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NEWS
January 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every Iraqi Scud missile that crashes into Tel Aviv echoes politically here in Damascus, testing Syria's determination to stand with the allied forces in the Persian Gulf War. But President Hafez Assad's regime calculates that it has nothing to gain--and plenty to lose--by getting dragged into an Arab-Israeli conflict engineered by Saddam Hussein. It's furious at Hussein's attempts to light the fuse and scrambling to stamp it out.
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NEWS
April 24, 1996 | JIM MANN and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The joke here is that the world leaders streaming in to see Syrian President Hafez Assad these days have to take a number. Americans, Russians, French, Italians, Iranians--all of them have come seeking favors or help from Assad. On Tuesday, Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto dropped by, making up for a state visit that had been delayed because of American and Russian officials' pilgrimages here Saturday.
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NEWS
September 22, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Hafez Assad, the lone gun of Middle East politics, has joined the posse, sending Syrian troops to Saudi Arabia for the showdown with Iraq. In the shifting alliances of the Arab world, the 60-year-old Assad, two decades in power here, had remained obdurate and aloof. Diplomats called him "Mr. No." He was the man who sat and waited for things to turn his way. Now, faced with hard and complex new realities, he has taken a stand, one that is rife with risk.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The library was bursting out of the old house, so Suheil Zakkar built a large hall upstairs and laid in more books. There are more than 30,000 in all, a musty gilt, leather and ink shrine to the eras when Arabs fashioned an alphabet to set down their violent and lovely tales and liberated Jerusalem. Zakkar, Syria's premier historian, spends most of his hours at a cramped desk in the shadow of his towering shelves, writing a new history of the Crusades in 26 volumes, this one through Arab eyes.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whirlwind diplomacy behind the revived U.S. peace initiative for the Middle East has sent Arab leaders scrambling to cover their political bases while Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir considers his response. Secretary of State James A. Baker III's four-day blitz through Israel and key Arab capitals, spurred by Syrian acceptance of his carefully crafted formula for talks, pinned down commitments at a blistering rate.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria, Israel's most formidable adversary and the gatekeeper of hard-line Arab politics, had figured to dominate the landscape at the Middle East peace conference. Instead, Syria proved to be a paper tiger, outmaneuvered by Israel in the theater of public opinion and helpless to control the Arabs' slow movement toward the peace table. As Arabs and Israelis sat down for their first face-to-face talks in 43 years of turbulent history, all the lessons of the new Middle East came sharply into play.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The library was bursting out of the old house, so Suheil Zakkar built a large hall upstairs and laid in more books. There are more than 30,000 in all, a musty gilt, leather and ink shrine to the eras when Arabs fashioned an alphabet to set down their violent and lovely tales and liberated Jerusalem. Zakkar, Syria's premier historian, spends most of his hours at a cramped desk in the shadow of his towering shelves, writing a new history of the Crusades in 26 volumes, this one through Arab eyes.
NEWS
February 22, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
This nation, which was seen only months ago as taking a commanding role in the Arab world, has been forced onto the defensive. The Arab world's leading radical state has been impoverished by its economy and pushed to the margin by Arab moderates.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in Syria on Saturday, determined to use the Gulf Cooperation Council's new willingness to talk peace with Israel as a lever to bring President Hafez Assad's regime to the negotiating table. Baker's line of argument, a senior Administration official said, will be to warn Assad that he faces renewed isolation in the Arab world if he permits an Arab-Israeli peace conference to go ahead without him.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A shifting, rolling human sea bathed the streets from Ommayed Square down the tree-lined boulevard that runs through the heart of the city, hundreds of thousands of Damascenes waving, cheering, singing and applauding one of the most oppressive regimes in the Middle East. "With our blood and our souls we defend you, Assad!" screamed a fist-waving truckload of boisterous teen-agers threading their way crazily through the crowd.
NEWS
March 23, 1993
Syria will play host Sunday to a key meeting of Arab foreign ministers aimed at establishing a unified response to America's invitation to Israel and its neighbors to resume peace talks in Washington on April 20. The Syrian session will be watched closely by the Clinton Administration and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who welcomed U.S.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A shifting, rolling human sea bathed the streets from Ommayed Square down the tree-lined boulevard that runs through the heart of the city, hundreds of thousands of Damascenes waving, cheering, singing and applauding one of the most oppressive regimes in the Middle East. "With our blood and our souls we defend you, Assad!" screamed a fist-waving truckload of boisterous teen-agers threading their way crazily through the crowd.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria, Israel's most formidable adversary and the gatekeeper of hard-line Arab politics, had figured to dominate the landscape at the Middle East peace conference. Instead, Syria proved to be a paper tiger, outmaneuvered by Israel in the theater of public opinion and helpless to control the Arabs' slow movement toward the peace table. As Arabs and Israelis sat down for their first face-to-face talks in 43 years of turbulent history, all the lessons of the new Middle East came sharply into play.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whirlwind diplomacy behind the revived U.S. peace initiative for the Middle East has sent Arab leaders scrambling to cover their political bases while Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir considers his response. Secretary of State James A. Baker III's four-day blitz through Israel and key Arab capitals, spurred by Syrian acceptance of his carefully crafted formula for talks, pinned down commitments at a blistering rate.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in Syria on Saturday, determined to use the Gulf Cooperation Council's new willingness to talk peace with Israel as a lever to bring President Hafez Assad's regime to the negotiating table. Baker's line of argument, a senior Administration official said, will be to warn Assad that he faces renewed isolation in the Arab world if he permits an Arab-Israeli peace conference to go ahead without him.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every Iraqi Scud missile that crashes into Tel Aviv echoes politically here in Damascus, testing Syria's determination to stand with the allied forces in the Persian Gulf War. But President Hafez Assad's regime calculates that it has nothing to gain--and plenty to lose--by getting dragged into an Arab-Israeli conflict engineered by Saddam Hussein. It's furious at Hussein's attempts to light the fuse and scrambling to stamp it out.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | JIM MANN and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The joke here is that the world leaders streaming in to see Syrian President Hafez Assad these days have to take a number. Americans, Russians, French, Italians, Iranians--all of them have come seeking favors or help from Assad. On Tuesday, Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto dropped by, making up for a state visit that had been delayed because of American and Russian officials' pilgrimages here Saturday.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ignoring a threatened boycott by Syria, 18 of the Arab League's 22 members have agreed to attend an emergency summit May 28 in Baghdad, Iraq, to discuss the influx of Soviet Jews into Israel. Syria regards Iraq as enemy territory. At the meeting, Arab leaders hope to forge a common front concerning the possible settlement of Soviet Jews on Israeli-occupied land, which they believe would thwart hopes for a Palestinian state.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Hafez Assad, the lone gun of Middle East politics, has joined the posse, sending Syrian troops to Saudi Arabia for the showdown with Iraq. In the shifting alliances of the Arab world, the 60-year-old Assad, two decades in power here, had remained obdurate and aloof. Diplomats called him "Mr. No." He was the man who sat and waited for things to turn his way. Now, faced with hard and complex new realities, he has taken a stand, one that is rife with risk.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ignoring a threatened boycott by Syria, 18 of the Arab League's 22 members have agreed to attend an emergency summit May 28 in Baghdad, Iraq, to discuss the influx of Soviet Jews into Israel. Syria regards Iraq as enemy territory. At the meeting, Arab leaders hope to forge a common front concerning the possible settlement of Soviet Jews on Israeli-occupied land, which they believe would thwart hopes for a Palestinian state.
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