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July 11, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Mothers who feel depressed are more likely to have 5-year-olds who are overweight, are less likely to eat breakfast, and they sleep and play outdoors less, a study says, posing the possibility that depression leads to parenting practices with less active engagement. Scientists looked at 401 low-income mothers in New York City and their 5-year-old children; nearly a quarter of the mothers had depression symptoms. The children of women with moderate to severe symptoms were more like to be obese or overweight, while children of mildly depressed women were more likely to drink sweetened drinks and less likely to eat breakfast than the kids of mothers who were not depressed, the researchers wrote in the July-August issue of the journal Academic Pediatrics.
September 8, 1991
Re "Stress Found to Be Prime Suspect in Colds Mystery," front page, Aug. 29: Apparently in the 1940s, Frank Loesser anticipated modern science's recent findings of a connection between stress, frustration and the common cold when, in "Guys and Dolls," Adelaide lamented: "It sez here in this book . . . the average unmarried female . . . due to some long frustration may react with . . . symptoms . . . affecting the upper respiratory tract!...
September 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A swine flu outbreak at Washington State University that is suspected of sickening at least 2,200 students may be tapering off, a campus health official said. Dr. Dennis Garcia said 40 to 50 students a day have reported flu symptoms this weekend. That's down from roughly 150 a day last week. Garcia noted that many students had gone home for the Labor Day weekend, but there are still signs the outbreak may have peaked.
February 29, 2012 | By Mark Medina
Three days after suffering a broken nose and a concussion, Lakers guard Kobe Bryant will play tonight against the Minnesota Timberwolves. Getting the OK to play was hardly an easy process. Bryant had to sucessfully complete numerous tests to prove he had no conscussion-related symptoms, including neurological, bicycle, Axon and treadmill tests as well as a game of two-on-two. But neurologist Vern Williams said Bryant "passed them all with flying colors. " Williams observed Bryant four times after a hard foul from Miami guard Dwyane Wade gave Bryant a broken nose and a concussion, including a visit less than an hour before the 7:30 p.m. tip time.
September 4, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Screaming at your teenagers to discipline them can make their behavior worse - even if you otherwise have a warm family relationship, researchers say. The effects were comparable to those in studies that focused on physical punishments, the researchers said. “From that we can infer that these results will last the same way that the effects of physical discipline do,” the lead researcher, Ming-Te Wang, an assistant professor of psychology in education at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a statement.
June 24, 1989 | PAULA VOORHEES, Paula Voorhees is a free-lance writer
Imagine that the skin on your hands has been slowly peeled off. Then imagine the raw tissue is exposed to the sun for hours. This is how Patty Dicker, 41, of Newport Beach describes the pain caused by fibromyalgia, an often-misdiagnosed and little-researched disease from which she has suffered for 11 years. Also called fibrositis, the affliction is most common to women (one male for every 10 female victims) and is one of the most prevalent, debilitating and painful forms of arthritis, afflicting an estimated 3 million people in the United States alone.
February 25, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Some women may have rejoiced at the news that hot flashes early in menopause might be a good thing for their hearts. Sufferers would like to think there could be a healthy upside. But the study published Thursday in the journal Menopause doesn't explain what might be causing the link, suggesting only an association. That means more research is needed. And in the meantime, some women are just plain stuck with hot flashes -- no matter when they occur. RELATED: Hot flashes at menopause may signal a lower risk for heart attacks and stroke But we're here for those women, with helpful advice from WomensHealth.
September 5, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
President Kennedy's Addison's disease, which came to light only after his election in 1960, was most likely caused by a rare autoimmune disease, according to a Navy doctor who reviewed Kennedy's medical records. The disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2, or APS 2, also caused Kennedy's hypothyroidism, according to a report published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Hard though it is to believe these days -- when a celebrity's smallest sneeze is analyzed -- Kennedy's family and advisors were able to keep his medical history virtually secret.
January 24, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Comic actor John Ritter died on his daughter's 5th birthday in September 2003. The next day, his widow, actress Amy Yasbeck, told the girl that her dad's death was unavoidable. Since then, Yasbeck has come to believe the story she told their daughter Stella was wrong. "The doctors told it to me like I was 5 and I told it to her like she was 5," Yasbeck said in an interview with The Times. "The truth is, it's a lot more complicated and it's a lot more sad."
September 24, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on "Good Morning America" that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks.
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