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Symptoms

NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Demi Moore isn't the first celebrity to be hospitalized with what has been described in numerous media reports as exhaustion, and she won't be the last. But is exhaustion a true medical condition, or a euphemism for something else? It can be the real deal, says Dr. Kent Shoji, an emergency room physician at Marina del Rey Hospital . Think of it as an umbrella condition for a number of possible symptoms that cause the body (and sometimes the mind) to become completely run down, so much so that it requires a trip to the doctor or the ER. "If you look at the body as a system," he says, "any type of stressors that someone has to compensate for can really affect the overall well-being and health of an individual.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
Major kudos to Dade Hayes on his piece on "drum therapy" ("Beating the Competition," Feb. 8). As a "good kid" growing up in Inglewood, I had "symptoms" that would now be classified as attention deficit disorder symptoms. My mother knew there was nothing wrong with me--I just finished my work early and was bored and chose to "disrupt the class" (my second-grade teacher's words). By starting me on the drums as a privilege, I not only found an outlet for my energy, but it built self-esteem as well.
OPINION
September 8, 1991
Re "Stress Found to Be Prime Suspect in Colds Mystery," front page, Aug. 29: Apparently in the 1940s, Frank Loesser anticipated modern science's recent findings of a connection between stress, frustration and the common cold when, in "Guys and Dolls," Adelaide lamented: "It sez here in this book . . . the average unmarried female . . . due to some long frustration may react with . . . symptoms . . . affecting the upper respiratory tract!...
NATIONAL
September 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A swine flu outbreak at Washington State University that is suspected of sickening at least 2,200 students may be tapering off, a campus health official said. Dr. Dennis Garcia said 40 to 50 students a day have reported flu symptoms this weekend. That's down from roughly 150 a day last week. Garcia noted that many students had gone home for the Labor Day weekend, but there are still signs the outbreak may have peaked.
SPORTS
February 29, 2012 | By Mark Medina
Three days after suffering a broken nose and a concussion, Lakers guard Kobe Bryant will play tonight against the Minnesota Timberwolves. Getting the OK to play was hardly an easy process. Bryant had to sucessfully complete numerous tests to prove he had no conscussion-related symptoms, including neurological, bicycle, Axon and treadmill tests as well as a game of two-on-two. But neurologist Vern Williams said Bryant "passed them all with flying colors. " Williams observed Bryant four times after a hard foul from Miami guard Dwyane Wade gave Bryant a broken nose and a concussion, including a visit less than an hour before the 7:30 p.m. tip time.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | PAULA VOORHEES, Paula Voorhees is a free-lance writer
Imagine that the skin on your hands has been slowly peeled off. Then imagine the raw tissue is exposed to the sun for hours. This is how Patty Dicker, 41, of Newport Beach describes the pain caused by fibromyalgia, an often-misdiagnosed and little-researched disease from which she has suffered for 11 years. Also called fibrositis, the affliction is most common to women (one male for every 10 female victims) and is one of the most prevalent, debilitating and painful forms of arthritis, afflicting an estimated 3 million people in the United States alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Comic actor John Ritter died on his daughter's 5th birthday in September 2003. The next day, his widow, actress Amy Yasbeck, told the girl that her dad's death was unavoidable. Since then, Yasbeck has come to believe the story she told their daughter Stella was wrong. "The doctors told it to me like I was 5 and I told it to her like she was 5," Yasbeck said in an interview with The Times. "The truth is, it's a lot more complicated and it's a lot more sad."
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on "Good Morning America" that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks.
HEALTH
November 21, 2005
Chromium is an essential trace mineral found in a variety of foods, including whole grains, cereals, spices (such as black pepper), broccoli, mushrooms, cheese, seafood and meat. In the body, it plays a role in metabolizing fats and carbohydrates and controlling blood levels of sugar. The body has a hard time absorbing chromium supplements in mineral form; it is absorbed more easily when it's bound to another molecule.
SCIENCE
September 5, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
President Kennedy's Addison's disease, which came to light only after his election in 1960, was most likely caused by a rare autoimmune disease, according to a Navy doctor who reviewed Kennedy's medical records. The disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2, or APS 2, also caused Kennedy's hypothyroidism, according to a report published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Hard though it is to believe these days -- when a celebrity's smallest sneeze is analyzed -- Kennedy's family and advisors were able to keep his medical history virtually secret.
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