Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSymphonies
IN THE NEWS

Symphonies

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Christopher Houlihan's quixotic six-city, six-Louis-Vierne-organ-symphony tour reached the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels on Thursday and Friday nights. It commemorates the 75th anniversary of the day - June 2, 1937 - that the blind French composer dropped dead at the Notre-Dame de Paris organ, just as he was finishing his 1,750th recital. No one, other than the occasional organ freak, pays much attention anymore to these gloomily gothic "symphonies" for solo organ, written between 1895 and 1930.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Richard S. Ginell
With some time to kill between performances of "Lucia di Lammermoor" at Los Angeles Opera (the last one is Sunday), the peripatetic James Conlon merely had to cross 1st Street in order to lead the first of three subscription concerts with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Thursday night. It's hardly news that Conlon seems to be everywhere these days, but it's still a phenomenon worth noting. Indeed, Conlon turned up at the pre-concert lecture and later spent several minutes talking to the audience in the main hall about one of his Recovered Voices subjects: the strange, sad and remarkable career of Erwin Schulhoff.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Benjamin Lees, an American composer who for more than half a century effectively strove to write classical music that was traditional yet idiosyncratic, has died. He was 86. Lees, who had been in declining health, died of heart failure May 31 at a hospital in Glen Cove, N.Y., said his brother, Mark. A week before his death, the composer had moved to the area from his home in Palm Springs to be near his daughter. While disdaining avant-garde fads in contemporary American music, Lees wrote compositions that were considered listenable and accessible.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Following directly on the heels of the potent performance of Verdi's Requiem by San Diego Opera on Thursday, the New West Symphony tackled this great work for chorus, orchestra and four vocal soloists. A requiem mass that is an opera in all but setting, Verdi's late score can easily take on different meanings in different contexts. These were very different contexts. In San Diego, the requiem was given the day after the 49-year-old company callously and inexplicably announced, without advance warning, that it would cease operations in less than a month despite no debt on the books.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Vincent Persichetti, head of the composition department at the Juilliard School of Music in New York City, died Thursday night at his home after what was reported as a brief illness. He was 72. Persichetti was the author of more than 150 works, including nine symphonies and numerous works for chorus, bands and solo instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2013
Relax body and soul while watching noted German pianist Christoph Eschenbach conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic in Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4. Known for being among the most romantic symphonies in the Russian repertoire, Symphony No. 4 will help kick off 2013 on just the right note. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., L.A. Fri. 8 p.m. Ticket prices vary. (323) 850-2000; http://www.laphil.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
Bruckner's Seventh Symphony introduces to recordings (Teldec 73243) the much-publicized union of veteran conductor Kurt Masur and the New York Philharmonic. Bruckner is a presumed Masur specialty since Masur, in his mid-60s, is a conductor of the "old school," i.e., central European, who has been tilling these fields all his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
You can never have too much Mahler, most Mahler freaks believe. We trust our faith but seldom test it. The massive symphonies and disquieting song cycles are musically and emotionally bold statements that remain special-occasion music, even with the composer having entered the standard repertory. A test did, however, occur at the beginning of this year with Gustavo Dudamel's Mahler Project, in which the conductor divided the nine numbered symphonies into cycles at Walt Disney Concert Hall and in Caracas performed by his two orchestras, the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Simón Bolívar Symphony.
NEWS
June 6, 1985 | JACK SMITH
I was torn between loyalties last Sunday--the third game between the Lakers and the Celtics on TV, and the final concert of the Highland Park Symphony Orchestra at Franklin High School Auditorium. The concert began at 3 o'clock. The game ended at about 3:05, and I couldn't tear myself away from it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Maestro Sidney Weiss is talking about the Glendale Symphony in terms that could apply equally well to the London Philharmonic or any other orchestra of the first rank. Saturday evening, the Glendale orchestra will close its 77th season with an all-Brahms program. And Weiss, its music director for the last four years, has nothing but praise for his musicians and their ambition as well as their talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
John Corigliano wrote his Symphony No. 1 in 1988 on a grand scale for an extravagant-sized orchestra. It is a multi-colored score containing a patchwork quilt of immense emotions. The composer didn't call it a war symphony, but that is what it is, an epic orchestral score for an epic tragedy, the AIDS epidemic. Audiences and orchestras, devastated by what the disease had wrought, understood. The symphony was needed, appreciated and widely played. The urgency of those times is receding into memory, and Corigliano's score is not so much heard any longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Italian conductor Daniele Gatti, about whom there has been much interest of late, may have been forced to cancel his appearance with the Vienna Philharmonic at Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall on Monday night due to an inflamed tendon, but he was replaced by an even bigger name, Lorin Maazel. The program of Schubert and Mahler symphonies remained the same. But nothing remained remotely the same. Maazel is a uniquely idiosyncratic interpreter and a uniquely practiced veteran musical manipulator.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS --  For Junya Watanabe, a collection is never about a single reference point or theme. It's about the work--rigorous technique--which evolves before our very eyes on the runway. The designer's powers were on full display Saturday morning at Paris Fashion Week when he presented an incredible lineup of what were essentially fabric assemblages-- careful constructions, collages and patchworks of lace, tulle, tweed, ribbon and fur, painstakingly put together and wholly elegant.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's multifaceted TchaikovskyFest has thus far weathered political incident. That is to say, nothing happened Friday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall to land performances of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto and Second Symphony on the front page or in the international spotlight. The concert, performed by the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela (sharing the festival with the L.A. Phil) and conducted by Gustavo Dudamel, did draw an assembly of demonstrators in front of Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
We have a vague notion of a Scandinavian sound as a kind of misty, mysterious Nordic noir. Strangeness is a giveaway. One musical thing might ultimately lead to another, but the landscape is alien. Trying to define an overall Baltic sound, on the other hand, is hopeless, given the variety of regions that border the Baltic Sea. The Los Angeles Philharmonic's program this past weekend touched on the four great northern Baltic coastal cities - Copenhagen, Stockholm, Helsinki and St. Petersburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By David Ng
When soprano Renée Fleming takes to MetLife  Stadium in New Jersey on Sunday to perform the national anthem at the Super Bowl, she will sing to music performed by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra. But the accompaniment will be a recording, not a live orchestral performance. The New Jersey Symphony confirmed Wednesday that it will provide a recording of "The Star-Spangled Banner" that will play as Fleming performs before the game. The soprano also will be joined by a 32-voice group from military choruses and choirs, according to a Wednesday report in the New York Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1999 | MASSIE RITSCH and MARTHA L. WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mastering classical music within the Hsieh family means practice--and lots of it. The two Hsieh children--Tiffany, 14, and Timothy, 10--spend hours every day practicing, just as each has done since before their fifth birthdays. But they have a lot further to go to catch up with their mother, Shirley Hsieh, who studied piano with top-ranking teachers for 25 years and is now a teacher herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES
It's easy to make a big impact in Saint-Saens' "Organ Symphony." Just make sure the organ and the orchestra in the last movement rock the hall. The real test is making the slow movement theme float. Which is what conductor Raymond Leppard and the Pacific Symphony did respectably in a three-part program Wednesday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The sensitivity began with the quiet opening measures and continued in a well-paced if cautious performance of the piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
It has been a number of years since the members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic pulled New Year's Eve duty, and none of them seem to be complaining about having the likes of Pink Martini, or this year, Sergio Mendes, take over at Walt Disney Concert Hall for the evening. Most orchestra musicians find a light-hearted holiday celebration a thankless chore when they'd rather be celebrating themselves. But the St. Louis Symphony does it differently, with music director David Robertson having turned New Year's Eve into a surprise party for the last seven years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Michael Miller
As records pressed in 1969 go, it's an obscure one - far from "Abbey Road" or "Let It Bleed. " But however many copies remain of it, two found their way recently into a quiet room in UC Irvine's music department. With one of the discs on the turntable, the needle touched down and crackled before a soaring baritone rang from the speakers. Seconds later, a full chorus joined, its harmonies vivid beneath the surface gravel. With the record sleeves spread out in front of them, James Dunning and Rita Major listened closely and sometimes smiled and nodded in recognition.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|