Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSymphony Towers
IN THE NEWS

Symphony Towers

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1988 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
The glamorous Symphony Towers office-hotel project, which at 34 floors is San Diego's highest structure and envelopes the city's refurbished Symphony Hall, has been purchased by a San Francisco general contractor that previously held a minority interest in the 1.1-million-square-foot project. Purchase price of the project, now under construction in downtown San Diego, was not disclosed Wednesday. The acquisition by Guy F. Atkinson Co.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 17, 1990 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another example of increased Japanese interest in San Diego real estate, Marriott Suites at Symphony Towers, the 264-room luxury hotel high-rise that adjoins San Diego's largest office building, has been sold to a Japanese development company for $41 million. Dia Pacific, a Honolulu-based subsidiary of Dia Kensetsu, Japan's third-largest condominium developer, acquired the Marriott Suites at Symphony Towers on Jan. 12, the same day that the 27-story hotel opened for business.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1987 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
The developers of the 1.1-million-square-foot Symphony Towers downtown received their $124-million construction loan Wednesday, clearing the way for the building of what will be San Diego's tallest office building. Charlton Raynd Development Co. received the two-year loan from a consortium of lending institutions led by California First Bank and its parent, Bank of Tokyo Ltd.
NEWS
September 14, 1989
In what may have been a whimsical nod to patrons who paid as much as $750 each to attend, Saturday's benefit concert for the San Diego Symphony opened with a drummy version of Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The state appeal court's San Diego branch has swapped its old downtown office for two floors in the Symphony Towers high-rise, and the new digs are very much uptown. Consider the mahogany bookcases. More than a mile--5,283 feet--of mahogany bookcases. If a particular book isn't in one of those bookcases, maybe it's in the dumbwaiter. Or in one of the eight justices' private bathrooms. Or perhaps computerized research in the library would be the way to go, anyway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1988 | JOSEPH MENN, Times Staff Writer
A partner in the hotel portion of the $143.5-million Symphony Towers project has pulled out, leaving the developer hunting for a replacement $7.5 million from its Eastern partners. Construction of the 12-story, $30-million Marriott Suites hotel was scheduled to begin this week, but Douglas Wilson, Charlton Raynd Development Co.'s managing partner, said Monday that the setback will cause a delay of 30 to 90 days. At California First Bank, which had made the $7.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1990 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another example of increased Japanese interest in San Diego real estate, Marriott Suites at Symphony Towers, the 264-room luxury hotel high-rise that adjoins San Diego's largest office building, has been sold to a Japanese development company for $41 million. Dia Pacific, a Honolulu-based subsidiary of Dia Kensetsu, Japan's third-largest condominium developer, acquired the Marriott Suites at Symphony Towers on Jan. 12, the same day that the 27-story hotel opened for business.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1989
David C. Sherwood has joined London & Edinburgh Investment as project director for Symphony Towers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1986
Trammell Crow Co. has announced plans to construct a 500,000-square-foot, 26-story office building across the street from its 23-story Imperial Bank Tower in downtown San Diego. Though details of the building are still tentative, Matt Spathas, a Trammell Crow marketing executive, said Friday that construction on the high-rise is expected to begin sometime next year, with completion expected in 1989.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Symphony Towers, a full-block project that includes San Diego's largest office building and a 264-room hotel being built around the San Diego Symphony's concert hall, was acquired Tuesday for $164 million by a group headed by a British real estate development and investment firm. A partnership controlled by London & Edinburgh Trust acquired the 1.1-million-square-foot project from Guy F. Atkinson Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The state appeal court's San Diego branch has swapped its old downtown office for two floors in the Symphony Towers high-rise, and the new digs are very much uptown. Consider the mahogany bookcases. More than a mile--5,283 feet--of mahogany bookcases. If a particular book isn't in one of those bookcases, maybe it's in the dumbwaiter. Or in one of the eight justices' private bathrooms. Or perhaps computerized research in the library would be the way to go, anyway.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1989
David C. Sherwood has joined London & Edinburgh Investment as project director for Symphony Towers.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | David Nelson
Dorene Whitney, the La Jolla socialite who has become known as one of the county's most efficient and successful volunteer fund-raisers, seems not to have absorbed the lessons of the "once-burned, once-learned" theory of experiential education.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
For an orchestra that nearly went belly up, there are no quick fixes. Indeed, "no quick fixes" was the constant refrain by San Diego Symphony officials when the orchestra faced collapse under financial and labor troubles that included a yearlong lockout of musicians. Today, halfway through its second post-lockout season, those words appear truer than ever. The orchestra is making progress, but it's slow.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Symphony Towers, a full-block project that includes San Diego's largest office building and a 264-room hotel being built around the San Diego Symphony's concert hall, was acquired Tuesday for $164 million by a group headed by a British real estate development and investment firm. A partnership controlled by London & Edinburgh Trust acquired the 1.1-million-square-foot project from Guy F. Atkinson Co.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Symphony Towers, a full-block project that includes San Diego's largest office building and a 264-room hotel being built around Symphony Hall, was acquired Tuesday for $164 million by a group headed by a British real estate development and investment firm. A partnership controlled by London & Edinburgh Trust acquired the 1.1-million-square-foot project from Guy F. Atkinson Co., a San Francisco general contracting firm that took it over from Charlton Raynd Development of San Diego in September.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Symphony Towers. The melodic name, given to the high-rise project when it was announced in 1985, seems to be perfectly in tune with the nearly completed, 34-story building on B Street between 7th and 8th avenues. What better way to describe the structure that has risen above and around Symphony Hall, home of the San Diego Symphony? Try AT&T. The symphony will perform in the grand hall at the bottom of San Diego's tallest high-rise, but it will be AT&T's logo up in lights on top of the building.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | David Nelson
Dorene Whitney, the La Jolla socialite who has become known as one of the county's most efficient and successful volunteer fund-raisers, seems not to have absorbed the lessons of the "once-burned, once-learned" theory of experiential education.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Symphony Towers. The melodic name, given to the high-rise project when it was announced in 1985, seems to be perfectly in tune with the nearly completed, 34-story building on B Street between 7th and 8th avenues. What better way to describe the structure that has risen above and around Symphony Hall, home of the San Diego Symphony? Try AT&T. The symphony will perform in the grand hall at the bottom of San Diego's tallest high-rise, but it will be AT&T's logo up in lights on top of the building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1988 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
The glamorous Symphony Towers office-hotel project, which at 34 floors is San Diego's highest structure and envelopes the city's refurbished Symphony Hall, has been purchased by a San Francisco general contractor that previously held a minority interest in the 1.1-million-square-foot project. Purchase price of the project, now under construction in downtown San Diego, was not disclosed Wednesday. The acquisition by Guy F. Atkinson Co.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|