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MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
I'm a 32-year-old woman who lived at Synanon between the ages of 9 and 17 ("Life After Synanon," by Ted Rohrlich, March 29). My mother, a "square" with no substance problem herself, sent me and an older sister there because she was sold on the treatment and what Synanon stood for then. Growing up in the hills of Northern California was a treat. I remember having a lot of fun. But there were definitely scary downsides. Having a shaved head was not something I liked one bit, but the pictures I have still make people laugh.
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MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
I'm a 32-year-old woman who lived at Synanon between the ages of 9 and 17 ("Life After Synanon," by Ted Rohrlich, March 29). My mother, a "square" with no substance problem herself, sent me and an older sister there because she was sold on the treatment and what Synanon stood for then. Growing up in the hills of Northern California was a treat. I remember having a lot of fun. But there were definitely scary downsides. Having a shaved head was not something I liked one bit, but the pictures I have still make people laugh.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Dederich Sr., the founder of Synanon who was praised for his drug and alcohol rehabilitation results but later reviled for alleged mind control and violence, including conspiracy to murder a lawyer with a rattlesnake, has died. He was 83. Dederich, who started the controversial group in Santa Monica, died Friday in Visalia, Calif., of heart and lung failure. The crusty Synanon guru came to California as an alcoholic in the 1950s.
MAGAZINE
March 29, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, Ted Rohrlich is a Times staff writer
In the turbulence of the late 1960s and early 1970s, when the Vietnam War was at its peak and faith and society's institutions were becoming unmoored, a small drug and alcohol program in Santa Monica became an unlikely buoy in a storm. Synanon had been heralded by Time magazine for its supposed 80% success rate and touted by a politician as "a man-made miracle on the beach."
NEWS
August 1, 1989
Five present or former members of Synanon have pleaded guilty in Fresno federal court to destroying tape-recordings on which violence was mentioned. Each defendant could receive a maximum of one year in jail and be fined $20,000. The defendants originally faced a 22-count indictment returned by a federal grand jury in Washington in connection with an Internal Revenue Service audit aimed at determining whether Synanon was entitled to tax-exempt status as a church.
OPINION
March 16, 1997
The Times' March 4 report on the passing of Charles E. Dederich, my friend and colleague for over 35 years, is substantially correct. There were two Chuck Dederichs. One, over a 20-year period, founded and developed a revolutionary and effective method for treating criminal addicts; and the other manipulated the organization into a cultish form that eventually led to the original Synanon's downfall. Dederich's positive legacy, "the therapeutic community," lives on in the U.S. and around the world in the form of several thousand replications of his original Synanon concept and organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1985 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
Synanon founder Charles E. Dederich lost a bid Tuesday for an early end to the probation term imposed upon him in 1980 for his role in a conspiracy to kill Los Angeles attorney Paul Morantz by putting a rattlesnake in Morantz's mailbox. Dederich, 71, had asked that his five-year term be ended six months early so that he could once again participate in no-holds-barred group encounter sessions known as Synanon "games." But Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert R.
NEWS
October 2, 1985 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Nine current or former officials of the Synanon Foundation, founded as a drug and alcohol rehabilitation group, were indicted Tuesday on 22 counts of conspiracy, obstructing justice and perjury arising from an alleged attempt to falsely regain the foundation's tax-exempt status.
NEWS
December 28, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney filed a $10-million federal civil rights suit Friday against the county and half a dozen former and current county prosecutors, charging that he was driven from his job because of ties to Synanon.
MAGAZINE
March 29, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, Ted Rohrlich is a Times staff writer
In the turbulence of the late 1960s and early 1970s, when the Vietnam War was at its peak and faith and society's institutions were becoming unmoored, a small drug and alcohol program in Santa Monica became an unlikely buoy in a storm. Synanon had been heralded by Time magazine for its supposed 80% success rate and touted by a politician as "a man-made miracle on the beach."
OPINION
March 16, 1997
The Times' March 4 report on the passing of Charles E. Dederich, my friend and colleague for over 35 years, is substantially correct. There were two Chuck Dederichs. One, over a 20-year period, founded and developed a revolutionary and effective method for treating criminal addicts; and the other manipulated the organization into a cultish form that eventually led to the original Synanon's downfall. Dederich's positive legacy, "the therapeutic community," lives on in the U.S. and around the world in the form of several thousand replications of his original Synanon concept and organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Dederich Sr., the founder of Synanon who was praised for his drug and alcohol rehabilitation results but later reviled for alleged mind control and violence, including conspiracy to murder a lawyer with a rattlesnake, has died. He was 83. Dederich, who started the controversial group in Santa Monica, died Friday in Visalia, Calif., of heart and lung failure. The crusty Synanon guru came to California as an alcoholic in the 1950s.
NEWS
August 1, 1989
Five present or former members of Synanon have pleaded guilty in Fresno federal court to destroying tape-recordings on which violence was mentioned. Each defendant could receive a maximum of one year in jail and be fined $20,000. The defendants originally faced a 22-count indictment returned by a federal grand jury in Washington in connection with an Internal Revenue Service audit aimed at determining whether Synanon was entitled to tax-exempt status as a church.
NEWS
December 28, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney filed a $10-million federal civil rights suit Friday against the county and half a dozen former and current county prosecutors, charging that he was driven from his job because of ties to Synanon.
NEWS
October 2, 1985 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Nine current or former officials of the Synanon Foundation, founded as a drug and alcohol rehabilitation group, were indicted Tuesday on 22 counts of conspiracy, obstructing justice and perjury arising from an alleged attempt to falsely regain the foundation's tax-exempt status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1985 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
Synanon founder Charles E. Dederich lost a bid Tuesday for an early end to the probation term imposed upon him in 1980 for his role in a conspiracy to kill Los Angeles attorney Paul Morantz by putting a rattlesnake in Morantz's mailbox. Dederich, 71, had asked that his five-year term be ended six months early so that he could once again participate in no-holds-barred group encounter sessions known as Synanon "games." But Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert R.
NEWS
August 11, 1985
Synanon founder Charles Dederich, placed on five years' probation in 1980 for his role in a near-fatal rattlesnake attack on an attorney, was allowed to end his probation three weeks early by Superior Court Judge Robert Devich. Dederich, now 71, and two Synanon "Imperial Marines" pleaded no contest to conspiring to murder attorney Paul Morantz, who was bitten by a snake that had been placed in the mailbox of his Pacific Palisades home in 1978.
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