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September 13, 1990 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Hafez Assad, like Syria itself, has always perplexed the West. Yet of all the Arab leaders, none has been more skillful and cunning in executing policies that are both predictable and consistent. Ever since high school, when he led street demonstrations in support of Arab nationalism, Assad has been the odd man out in the Arab world, a contradictory figure who mastered the manipulation of others and built a reputation as a statesman who, though devious, honors his word.
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NEWS
March 29, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On these holy days leading to Easter, retired teacher George Rizkalla is on a lonely mission: to keep alive a language once spoken by Jesus. A self-described "enthusiast" for his native Aramaic, he has written songs in it for public performances and drawn up glossaries of the language using both Latin and Arabic letters. He prods his neighbors in this mountain village to speak it whenever possible and to teach it to the children so they won't be swallowed up in the Arabic all around.
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NEWS
March 29, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On these holy days leading to Easter, retired teacher George Rizkalla is on a lonely mission: to keep alive a language once spoken by Jesus. A self-described "enthusiast" for his native Aramaic, he has written songs in it for public performances and drawn up glossaries of the language using both Latin and Arabic letters. He prods his neighbors in this mountain village to speak it whenever possible and to teach it to the children so they won't be swallowed up in the Arabic all around.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Hafez Assad, like Syria itself, has always perplexed the West. Yet of all the Arab leaders, none has been more skillful and cunning in executing policies that are both predictable and consistent. Ever since high school, when he led street demonstrations in support of Arab nationalism, Assad has been the odd man out in the Arab world, a contradictory figure who mastered the manipulation of others and built a reputation as a statesman who, though devious, honors his word.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old man in the red fez, a fresh rosebud and the ribbon of the French Legion of Honor pinned to his lapel, leaned across his desk and spoke slowly and emphatically about a dark and dramatic chapter in Syrian history. "There was a movement in the country, in Aleppo and Hama, but it seemed to have no general aim," he said crisply, despite his 87 years, analyzing the events of 1980. "Was it to change the government? If that's true, where were the people to take over?"
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Syrian soldier stoops near the front wheel of a red Peugeot parked across from the American University of Beirut. Large square stones mark the area as a no-parking zone, a security measure to safeguard the university from Beirut's best-known weapon, the deadly car bomb. The soldier knows that this car has been hastily parked by a student late for class. Nevertheless, the violator will be punished.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Syrian soldier stoops near the front wheel of a red Peugeot parked across from the American University of Beirut. Large square stones mark the area as a no-parking zone, a security measure to safeguard the university from Beirut's best-known weapon, the deadly car bomb. The soldier knows that this car has been hastily parked by a student late for class. Nevertheless, the violator will be punished.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old man in the red fez, a fresh rosebud and the ribbon of the French Legion of Honor pinned to his lapel, leaned across his desk and spoke slowly and emphatically about a dark and dramatic chapter in Syrian history. "There was a movement in the country, in Aleppo and Hama, but it seemed to have no general aim," he said crisply, despite his 87 years, analyzing the events of 1980. "Was it to change the government? If that's true, where were the people to take over?"
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