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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1992
Yes, President Bush, there should be tax improvements. The first being your syntax. LARRY GORDON, Studio City
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
June 1, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
WHY READ literary criticism, you may well ask. With every boob and his bloggin' brother doing it, there's hardly time to read books and criticism. Best cut out the books altogether, for that matter, given the scorching pace of the Information Age. They take too long. The finest literary criticism, the stuff that lasts, prompts thought-provoking questions, hitherto unimagined points of view and context. It should never (we were always taught, ahem) overshadow its subject in histrionics, iconoclastic or otherwise.
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NEWS
October 12, 1986
I heartily endorse J. T. Taylor's excoriation (Viewers' Views, Sept. 21) of the atrocious grammar and syntax in radio and TV ads. I also am revolted by the crude unlettered Deep South corn-pone accent in which most commercials are couched. Though it has, thank goodness, lately been absent from the airwaves, "Git a li'l Glendale goin'--yer gonna be awraht!" always makes me cringe. Marvin H. Leaf, Malibu
BUSINESS
September 3, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
High in the Hollywood Hills, Leonardo DiCaprio, Ione Skye and Jennifer Tilly sipped drinks and played poker a few days before the Emmys. The actors were gathered at a $10-million mansion to raise money for charity. But they were also lending their star appeal to Olevia. Olevia, a little-known brand of high-definition television sets, could benefit from the celebrity interest. During the next several months, its maker, Syntax-Brillian Corp. of Tempe, Ariz.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1988
The first time I heard the phrase "employee leasing" I mistakenly thought the term was "employee leashing." But after reading "For Lease: Human Beings" (Job Market section, Sept. 18) I am not so sure my first interpretation was incorrect. I agree with the criticisms voiced in the article; but I also see that this type of employment is yet another way to circumvent pay equity, child care and parental leave, workplace issues that have only recently been discovered by corporate America and politicians.
BOOKS
June 1, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
WHY READ literary criticism, you may well ask. With every boob and his bloggin' brother doing it, there's hardly time to read books and criticism. Best cut out the books altogether, for that matter, given the scorching pace of the Information Age. They take too long. The finest literary criticism, the stuff that lasts, prompts thought-provoking questions, hitherto unimagined points of view and context. It should never (we were always taught, ahem) overshadow its subject in histrionics, iconoclastic or otherwise.
OPINION
July 24, 1994
A Times editorial (July 11) cites 601 uses of the meaningless term high profile to date this year in just one major newspaper. Why stop there? Other high-profile circumlocutions abound both on paper and in speech. Have you noticed that every change has now become a sea change ? How many sea changers even recognize the origin of this phrase in "The Tempest"? While hooked on watching the O.J. Simpson preliminary hearing, I noticed that a jarringly high number of questions, from both the defense and prosecution, began with the useless phrase with respect to . "With respect to the second glove, where was it found?"
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a kind of prose that begins in poetry, or at least in the musical spectrum of language. James Joyce and Malcolm Lowry were two of this century's greatest practitioners of this hybrid art. James Baldwin was another. There is something of the ambition of each of these men, with a dab of the poet Anne Sexton thrown in, in the mixture that is Jeanne Wilmot's first book of stories, "Dirt Angel." And at times, "Dirt Angel" feels more like a collection of New York tone poems than of stories, with their elegant adjectives and inverted syntax.
OPINION
August 28, 2006 | Gustavo Arellano, GUSTAVO ARELLANO is a staff writer with OC Weekly, where he writes the "¡Ask a Mexican!" column.
'SO YOU'RE THE Mexican who doesn't speak good Spanish," the Univision Radio producer sneered as we discussed whether I should appear on his show. Wow. My "¡Ask a Mexican!" celebrity star is no brighter than gaffer level, yet rumors and whispers about my personal life already buzz around town. In this case, the mudslingers are right.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | KRISTINE MCKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"People come to our film expecting some kind of true crime story but that's not what we were attempting to do," said 30-year-old filmmaker Joe Berlinger of the award-winning documentary "Brother's Keeper."
OPINION
August 28, 2006 | Gustavo Arellano, GUSTAVO ARELLANO is a staff writer with OC Weekly, where he writes the "¡Ask a Mexican!" column.
'SO YOU'RE THE Mexican who doesn't speak good Spanish," the Univision Radio producer sneered as we discussed whether I should appear on his show. Wow. My "¡Ask a Mexican!" celebrity star is no brighter than gaffer level, yet rumors and whispers about my personal life already buzz around town. In this case, the mudslingers are right.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a kind of prose that begins in poetry, or at least in the musical spectrum of language. James Joyce and Malcolm Lowry were two of this century's greatest practitioners of this hybrid art. James Baldwin was another. There is something of the ambition of each of these men, with a dab of the poet Anne Sexton thrown in, in the mixture that is Jeanne Wilmot's first book of stories, "Dirt Angel." And at times, "Dirt Angel" feels more like a collection of New York tone poems than of stories, with their elegant adjectives and inverted syntax.
OPINION
July 24, 1994
A Times editorial (July 11) cites 601 uses of the meaningless term high profile to date this year in just one major newspaper. Why stop there? Other high-profile circumlocutions abound both on paper and in speech. Have you noticed that every change has now become a sea change ? How many sea changers even recognize the origin of this phrase in "The Tempest"? While hooked on watching the O.J. Simpson preliminary hearing, I noticed that a jarringly high number of questions, from both the defense and prosecution, began with the useless phrase with respect to . "With respect to the second glove, where was it found?"
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Mario Vargas Llosa's wife, Patricia, was angry with him for a whole year. For one of Latin America's two greatest novelists to throw himself into a bloody campaign to become president of Peru, she argued, was to sacrifice both his art and his family. Surely, he was only in it for the excitement, for the notion of writing a great novel--not on paper, but in real life. Having argued, though, she turned wholeheartedly to helping him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1992
Yes, President Bush, there should be tax improvements. The first being your syntax. LARRY GORDON, Studio City
BUSINESS
October 2, 1988
The first time I heard the phrase "employee leasing" I mistakenly thought the term was "employee leashing." But after reading "For Lease: Human Beings" (Job Market section, Sept. 18) I am not so sure my first interpretation was incorrect. I agree with the criticisms voiced in the article; but I also see that this type of employment is yet another way to circumvent pay equity, child care and parental leave, workplace issues that have only recently been discovered by corporate America and politicians.
NEWS
February 3, 1985 | Jack Smith
Just before leaving so abruptly, I published here a letter from a photographic studio in Paris, offering its services to Jerry Poppink, a local publicist, who had sent it on to me because he thought it was amusing. I did too--amusing as an example of the difficulties of English for anyone trying to write it from a French-English dictionary, as its author, one L. Hunziker, evidently had. I did not mean to make fun of either L. or M. Hunziker. I admired M.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
"E ntertainment Tonight" will air its 2,000th show on Friday. Although thumped by critics since it debuted on Sept. 14, 1981, the syndicated program has survived. Entertainment reporters are now as common on TV as weather reporters, in part because of "ET," which has remained television's leading news show devoted solely to the entertainment industry. Last September, at the start of its eighth season, "ET" introduced a new format, with glitzier graphics, strobe-light pacing and two new features--its opening Inside Story and the ET Insider, a gossip-column-style commentary by co-star John Tesh.
NEWS
October 12, 1986
I heartily endorse J. T. Taylor's excoriation (Viewers' Views, Sept. 21) of the atrocious grammar and syntax in radio and TV ads. I also am revolted by the crude unlettered Deep South corn-pone accent in which most commercials are couched. Though it has, thank goodness, lately been absent from the airwaves, "Git a li'l Glendale goin'--yer gonna be awraht!" always makes me cringe. Marvin H. Leaf, Malibu
BOOKS
May 12, 1985 | KEN FUNSTON, Funsten is a free-lance editor. and
For better or worse, it's been labeled "language-centered" writing, though that tendency, which various poets and creative verbalists share today, might be better understood if we called it "writing-centered." An attitude toward constructing writing is what unites the current practitioners, and that descends from certain modernist grandparents, the Russian Formalists, an active movement of literary critics between 1915 and 1930.
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