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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985
I was quite interested by the letter from Lyle and Evelyn Davidson (May 11), "A Few of the Symptoms of Conservative Fever." As a companion piece, I suggest the following, "A Few of the Symptoms of Liberal Fever": --If you demonstrate against the death penalty for convicted murderers one day and the next day do volunteer work at an abortion clinic, you are on your way to being a liberal. --If you protest that liberal feminist Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro was unfairly treated for breaking a few "technical" campaign laws but think that conservative Congressman George Hansen of Idaho "got what he had coming" for violating the same campaign financing laws, you are on your way toward that left-of-center bent.
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SCIENCE
March 31, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Bariatric surgery did more to improve symptoms of diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol after three years than intensive treatment with drugs alone, according to new results from a closely watched clinical trial involving patients who were overweight or obese. Study participants who had gastric bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy also lost more weight, had better kidney function and saw greater improvements in their quality of life than their counterparts who did not go under the knife, researchers reported Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1989
This letter is in response to the article "No Fume Threat Found at School" (Orange County section, Feb. 25). Much of the information included in the article is inaccurate and incomplete. A significant number of students, teachers and therapists continue to experience symptoms due to carpet fumes. We believe that parents of the children enrolled in Plavan School, Fountain Valley, should be informed of the symptoms, which include headaches, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, gastrointestinal problems, skin rashes and menstrual irregularities/hormonal changes.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Starting in her 30s, Barbara Schulties began suffering from debilitating headaches, which she describes as "someone taking a hot poker to my eye. " Besides excruciating head pain, the Santa Cruz resident lists a host of accompanying symptoms: nausea, vomiting, dizziness, difficulty focusing and hypersensitivity to light, noise and even wind on her face. "I can't spell," she says, describing a typical headache. "It's very hard for me to visualize words. " Like 12% of people in the U.S., and 1 out of 3 women over a lifetime, Schulties suffers from migraine disorder, an inherited condition that affects the regulation of nerve signals in the brain.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Depression can look very different in men and women. And many of its hallmarks - rage, risk-taking, substance abuse and even workaholism - can hide in plain sight. Now researchers say that when these symptoms are factored into a diagnosis, the long-standing disparity between depression rates in men and women disappears. That conclusion overturns long-accepted statistics indicating that, over their lifetimes, women are 70% more likely to have major depression than men. In fact, when its symptoms are properly recognized in men, major depression may be even more common in men than in women, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal JAMA Psychiatry.
SPORTS
February 29, 2012 | By Mike Bresnahan
Kobe Bryant played against the Minnesota Timberwolves on Wednesday. Exactly how did it happen? He suffered a concussion Sunday in the All-Star game but his symptoms two days later were related to neck trauma, not a concussion, said Bryant's neurologist, Vern Williams . Williams held a brief news conference before Wednesday's tip-off to clarify his findings and detail Bryant's sometimes unsteady path after taking a hard foul from...
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Erin Brockovich has announced she'll be looking into an outbreak of Tourette's-like symptoms among a group of high school students in western New York, to see if they have any environmental causes. Around 15 girls at Le Roy High School have developed strange symptoms since last fall: uncontrollable verbal outbursts and physical twitches so debilitating that one student interviewed by ABC has to use a wheelchair .  New York Department of Health authorities looking into the matter reportedly found no sign of environmental causes or infectious agents.
NEWS
October 1, 1991
I want to commend Patrick Mott for his article "Living on the Edge" (Sept. 15). The article presented a realistic picture of the illness, life, and hope for treatment and cure for people with schizophrenia. As a faculty member at UCI Medical Center, I am involved in a longitudinal research study on schizophrenia. We are studying the lives, course of the illness and biochemical changes in brain chemistry of people with schizophrenia. People with schizophrenia constantly battle the stigma of their illness, rejection and misunderstanding by friends and family, in addition to the symptoms of the illness.
HEALTH
October 20, 2012
Concussions can have many symptoms, and they're not always obvious, says Dr. Tracy Zaslow of Children's Hospital Los Angeles. Here are some of the symptoms, which might show up immediately after an injury but also might appear in hours or even days. • Feeling dazed, dizzy or confused • Forgetting what happened around the time of the injury • Headache • Nausea or vomiting • Sensitivity to light or noise • Change in vision or hearing • Trouble concentrating, difficulty remembering, slowed thinking • Irritability, sadness or anxiety • Losing consciousness Even one or two of these symptoms, if occurring around sports practice, games or casual play, should raise the question of a potential concussion.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Heart attacks require emergency treatment. But too many Americans are arriving at a hospital for treatment later than is optimal, researchers said Monday. Experts advise calling 911 for an ambulance if symptoms suggestive of a heart attack do not improve within five minutes. But a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that the average patient arrived at the hospital about 2.6 hours after symptoms began and 11% arrived more than 12 hours after symptoms began.
SCIENCE
March 24, 2014
There is strong evidence that medical marijuana pills may reduce symptoms of spasticity and pain reported by multiple sclerosis patients, but little proof that smoking pot offers the same benefit, according to new alternative treatment guidelines released by the American Academy of Neurology. The guidelines on complementary and alternative medicine , or CAM, treatments for MS were published Monday in the journal Neurology and are among the first from a national medical organization to suggest that doctors might offer cannabis treatment to patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
The two California Department of Fish and Wildlife scientists charged with doing environmental work on the proposed Newhall Ranch development had a daunting task. They were to help review whether and how the largest residential development ever approved in Los Angeles County - 20,000 homes stretching across a bucolic valley - could be built without undue harm to the environment, protected species and Southern California's last major wild river, the Santa Clara. The project was controversial and dizzyingly complicated.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A gunman who killed one doctor and critically wounded another and a bystander on a Reno hospital campus left a typed letter and suicide notes at his California home indicating that he targeted a urology clinic after having “adverse symptoms” from surgery, Reno police said Thursday. Officials identified the shooter, who took his own life, as Alan Oliver Frazier, 51, of Lake Almanor, Calif. Officers also found firearms at his home, Reno Police Lt. William Rulla said at a news conference.
SPORTS
November 10, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Take away their leading scorer and starting goalie, and the Ducks still win. Forced to adapt through a Sunday scratch of acknowledged leader Ryan Getzlaf (upper-body injury) and a last-minute illness to goalie Jonas Hiller, the Ducks weathered being outshot by Pacific Division rival Vancouver to win, 3-1, at Honda Center. "You've got to be ready when you're called upon to give the team a solid chance to win the game," said rookie goalie Frederik Andersen, who found out he was starting for Hiller 30 minutes before the game and stopped 35 shots to improve to 6-0. GAME SUMMARY: Ducks 5, Canucks 1 Owning the most points (31)
OPINION
November 7, 2013 | By Wendy Orent
There is a subculture in America you may know little about. Its members are haunted by a slender, twisting, tick-borne germ known as Borrelia burgdorferi , the microbe responsible for Lyme disease, and they are trying desperately to warn us that we are all at risk of contracting a debilitating, chronic illness characterized by joint pain, fatigue, mood disorders and a long list of other symptoms. Arrayed against these true believers are most of the mainstream scientists who study B. burgdorferi . Although they acknowledge that Lyme disease is a genuine illness that humans can get from being bitten by infected ticks, and that those who are not treated promptly can develop worse symptoms, they don't believe that infection leads to a chronic condition.
OPINION
October 20, 2013 | By Michael P. Jones
I am a gastroenterologist. I research, diagnose and treat digestive disorders. Those disorders include heartburn, also known as acid reflux or, if you really want to scare the customers, gastroesophageal reflux disease. I am also a heartburn sufferer. Sometimes. I used to be a pretty frequent heartburn sufferer. A few years ago, when I was intent on being a "gastroenterologist's gastroenterologist," I was seeing lots of patients, competing for funding to do research and writing and presenting papers.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Mothers who feel depressed are more likely to have 5-year-olds who are overweight, are less likely to eat breakfast, and they sleep and play outdoors less, a study says, posing the possibility that depression leads to parenting practices with less active engagement. Scientists looked at 401 low-income mothers in New York City and their 5-year-old children; nearly a quarter of the mothers had depression symptoms. The children of women with moderate to severe symptoms were more like to be obese or overweight, while children of mildly depressed women were more likely to drink sweetened drinks and less likely to eat breakfast than the kids of mothers who were not depressed, the researchers wrote in the July-August issue of the journal Academic Pediatrics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
Major kudos to Dade Hayes on his piece on "drum therapy" ("Beating the Competition," Feb. 8). As a "good kid" growing up in Inglewood, I had "symptoms" that would now be classified as attention deficit disorder symptoms. My mother knew there was nothing wrong with me--I just finished my work early and was bored and chose to "disrupt the class" (my second-grade teacher's words). By starting me on the drums as a privilege, I not only found an outlet for my energy, but it built self-esteem as well.
OPINION
October 13, 2013 | By Ellie Herman
He was 15 years old but looked 12, a reedy, pale little guy with a mop of dark hair. When he stood in front of the class to tell his story, he was so nervous you could see his skinny legs trembling under his khakis. The drama class assignment was to tell a story about a minor life event that led to some new realization about the world - an assignment designed both to help the kids get over their shyness and to teach the meaning of the word "epiphany. " The "minor" life event the boy chose to relay was the time his father, addicted to meth and hallucinating, threw himself out a fourth-story window and died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
After they got married last year, Homaira and Jahan Hamid decided they would embark on the hajj pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia "as soon as possible," before parental duties began to crowd out their religious obligations. When the Northridge couple discovered that a mysterious and sometimes deadly virus had emerged in the desert kingdom, killing more than 40% of the people it was known to have infected, they briefly reconsidered. The hajj - which every able Muslim must attend at least once in their lives - annually draws to Mecca as many as 3 million people, all gathered together.
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