelined.  Farmar may be back in about a week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1989
Actor Chris Burke has Down's syndrome and does not suffer from it, as stated in a caption over Howard Rosenberg's Sept. 12 column. Such a cutline serves only to perpetuate both negative and "sympathetic" attitudes toward mentally/physically handicapped persons. MARIAN CURRINDER Washington
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012
A behind the scenes look at the process by which country music singer Chely Wright publicly came out as a lesbian to her family, the world and the conservative establishment of the Nashville music industry, "Chely Wright: Wish Me Away" presents a sympathetic, emotional portrait of a life at a pivotal transition. Though filmmakers Bobbie Birleffi and Beverly Kopf capture all the moments one would want to see in the process of Wright's coming out, it is the painfully raw video diaries shot by Wright herself - presented later to the filmmakers who had no idea their subject was making them - that provide the film with its emotional core and greatest insights.
MAGAZINE
June 7, 1992
Whether the Armenians' deaths were brought on by war or genocide will be debated for decades to come. It's time that Armenians living here bury the hatchet on the Turkish issue or return to now-independent Armenia, where their shouts of hatred might fall on more sympathetic ears. PHILLIP A. PILGRAM Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2007
Iam appalled at the article written by Randy Lewis suggesting that "American Idol" change its scheduled content within less than 24 hours to be sympathetic to the Virginia Tech killings ["A Missed Opportunity to Honor Victims," April 19]. Has he ever tried to learn a song with only hours of preparation, much less in order to compete in a competition? The kids on that show are working pretty darn hard to build careers for themselves, and how could the entire staff of a pretty lushly produced show shift gears to accommodate a headline news story for the sake of invoking sympathetic tears?
NEWS
January 26, 1992
The Times' sympathetic story on Leslie Silko ("Predicting a Revolt to Reclaim the Americas," Jan. 13) is yet another gushy article about the trendy rise in Europhobia and distrust of Western culture. The article's sympathetic description of Silko's book as "an angry indictment of the conquerors by the conquered, with a vengeful justice leveled at "European destroyers," its reference to a "white ruling class" and its prediction of "the end of all things European" seemed strangely familiar.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1987
Dynarski's remarks concerning Joe Stalin go a long way toward confirming my opinion that actors, in general, should confine their public utterance to the lines written for them. As to the "big break" he's waiting for, perhaps he can next give us a "sympathetic" portrayal of Stalin's only superior in mass murder, genocide and terror. Does he remember who that was? FRED SCIFERS Inglewood
NEWS
November 6, 1994
In the last two years, the "Charlie Rose" show on PBS has become nothing more than a propaganda platform for the Clinton Administration. Has anyone else noticed? Rose fills his guest list with Administration appointees, congressional Democrats, sympathetic media and Hollywood celebrities. When a conservative does appear, Rose surrounds him or her with Clinton apologists to dilute whatever points they are honestly trying to make. David McKay, Palm Desert
MAGAZINE
July 22, 1990 | JOHN JOHNSON and RONALD L. SOBLE, John Johnson and Ronald L. Soble, Times staff writers, are working on a book about the Menendez case for New American Library.
ON A MILD SUNDAY last summer, a string of "popping sounds" drifted through the lazy night air of Beverly Hills around 10 o'clock. "I didn't think anything of it," said Tom Zlotow, a neighbor who soon learned that the noises he'd heard from the house right behind his were echoes of the most sensational crime in the history of Beverly Hills. "I didn't even think it could be gunfire, especially around here."
SPORTS
April 13, 2012 | By Mark Medina
The lights dimmed down. The starters walked through player introductions. And then moments after the lights turned back on, the Lakers and Nuggets tipped off in what appeared to be an ordinary NBA game. There was one key difference, though. The Lakers didn't have their head coach patrolling the sideline. Mike Brown left before the start of the Lakers' 103-97 victory over Denver on Friday night for what the team called "personal reasons. " But his players hardly had much time to react to his sudden departure.
SPORTS
March 11, 2012 | By Mark Medina
Lakers Coach Mike Brown and Celtics Coach Doc Rivers face many of the same challenges this season. Both are dealing with an aging veteran roster. Both are coaching a team that faces uncertainty whether their core lineup will be broken up before the March 15 trade deadline. Neither team is hardly dominating their respective conferences. The Lakers (24-16) are fourth in the Western Conference, while Boston (21-18) reamains seventh in the East. But here's one difference: Rivers says he can't fathom having to handle what Brown's been dealt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Girls, girls, girls" - if the 2011 season had to wear a neon sign on its head, that is what it would say. Blame it on the "The Good Wife" or Lady Gaga or "Bridesmaids," but suddenly television went all gynocentric. It started in January, with the sight of Elizabeth McGovern, Penelope Wilton and Maggie Smith going head to head on the wonderful "Downton Abbey"; by the fall, all anyone was talking about was "The New Girl" and not just the Zooey Deschanel show but also the concept it stood for - the Pan Am gals, the Playboy bunnies, a double dip of Whitney Cummings ("Whitney," "2 Broke Girls")
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Yes, that's Woody Harrelson, one of Hollywood's true peace-and-love guys, playing misanthropic, murderous cop Dave Brown in "Rampart. " That his performance is so chillingly convincing, he credits largely to his reunion with "The Messenger" writer-director Oren Moverman. That he manages to evoke some shred of sympathy in the role, however, is all Harrelson. What was hard to reconcile in Dave? Some of the guy's behavior — when I read it, I just thought, "This is a terrible guy. " I just saw an … being a racist, not afraid to kill someone who doesn't necessarily deserve it — and the other thing is his strange behavior with his family.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
A longtime Cherokee tribal councilman has won the race for chief of the Oklahoma-based tribe, according to unofficial results released Tuesday - an encouraging development for so-called Cherokee Freedmen battling for tribal citizenship. The Freedmen, about 2,800 descendants of slaves who also claim Cherokee roots, have been embroiled in a legal battle with the tribe for decades concerning their tribal citizenship, which carries the right to vote and receive services, such as medical care at tribal clinics.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court appeared unusually sympathetic Tuesday to the plight of an Alabama death row inmate who could be executed because two lawyers handling his appeal had left their law firm without telling him. When a court clerk sent a letter to their prominent New York firm, Sullivan & Cromwell, advising the young lawyers that Cory Maples' initial appeal had been denied, it was returned marked: "Return to sender — left firm. " The 42-day deadline to appeal then expired. At that point, Alabama's state prosecutors and judges took a stiff stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Ever since Walt Disney began turning out feature-length animated films, scholars, theologians and journalists have plumbed the depths of the simple morality tales for deeper religious meanings and messages. Was Snow White's eating of the poison apple an allusion to the Fall in the Garden of Eden? When the puppet maker Geppetto was swallowed by a whale, was that a veiled reference to Jonah in Hebrew Scriptures? Were Jiminy Cricket's initials in "Pinocchio" a hidden reference to Jesus Christ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2011 | By Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
Murder charges against on-duty police officers — such as the one announced by Orange County prosecutors in the Fullerton beating case — are rarely filed, and successful prosecutions in such cases are almost unheard of in California. Legal experts said jurors who are naturally sympathetic toward law enforcement are not easily persuaded that an officer has committed the ultimate crime, even after seeing video of the death. Ira Salzman, who has represented police officers, said defense attorneys in Orange County will have the added benefit of jurors who look favorably toward law enforcement and can make a forceful argument that police had the legal right to use force against a non-complying suspect.
NATIONAL
September 14, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
He killed her, Joshua Stepp admitted. He slammed the face of his 10-month-old stepdaughter into a carpeted floor, roughed her up as he changed her diaper, stuffed wet toilet paper down her throat, and soon she was dead. But Stepp, a 28-year-old former Army infantryman who saw combat in Iraq, insists that he is not guilty of first-degree murder. His post-traumatic stress disorder left him incapable of premeditating the killing of tiny Cheyenne Yarley in November 2009, he and his lawyers say. Because of his severe PTSD, Stepp was not able to "form the specific intent to kill," his attorney Thomas Manning said.
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