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NEWS
January 15, 1987
The Soviet Union has recently supplied Syria with its most modern fighter plane and for the first time with submarines, the Israeli newspaper Maariv reported. Quoting intelligence sources, the newspaper said that the first shipment of Soviet MIG-31 jets recently arrived in Syria. Israeli Vice Adm. Abraham Ben-Shussan told reporters that the Damascus regime also has received new submarines from Moscow, Syria's first.
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NEWS
January 31, 1992 | Reuters
China continues to sell missile technology to Syria and Pakistan despite statements by Chinese leaders that they are willing to curb missile exports, the New York Times reported in today's editions. It quoted senior U.S. Administration officials as saying Beijing has recently delivered to Syria about 30 tons of chemicals needed to make a solid-fuel missile and plans to deliver an additional 60 tons in March or April.
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NEWS
January 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rocky red earth fields of southern Syria spread in a flat plain in front of Damascus. The view was clear this week: no Syrian military buildup on its Israeli and Jordanian borders. "The army is on high alert," a Syrian government official said, but he insisted there had been no major troops movements since the Persian Gulf War broke out last week. Western diplomats in the capital say that their intelligence information is the same.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rocky red earth fields of southern Syria spread in a flat plain in front of Damascus. The view was clear this week: no Syrian military buildup on its Israeli and Jordanian borders. "The army is on high alert," a Syrian government official said, but he insisted there had been no major troops movements since the Persian Gulf War broke out last week. Western diplomats in the capital say that their intelligence information is the same.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
As Syrian troops and Muslim militias drew a circle of fire around the main Christian forces in Lebanon early last week, international demands for restraint fell on deaf ears in this capital city. The U.S. State Department branded as an "irresponsible escalation" last weekend's Syrian-supported assault on Christian positions at strategic Souq el Gharb, the first ground attack in the ruinous, five-month-old artillery war over Beirut.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | Reuters
China continues to sell missile technology to Syria and Pakistan despite statements by Chinese leaders that they are willing to curb missile exports, the New York Times reported in today's editions. It quoted senior U.S. Administration officials as saying Beijing has recently delivered to Syria about 30 tons of chemicals needed to make a solid-fuel missile and plans to deliver an additional 60 tons in March or April.
NEWS
February 22, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
This nation, which was seen only months ago as taking a commanding role in the Arab world, has been forced onto the defensive. The Arab world's leading radical state has been impoverished by its economy and pushed to the margin by Arab moderates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1987 | From Reuters
Syria's defense minister, Maj. Gen. Mustafa Talas, arrived in Beirut on Wednesday on his first inspection since 7,000 Syrian troops were deployed in West Beirut in February to quell militia anarchy, local radio stations said.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Syria's defense minister, whose troops are on the allied side in the Persian Gulf War, said Iraq's Soviet-supplied tanks and automatic rifles are superior to those of the West and that the Patriot missile-killer is vastly overrated. "If the Americans had to fight a 'Star Wars' conflict, as depicted in movies, they would suffer a catastrophe," Gen. Mustafa Talas told the Soviet defense newspaper Red Star. Talas was in Moscow on a two-day visit. He implied that the U.S.
WORLD
September 21, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
DAMASCUS, Syria - At age 70, Ahmad Saidi took up arms after the slaying of his son, a father of five who was killed when a remote-controlled bomb blew up his car. A neighbor suspected in the attack was later overheard bragging about his "gift" for the Saidi family. "This is our homeland," Saidi, a textile merchant, said this week as he stood in camouflage pants amid the shrapnel-scarred interior of the Zubair Mosque, where even a stack of Korans had been shredded by bullets. "We will die defending it. " The defiant septuagenarian with the patrician crown of snow-white hair and matching beard is not a soldier with the Syrian army or a militant in a rebel brigade.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
As Syrian troops and Muslim militias drew a circle of fire around the main Christian forces in Lebanon early last week, international demands for restraint fell on deaf ears in this capital city. The U.S. State Department branded as an "irresponsible escalation" last weekend's Syrian-supported assault on Christian positions at strategic Souq el Gharb, the first ground attack in the ruinous, five-month-old artillery war over Beirut.
NEWS
February 22, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
This nation, which was seen only months ago as taking a commanding role in the Arab world, has been forced onto the defensive. The Arab world's leading radical state has been impoverished by its economy and pushed to the margin by Arab moderates.
NEWS
July 27, 1987
Syria has received its first shipment of Soviet-built MIG-29 fighters, but the top Soviet warplane is not seen as a threat in Israel, defense sources in Tel Aviv said. Syria, which received about 10 MIG-29s last week, is due to get 30 of the planes, a number insufficient to challenge the Israeli air force, the defense sources said. Israel's air force commander, Maj. Gen. Amos Lapidot, referring to the expected shipment, said: "It will improve the Syrian air force. . . .
WORLD
April 17, 2013 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is sending about 200 troops to Jordan, the vanguard of a potential U.S. military force of 20,000 or more that could be deployed if the Obama administration decides to intervene in Syria to secure chemical weapons arsenals or to prevent the 2-year-old civil war from spilling into neighboring nations. Troops from the 1st Armored Division will establish a small headquarters near Jordan's border with Syria to help deliver humanitarian supplies for a growing flood of refugees and to plan for possible military operations, including a rapid buildup of American forces if the White House decides intervention is necessary, senior U.S. officials said.
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