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Syndrome X

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HEALTH
January 22, 2001 | PATRICIA KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joseph Dell'Alba says he wasn't looking for "eternal life." But the 76-year-old, semiretired businessman was looking for a better way to deal with his heart disease. For almost two decades he had been bouncing in and out of the hospital for bypass surgery, angioplasty and medication. Dell'Alba had gotten to the point where it was a struggle to walk the 200 feet to his mailbox in rural Pennsylvania.
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HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
At least 4% of American youths age 12 to 19 -- and 30% of those who are overweight -- meet the criteria for metabolic syndrome, a condition that puts them at increased risk for diabetes and heart disease as adults.
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HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
At least 4% of American youths age 12 to 19 -- and 30% of those who are overweight -- meet the criteria for metabolic syndrome, a condition that puts them at increased risk for diabetes and heart disease as adults.
HEALTH
January 22, 2001 | PATRICIA KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joseph Dell'Alba says he wasn't looking for "eternal life." But the 76-year-old, semiretired businessman was looking for a better way to deal with his heart disease. For almost two decades he had been bouncing in and out of the hospital for bypass surgery, angioplasty and medication. Dell'Alba had gotten to the point where it was a struggle to walk the 200 feet to his mailbox in rural Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Here's another way in which exercise may help a person avoid an early death: It fights insulin resistance syndrome, which may affect millions of American. "My guess is 10% to 25% of the population is insulin resistant," said Dr. Robert Sherwin, a professor at Yale School of Medicine and president-elect of the American Diabetes Assn. There are no statistics on exactly how many people have the condition, he said.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
For most researchers, a major genetic breakthrough is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Mark Skolnick has had three, two of them just within the past six months. He was a key player in the mid 1970s in the development of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), a crucial technology in identifying virtually every disease-causing gene isolated over the last decade.
NEWS
April 24, 2002 | LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overweight people who consume lots of dairy products may be less likely to develop risk factors for diabetes, a study shows. The findings, published in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., pertain to insulin resistance syndrome, a condition that can lead to diabetes and that afflicts 1 in 4 Americans. The body of an insulin-resistant person must produce an elevated level of insulin to control his or her blood sugar.
HEALTH
November 11, 2002
Education "Living Well." Discussion of nutrition, sexuality, hormones and skin care; for women in their 50s and beyond. Tuesday. Hoag Conference Center-Newport Beach, 1 Hoag Drive, Newport Beach. 6:30 p.m. Free. Reservations. (949) 574-6970. "The Pain Is Mainly in Your Brain." A lecture on the psychological factors that cause variability in pain sensation. Tuesday. UCLA, Neuropsychiatric Institute Auditorium, Los Angeles. 11 a.m.-noon. Free; parking $7. (310) 825-5300. "Diet and Diabetes."
NEWS
April 13, 2003 | Daniel Q. Haney, Associated Press Writer
Once a true medical oddity, children with adult diabetes are becoming commonplace. Doctors blame the twin evils of too much food and too little exercise, and fear a tragic upswing in disastrous complications as this overweight generation reaches adulthood. Boys and girls who range from chubby to hugely obese are being diagnosed in unprecedented numbers with type 2 diabetes. Most are barely in their teens; some are as young as 6.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
U.S. and Dutch researchers have discovered the defective gene that causes fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation. The report of the discovery, which will be published Friday in the journal Cell, is exciting to researchers because it offers for the first time the ability to perform prenatal screening for the disorder, and may eventually lead to the discovery of new ways to treat it. The syndrome affects one in every 1,250 males and one in every 2,000 females.
HEALTH
November 29, 1999 | CAROLE SUGARMAN, WASHINGTON POST
For the thousands of people sticking to high-protein diets this past Thanksgiving weekend, dinner could have been reduced to just one course: turkey. No stuffing, no candied yams, mashed potatoes or pumpkin pie. These popular high-protein regimes urge adherents to gobble up meat, cheese, nuts and other sources of protein while slashing such carbohydrates as breads, grains, fruits and vegetables. High-protein diets are "really, really hot," says Katherine Tallmadge, a Washington, D.C., dietitian.
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