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NEWS
June 11, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria's political hierarchy moved swiftly Saturday to bring about a smooth transfer of power to Bashar Assad after the death of his father, President Hafez Assad. But many analysts believe that the relatively untested 34-year-old could eventually face difficulties in his bid to maintain and extend the Assad legacy.
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OPINION
September 4, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Every member of the Senate with a glimmer of ambition to run for president - and that's most of them - knows that a vote for war can make or break a political career. The example of Hillary Rodham Clinton, whose vote to authorize the 2003 invasion of Iraq crippled her bid for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008, is vivid in every mind on Capitol Hill. So while it might be tempting to assume that members of Congress will be thinking solely of the national interest when they vote on President Obama's request for punitive strikes against Syria, there will be old-fashioned politics at work as well.
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NEWS
July 7, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Late at night in a cramped apartment outside Damascus, a small group of Syrians discusses the death of Hafez Assad and the prospects for the country under the leadership of his son Bashar. "We're all upset that Hafez Assad died," was the sarcastic comment of one intellectual. "We're all upset that he wasn't murdered." The thought is, of course, heresy, and it is impossible to know how widely such sentiments might be shared among the population of 17 million.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Syrians kissed Bashar Assad's hands and cheeks, hugged him and smeared voting cards with their blood to show their loyalty during a nationwide referendum Monday, the last formality before the former ophthalmologist succeeds his father as head of state. The polling, orchestrated by the ruling Baath Party, was held exactly one month after the death of Assad's father, Hafez Assad, who ruled Syria with an iron grip for 30 years.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a mood of somber eulogy, and with a bow to its Arab and socialist roots, Syria's ruling Baath Party began its first congress in 15 years Saturday and prepared to formally hand over leadership of the country to the untested son of the late President Hafez Assad.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Syrians kissed Bashar Assad's hands and cheeks, hugged him and smeared voting cards with their blood to show their loyalty during a nationwide referendum Monday, the last formality before the former ophthalmologist succeeds his father as head of state. The polling, orchestrated by the ruling Baath Party, was held exactly one month after the death of Assad's father, Hafez Assad, who ruled Syria with an iron grip for 30 years.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As foreign dignitaries and the world's media poured into this insular capital Monday on the eve of President Hafez Assad's state funeral, the first public challenge emerged to the well-oiled plan for passing the mantle of leadership to his son Bashar.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria's ruling Baath Party ended a four-day conference by naming a revamped executive team Tuesday, including 12 new members chosen to help the nation's new leader modernize the country and clean up government. However, the party announced that policy toward Israel will not change under the leadership of Bashar Assad and that Syria will not make peace unless it gets back all of the occupied Golan Heights.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of grief-stricken young Syrians dressed in black filled the streets of this capital Sunday to mourn President Hafez Assad and chant fealty to his son Bashar, who was hastily put in command of the armed forces, an important step in consolidating his hold on power. The appointment of the 34-year-old as army chief after an immediate promotion from colonel to lieutenant general was a precursor to his investiture as president.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Only a July 10 referendum whose result is a foregone conclusion stands between former eye doctor Bashar Assad and the Syrian presidency after the parliament approved his nomination. Assad, a political novice and the son of the late President Hafez Assad, will be the only candidate on the ballot. A Syrian official who asked not to be identified said Assad's swearing-in has been set for July 17.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Late at night in a cramped apartment outside Damascus, a small group of Syrians discusses the death of Hafez Assad and the prospects for the country under the leadership of his son Bashar. "We're all upset that Hafez Assad died," was the sarcastic comment of one intellectual. "We're all upset that he wasn't murdered." The thought is, of course, heresy, and it is impossible to know how widely such sentiments might be shared among the population of 17 million.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Only a July 10 referendum whose result is a foregone conclusion stands between former eye doctor Bashar Assad and the Syrian presidency after the parliament approved his nomination. Assad, a political novice and the son of the late President Hafez Assad, will be the only candidate on the ballot. A Syrian official who asked not to be identified said Assad's swearing-in has been set for July 17.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria's ruling Baath Party ended a four-day conference by naming a revamped executive team Tuesday, including 12 new members chosen to help the nation's new leader modernize the country and clean up government. However, the party announced that policy toward Israel will not change under the leadership of Bashar Assad and that Syria will not make peace unless it gets back all of the occupied Golan Heights.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a mood of somber eulogy, and with a bow to its Arab and socialist roots, Syria's ruling Baath Party began its first congress in 15 years Saturday and prepared to formally hand over leadership of the country to the untested son of the late President Hafez Assad.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As foreign dignitaries and the world's media poured into this insular capital Monday on the eve of President Hafez Assad's state funeral, the first public challenge emerged to the well-oiled plan for passing the mantle of leadership to his son Bashar.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of grief-stricken young Syrians dressed in black filled the streets of this capital Sunday to mourn President Hafez Assad and chant fealty to his son Bashar, who was hastily put in command of the armed forces, an important step in consolidating his hold on power. The appointment of the 34-year-old as army chief after an immediate promotion from colonel to lieutenant general was a precursor to his investiture as president.
OPINION
September 4, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Every member of the Senate with a glimmer of ambition to run for president - and that's most of them - knows that a vote for war can make or break a political career. The example of Hillary Rodham Clinton, whose vote to authorize the 2003 invasion of Iraq crippled her bid for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008, is vivid in every mind on Capitol Hill. So while it might be tempting to assume that members of Congress will be thinking solely of the national interest when they vote on President Obama's request for punitive strikes against Syria, there will be old-fashioned politics at work as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Books can start wars, or shape how they are fought. Abraham Lincoln famously told Harriet Beecher Stowe that her book, “Uncle Tom's Cabin,” started the Civil War. In the 1990s, two books helped inform the policies of President Clinton in the Balkans. Robert D. Kaplan's "Balkan Ghosts: A Journey Through History" portrayed many centuries of  irreconcilable ethnic enmity and gave the impression of a morass that would swallow up any country that intervened there; David Remnick of the New Yorker called it a “marvelous alibi for inaction.” But later Clinton read Noel Malcolm's "Bosnia: A Short History," which portrayed the conflict in that country as the product of the Machiavellian political calculations of Slobodan Milosevic.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria's political hierarchy moved swiftly Saturday to bring about a smooth transfer of power to Bashar Assad after the death of his father, President Hafez Assad. But many analysts believe that the relatively untested 34-year-old could eventually face difficulties in his bid to maintain and extend the Assad legacy.
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