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Syncretism

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August 14, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN
"Everywhere in voodoo art, one universe abuts another," wrote Yale art historian Robert Farris Thompson about the sacred art of Haiti. African tribal customs and Catholic rituals have mingled and fused to breed vibrant, intriguing forms of expression in the former French colony. "A Haitian Heritage," at the Iturralde Gallery, gives an ample account of the country's visual richness.
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August 14, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN
"Everywhere in voodoo art, one universe abuts another," wrote Yale art historian Robert Farris Thompson about the sacred art of Haiti. African tribal customs and Catholic rituals have mingled and fused to breed vibrant, intriguing forms of expression in the former French colony. "A Haitian Heritage," at the Iturralde Gallery, gives an ample account of the country's visual richness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1989 | From Religious News Service
A Jewish group and an interfaith agency have criticized holiday cards that combine Christmas and Hanukkah symbols, saying that they are "an affront to Judaism, to Christianity and to serious interfaith relations." In a joint statement, the American Jewish Committee and the National Conference of Christians and Jews said that "true interreligious relations require respect for the integrity of distinct faiths and a repudiation of syncretism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2000
Re "Vatican Declares Catholicism Sole Path to Salvation," Sept. 6: I was born Catholic and will probably die a Catholic. I grew up with priests in my family and was taught by nuns for 12 years. The issues I've had with my church are numerous. But I've always felt that it was like a dysfunctional family, and you don't leave your family because it has problems. However, this last "declaration" by the Vatican, stating that other religions are "gravely deficient" and have "defects," is quite disturbing and, honestly, breaks my heart.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II gently placed a tiny, jewel-encrusted crown on the 18-inch-high figure before him, then lovingly draped a golden rosary on her hand. And with that simple act in a public square at noon Saturday, tens of thousands of Cubans erupted in unison: "Long live our Virgin of Charity! Long live our patron saint! Long live the queen of Cuba!"
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a magic word that Brazilians use to describe their talent for artful compromise. The word jeito translates roughly as a knack for solving problems, whether bureaucratic entanglements or social conflicts. It applies to the melding of religions that allows tens of millions of Brazilians to call themselves Roman Catholics while practicing rites of African origin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
In a look at Americans' beliefs, a new survey shows that 44% think the Bible, the Koran and the Book of Mormon express the same spiritual truths. The survey by the Barna Research Group also found that three-quarters of American adults believe in the Trinity, agree that "every person has a soul that will live forever, either in God's presence or absence," and reject the idea that only well-trained theological scholars can correctly interpret the Bible.
OPINION
October 19, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
I'm all for the separation of church and state. I believe that government endorsement of any particular religious sect or tradition has a corrosive effect on both the state and the faith in question. But I also think the attempt to separate religion from government is veering toward a foolish, parochial and ultimately impossible quest to separate religion from culture. Last week, the ACLU of Southern California's Peter Eliasberg argued the case of Salazar vs. Buono before the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | KERIN HOPE, Associated Press
On top of this 7,150-foot mountain in eastern Turkey a dozen gigantic stone heads guard the tomb of an ancient king who didn't want to be forgotten. Antiochus I, ruler of the small but strategically important Kommagene region in the 1st Century BC, built himself a showy funeral monument on the highest peak in his kingdom. He claimed descent from Alexander the Great, who conquered the district 300 years earlier, and from King Darius, the 5th-Century BC Persian monarch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2006 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
You didn't need to understand Spanish, much less the Inca language of Quechua, to grasp the ancient race and class conflicts played out in "Santiago." The haunting, dreamlike drama by Peru's provocative theater troupe Grupo Cultural Yuyachkani, opened Thursday at REDCAT. Ugly, unhealed wounds of colonial conquest and religious warfare are embodied onstage in the very image of the play's title character, known in English as St. James the Apostle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2007 | Greg Burk, Special to The Times
Urpin' cowboys blew the rent to sustain a worthy buzz. Two drunks barreled through the lobby holding each other semi-vertical. Ambulances screamed up when the curtain came down. It was all for the enduring glory of veteran road warriors the Reverend Horton Heat and Nashville Pussy, and it wasn't even New Year's Eve. Co-billed Hank Williams III was out sick, but a surprise fill-in plus steady fill-ups kept the party pumped at the Wiltern on Thursday.
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