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Syntroleum Corp

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BUSINESS
October 22, 1998 | (Bloomberg News)
Syntroleum Corp. shares rose 13% Wednesday after Chrysler Corp. said it will join an effort to develop sulfur-free diesel fuel from natural gas using Syntroleum technology. The shares rose $1.38 to $11.88. Syntroleum's stock is down a third since shares began trading Aug. 10 on Nasdaq after its merger with SLH Corp. Low crude prices have prompted oil companies to cut back on capital expenditures needed to implement Syntroleum's technology.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 1998 | (Bloomberg News)
Syntroleum Corp. shares rose 13% Wednesday after Chrysler Corp. said it will join an effort to develop sulfur-free diesel fuel from natural gas using Syntroleum technology. The shares rose $1.38 to $11.88. Syntroleum's stock is down a third since shares began trading Aug. 10 on Nasdaq after its merger with SLH Corp. Low crude prices have prompted oil companies to cut back on capital expenditures needed to implement Syntroleum's technology.
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BUSINESS
June 26, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, and Syntroleum Corp. formed a joint venture to produce fuel from animal fat and vegetable oil in response to growing demand for energy from renewable sources. The venture's first project will be a $150-million plant that can produce 75 million gallons a year of synthetic fuel for the renewable diesel, jet and military markets, the companies said.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Even as fears about the price and availability of energy rise and fall with the daily weather report, the twin forces of technology and environmental regulation are developing improved energy sources for the present decade and beyond. The biggest energy companies, Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Group and Chevron Corp., are constructing or planning facilities to convert natural gas to clean liquid fuels, such as sulfur-free diesel and heating oil.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite diesel's dirty image, Detroit auto makers are continuing to push it as a viable choice for improving fuel economy, particularly for gas-guzzling sport-utility vehicles and pickup trucks. General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and DaimlerChrysler are all increasing investment in diesel engines even as California and U.S. regulators are raising future diesel emissions standards.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
A B-52 bomber took off from here Friday with all eight of its engines running on synthetic fuel, the first time that a U.S. military aircraft has flown without the kerosene formula that has been used since the advent of the jets. The nearly six-hour flight of the lumbering Stratofortress went off without a hitch, Air Force officials said, lifting prospects for the use of alternative fuel by the military and commercial airlines as they grapple with the high price of crude oil.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. says its days of producing and marketing similar, look-alike vehicles that are different in name only are coming to an end. No longer will the Mercury Sable mid-size sedan be a knockoff of the Ford Taurus, the Tracer subcompact a tweaked Escort or the Mountaineer sport-utility vehicle a slightly more expensive twin of the Explorer. "That day at Ford is over," said James Schroer, the company's executive director of marketing strategy and brand management. "Badge engineering is out."
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