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Synthetic Fuels

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BUSINESS
December 26, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is both a great success and a colossal failure. Rising like a mirage from the barren North Dakota prairie, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant is one of the most noteworthy remnants of the frantic era that followed the Arab oil embargo, when the United States spent millions of dollars to develop alternative energy sources. The Great Plains plant showed that the country could produce natural gas on a commercial scale from the West's vast supply of coal.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
A B-52 bomber took off from here Friday with all eight of its engines running on synthetic fuel, the first time that a U.S. military aircraft has flown without the kerosene formula that has been used since the advent of the jets. The nearly six-hour flight of the lumbering Stratofortress went off without a hitch, Air Force officials said, lifting prospects for the use of alternative fuel by the military and commercial airlines as they grapple with the high price of crude oil.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
A B-52 bomber took off from here Friday with all eight of its engines running on synthetic fuel, the first time that a U.S. military aircraft has flown without the kerosene formula that has been used since the advent of the jets. The nearly six-hour flight of the lumbering Stratofortress went off without a hitch, Air Force officials said, lifting prospects for the use of alternative fuel by the military and commercial airlines as they grapple with the high price of crude oil.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Marriott International Inc.'s third-quarter profit rose 2% as the largest U.S. lodging company used tax credits from its synthetic-fuel business to make up for a drop in hotel profit. Net income was $103 million, or 41 cents a share. Hotel profit fell 12% even as Marriott opened 7,100 rooms, and revenue rose 3.4% to $2.37 billion. Marriott shares fell 9 cents to $28.31 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1988 | MARK LAWRENCE, Times Staff Writer
The Energy Department, taking a short-term loss of more than $1 billion, announced Friday that it will sell a synthetic fuel plant it helped build in the wake of the energy crisis of the late 1970s. Basin Electric Power Cooperative, based in Bismarck, N.D., agreed to buy the Great Plains coal gasification plant in nearby Beulah for an estimated $600 million spread out over the next 21 years, including about $115 million in immediate payments--far short of the $1.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1985 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Twenty months ago, when synthetic fuels programs were still politically popular, Los Angeles-based Unocal had ambitious plans to extract crude oil from Colorado shale deposits--and the Synthetic Fuels Corp. seemed ready to pay for them. The quasi-governmental corporation tentatively promised Unocal $2.7 billion in price supports for the tens of thousands of barrels of oil that Unocal intended to extract each day from shale ore in a proposed second stage of its plant in Parachute Creek, Colo.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1985 | Associated Press
A House subcommittee, trying to "cut our losses," voted Wednesday to abolish the Synthetic Fuels Corp. and establish a sharply trimmed synthetic fuel program in the Energy Department. If the 5-year-old corporation awards no more money, as much as $6.2 billion could revert to the Treasury. "If you're looking for ways to save money down the road, this is an easy one," said Rep. Mike Synar (D-Okla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
Meredith Lanz says he nearly "jumped for joy" two weeks ago when he saw President Bush on television promoting the use of methanol to fuel cars as one way to clean up the nation's air. Lanz drives an unexceptional-looking 1983 Ford Escort that runs only on methanol, an odorless, colorless liquid made from natural gas or coal. Widespread use of this "cleaner" fuel, state and federal officials say, could reduce smog levels in Southern California by up to 15%. "Maybe now I'll be able to find more fuel pumps," Lanz said.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1985
The New York-based oil company said it will sell the stock of the Signal Hill-based company to Air Products & Chemicals of Allentown, Pa., for an undisclosed price. Texaco acquired the unit when it purchased Los Angeles-based Getty Oil last year. The synfuels company employs 140 and recovers methane from 11 landfills; six are in California.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is both a great success and a colossal failure. Rising like a mirage from the barren North Dakota prairie, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant is one of the most noteworthy remnants of the frantic era that followed the Arab oil embargo, when the United States spent millions of dollars to develop alternative energy sources. The Great Plains plant showed that the country could produce natural gas on a commercial scale from the West's vast supply of coal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
Meredith Lanz says he nearly "jumped for joy" two weeks ago when he saw President Bush on television promoting the use of methanol to fuel cars as one way to clean up the nation's air. Lanz drives an unexceptional-looking 1983 Ford Escort that runs only on methanol, an odorless, colorless liquid made from natural gas or coal. Widespread use of this "cleaner" fuel, state and federal officials say, could reduce smog levels in Southern California by up to 15%. "Maybe now I'll be able to find more fuel pumps," Lanz said.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1988 | MARK LAWRENCE, Times Staff Writer
The Energy Department, taking a short-term loss of more than $1 billion, announced Friday that it will sell a synthetic fuel plant it helped build in the wake of the energy crisis of the late 1970s. Basin Electric Power Cooperative, based in Bismarck, N.D., agreed to buy the Great Plains coal gasification plant in nearby Beulah for an estimated $600 million spread out over the next 21 years, including about $115 million in immediate payments--far short of the $1.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1985 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Twenty months ago, when synthetic fuels programs were still politically popular, Los Angeles-based Unocal had ambitious plans to extract crude oil from Colorado shale deposits--and the Synthetic Fuels Corp. seemed ready to pay for them. The quasi-governmental corporation tentatively promised Unocal $2.7 billion in price supports for the tens of thousands of barrels of oil that Unocal intended to extract each day from shale ore in a proposed second stage of its plant in Parachute Creek, Colo.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1985
The New York-based oil company said it will sell the stock of the Signal Hill-based company to Air Products & Chemicals of Allentown, Pa., for an undisclosed price. Texaco acquired the unit when it purchased Los Angeles-based Getty Oil last year. The synfuels company employs 140 and recovers methane from 11 landfills; six are in California.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Marriott International Inc.'s third-quarter profit rose 2% as the largest U.S. lodging company used tax credits from its synthetic-fuel business to make up for a drop in hotel profit. Net income was $103 million, or 41 cents a share. Hotel profit fell 12% even as Marriott opened 7,100 rooms, and revenue rose 3.4% to $2.37 billion. Marriott shares fell 9 cents to $28.31 on the NYSE.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1985 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine is a Times editorial writer.
Wise governments, like prudent individuals, hope for the best but prepare for the worst. That's the reason we have things like police and fire departments, unemployment compensation and an army and navy. And it's why we used to have a synthetic fuels development program. Not any more. Congress and the Reagan Administration, influenced by the present oil glut and the softness of world oil prices, are managing between them to abdicate the federal responsibility in this area.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1985
By voice vote, the 42-member House Energy and Commerce Committee approved a bill to abolish the $20-billion synthetic fuels program in 90 days and take back most of the $7.9 billion that it still has for subsidizing projects to convert coal and shale to liquid and gas fuels. With approval by the Energy Committee, the legislation now moves to the House Banking Committee, which shares jurisdiction over the synthetic fuels program.
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