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Syria Emigration

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NEWS
December 12, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salim Kada was stowing the last of the children's clothing he hadn't managed to sell, tidying up his accounts and preparing to shut his tiny Oriental Shop for good when a visitor asked him how long his family has lived in Damascus. Kada shrugged. "Well, my father was born here," the 60-year-old replied. "My grandfather was born here. His grandfather was born here. And yes, I believe even his grandfather was born here. This is all I know. Thousands of years, I'm told."
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NEWS
November 22, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Khodor Kabariti left them a few months ago, the vine-covered alleys, redolent of stewing onions and sharp saffron, seemed like passages to the past. But the Jewish quarter in this ancient city was dying. It was time to end 2,700 years of Jewish history here in the heart of the Arab world and move on to new lives.
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NEWS
December 30, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 200 Syrian Jews have received exit permits in recent days, kindling hope in the Clinton Administration and the U.S. Jewish community that Syrian President Hafez Assad will keep his promise to allow his country's Jewish citizens to leave by New Year's Day or soon thereafter. The flurry of exit visas covers almost one-quarter of the 850 Syrian Jews who previously had not been allowed to emigrate.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 200 Syrian Jews have received exit permits in recent days, kindling hope in the Clinton Administration and the U.S. Jewish community that Syrian President Hafez Assad will keep his promise to allow his country's Jewish citizens to leave by New Year's Day or soon thereafter. The flurry of exit visas covers almost one-quarter of the 850 Syrian Jews who previously had not been allowed to emigrate.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of the land of Israel's worst enemy, they are one of the oldest Jewish communities in the world. Their ancient synagogues languish along the banks of the Euphrates River, and the sound of their prayers can be heard in the old cobbled streets near the tomb of the Islamic warrior Saladin. Their kosher butchers stand quietly next to mosques.
NEWS
February 22, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS
President Hafez Assad promised Sunday to allow the remaining members of Syria's ancient but dwindling Jewish community to leave the country if they wish, U.S. officials said. Assad made the promise to Secretary of State Warren Christopher after Christopher asked about reports that Jews' requests for exit visas were being denied, they said. In response to U.S. pressure, Assad decreed last year that Jews could travel abroad for the first time.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Khodor Kabariti left them a few months ago, the vine-covered alleys, redolent of stewing onions and sharp saffron, seemed like passages to the past. But the Jewish quarter in this ancient city was dying. It was time to end 2,700 years of Jewish history here in the heart of the Arab world and move on to new lives.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture clearly intended to improve the atmosphere for Middle East peace talks, Syrian President Hafez Assad agreed Sunday to allow U.S. investigators to visit Syria and Lebanon to try to learn the fate of seven Israeli soldiers who are missing in action, some for more than a decade. At the same time, Assad agreed to allow all remaining Syrian Jews, between 800 and 850 of them, to leave the country by the end of this month if they wish to do so.
NEWS
July 19, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli Radio said today that the Soviet Union offered to renew diplomatic ties with Israel and allow unrestricted Jewish emigration in exchange for Israel's withdrawal from Syria's Golan Heights and an end to anti-Soviet propaganda. The radio said Yuli Voronitsov, the Soviet ambassador to France, told Israel's ambassador in Paris, Ovadia Sofer, this week that Moscow is ready to make a major change in its relations with Israel if the conditions are met.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture clearly intended to improve the atmosphere for Middle East peace talks, Syrian President Hafez Assad agreed Sunday to allow U.S. investigators to visit Syria and Lebanon to try to learn the fate of seven Israeli soldiers who are missing in action, some for more than a decade. At the same time, Assad agreed to allow all remaining Syrian Jews, between 800 and 850 of them, to leave the country by the end of this month if they wish to do so.
NEWS
February 22, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS
President Hafez Assad promised Sunday to allow the remaining members of Syria's ancient but dwindling Jewish community to leave the country if they wish, U.S. officials said. Assad made the promise to Secretary of State Warren Christopher after Christopher asked about reports that Jews' requests for exit visas were being denied, they said. In response to U.S. pressure, Assad decreed last year that Jews could travel abroad for the first time.
NEWS
December 12, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salim Kada was stowing the last of the children's clothing he hadn't managed to sell, tidying up his accounts and preparing to shut his tiny Oriental Shop for good when a visitor asked him how long his family has lived in Damascus. Kada shrugged. "Well, my father was born here," the 60-year-old replied. "My grandfather was born here. His grandfather was born here. And yes, I believe even his grandfather was born here. This is all I know. Thousands of years, I'm told."
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of the land of Israel's worst enemy, they are one of the oldest Jewish communities in the world. Their ancient synagogues languish along the banks of the Euphrates River, and the sound of their prayers can be heard in the old cobbled streets near the tomb of the Islamic warrior Saladin. Their kosher butchers stand quietly next to mosques.
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