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NEWS
February 20, 1991
If Iraq agreed to Soviet peace proposals and pulled out of Kuwait before the start of a massive ground war, it would still be left with one of the most formidable arsenals in the Middle East.
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NEWS
January 26, 1992 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
American military officers on the rise have sought out assignments in Vietnam or the Persian Gulf, places where they could make a reputation. For Syrian commanders, it's Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, a place to make a bundle. Once the breadbasket of Lebanon, the Bekaa is today perhaps the Middle East's most compact center of dirty, dangerous business. Radical Turkish and Armenian terrorists train there. Pro-Iranian kidnapers caged the Western hostages in valley towns.
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BUSINESS
June 23, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
This country, the Syria of President Hafez Assad, is the one that other Middle Easterners point to as the next threat in the region, now that Iraq's military menace has been reduced. Syria has armed forces 400,000 strong, with another 400,000 in reserve. But with the cost of maintaining that army starving the rest of its economy for investment, Syria threatens itself more than anybody else.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
This country, the Syria of President Hafez Assad, is the one that other Middle Easterners point to as the next threat in the region, now that Iraq's military menace has been reduced. Syria has armed forces 400,000 strong, with another 400,000 in reserve. But with the cost of maintaining that army starving the rest of its economy for investment, Syria threatens itself more than anybody else.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Christian government of Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun urged the United States on Friday to send its diplomats back to Lebanon, calling their evacuation a misguided reaction to rumors that they were in danger. "The Cabinet expresses its regret . . . because the U.S. Administration based its decision on illusions, rumors and erroneous information," a statement from Aoun's three-man Christian Cabinet said.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Syrian tanks, together with troops and supply trucks, moved into position around the Christian enclave in Beirut, while the largest of Lebanon's Christian militias threw its support behind Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, the beleaguered Christian army commander. The decision by the militia group known as the Lebanese Forces to back Aoun with its 6,000 soldiers caused fear on both sides that the bloodiest confrontation of the nation's 14-year-old civil war lies just ahead.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Syrian troops Thursday left the government buildings they occupied after crushing rebel Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, and police said the final toll from last week's air and ground assault by Syrian and Lebanese troops on Aoun's forces stood at 350 dead and 1,200 wounded. However, doctors at East Beirut hospitals and military officials said the death toll was more than twice that high, with at least 750 killed, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Egyptian and Syrian troops will be stationed in Kuwait and other areas of the Persian Gulf as part of a postwar regional peace force in exchange for billions of dollars in economic aid from the oil-rich Arab nations, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
Egypt called for the formation of an ARAB PEACEKEEPING FORCE to fill the gap left by the eventual withdrawal of allied troops from the Persian Gulf. Egyptian Foreign Minister Esmat Abdel Meguid suggested that Egyptian and Syrian troops now deployed in the Gulf could be the nucleus of the force. He spoke at a meeting in Damascus of foreign ministers of Syria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates to discuss postwar security arrangements.
NEWS
November 6, 1988
The Syrian-backed Amal militia and the pro-Iranian Hezbollah (Party of God) said they had concluded a non-kidnaping pact to avert a military showdown between the two main Shia Muslim factions in Lebanon. In May, Syria sent troops into South Beirut's Shia slums to halt three weeks of fighting between the two rivals that left about 300 people dead and 1,000 wounded.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
Egypt called for the formation of an ARAB PEACEKEEPING FORCE to fill the gap left by the eventual withdrawal of allied troops from the Persian Gulf. Egyptian Foreign Minister Esmat Abdel Meguid suggested that Egyptian and Syrian troops now deployed in the Gulf could be the nucleus of the force. He spoke at a meeting in Damascus of foreign ministers of Syria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates to discuss postwar security arrangements.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they snaked through the fearsome Iraqi minefields on Monday--both poking the sands in primitive fashion with wooden sticks and sweeping the area with high-tech detection devices in search of explosives--U.S. Marines participating in the allied assault to free Kuwait continued to encounter another troubling obstacle. At each bend in their path, the Marines encountered more and more enemy prisoners. There were so many captives that correspondents traveling with the U.S.
NEWS
February 20, 1991
If Iraq agreed to Soviet peace proposals and pulled out of Kuwait before the start of a massive ground war, it would still be left with one of the most formidable arsenals in the Middle East.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Egyptian and Syrian troops will be stationed in Kuwait and other areas of the Persian Gulf as part of a postwar regional peace force in exchange for billions of dollars in economic aid from the oil-rich Arab nations, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rocky red earth fields of southern Syria spread in a flat plain in front of Damascus. The view was clear this week: no Syrian military buildup on its Israeli and Jordanian borders. "The army is on high alert," a Syrian government official said, but he insisted there had been no major troops movements since the Persian Gulf War broke out last week. Western diplomats in the capital say that their intelligence information is the same.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Syrian troops Thursday left the government buildings they occupied after crushing rebel Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, and police said the final toll from last week's air and ground assault by Syrian and Lebanese troops on Aoun's forces stood at 350 dead and 1,200 wounded. However, doctors at East Beirut hospitals and military officials said the death toll was more than twice that high, with at least 750 killed, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Several hundred Syrian soldiers moved into the southern suburbs of Beirut on Friday, halting a pro-Iranian militia group's effort to seize the area but not finding any Western hostages believed to be held there. Heavy fighting raged through the night in the congested slums south of Beirut and did not stop until just before the Syrian security plan, which had been disclosed Thursday, started to take effect about noon.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christian strongman Michel Aoun, whose quest for power in Beirut soaked the Lebanese capital in blood for nearly two years, gave up the fight Saturday and received asylum from France. The former Lebanese army commander ordered his loyal troops to support President Elias Hrawi, head of the Syrian-backed central government whose legitimacy the diminutive general had rejected.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Under heavy bombardment by Syrian forces, rebel Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun left his fortified headquarters and went to the French Embassy today, asking for a cease-fire, his radio station said. The attack on his compound in the presidential palace came hours after an assassination attempt against Aoun, who opposes the Syrian-backed government of President Elias Hrawi. "We have just learned that . . . Gen.
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