Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSyrian War
IN THE NEWS

Syrian War

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Patrick McDonnell, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
ARSAL, Lebanon - The battle is not going well for rebels dug in across the nearby brown hills in Syria, where pro-government forces were closing in Saturday on the opposition stronghold of Yabroud. Syrian insurgents and their many supporters on this side of the border exhibit both bravado and anguish about a battle, and a war, that is fast slipping from their hands. "We have to keep on fighting to the last man, the last breath," Abu Omar, 21, who lost his left leg to a tank shell outside Yabroud, said from his hospital bed. "We have no choice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Patrick McDonnell, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
ARSAL, Lebanon - The battle is not going well for rebels dug in across the nearby brown hills in Syria, where pro-government forces were closing in Saturday on the opposition stronghold of Yabroud. Syrian insurgents and their many supporters on this side of the border exhibit both bravado and anguish about a battle, and a war, that is fast slipping from their hands. "We have to keep on fighting to the last man, the last breath," Abu Omar, 21, who lost his left leg to a tank shell outside Yabroud, said from his hospital bed. "We have no choice.
Advertisement
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - A pair of suicide bombings at Iran's embassy that killed an Iranian diplomat and at least 24 other people underscored how the violence in Syria has traversed borders and fanned sectarian tensions across the Middle East. Lebanon has long been a secondary theater of the Syrian conflict, but Tuesday's twin blasts in Beirut were a blow aimed directly at Iran, one of the major foreign backers of the embattled government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Beginning with peaceful protests during the "Arab Spring" that challenged Assad's autocratic rule, Syria's strife has devolved over the last 32 months into a regional proxy war stoked by sectarian malice.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
GENEVA -- Peace talks aimed at ending the Syrian war hit an impasse Monday when the most contentious issue -- the future governing structure -- came up for discussion between representatives of President Bashar Assad and the U.S.-backed opposition. However, neither side walked out of the conference, and the United Nations mediator, Lakhdar Brahimi, said he expected that talks between the two sides would resume on Tuesday. Monday marked the third day of the U.N.-sponsored talks and the first that included discussion of the political future of Syria, a volatile issue at the core of the civil war. The Syrian opposition and its supporters, including Washington, view the talks as a means of forcing Assad to cede power after almost three years of destructive civil war. The government says Assad has no intention of stepping down and has tried to shift the focus to fighting terrorism.
OPINION
March 6, 2013
Re "Syria assails U.S. for aiding rebels," March 3 Here's an idea: If they don't want our help, don't give it to them. The U.S. government is partly to blame for keeping the Syrian war alive by employing both political and moral double standards. However, it is important to look at why the U.S. still intervenes despite the fact that the other allies - Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Turkey and Qatar - all choose to aid Syrian rebels, reportedly through supplying arms. America's participation in Mideast affairs lacks a principled foundation because it is based on the consent of Israel.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
GENEVA -- Peace talks aimed at ending the Syrian war hit an impasse Monday when the most contentious issue -- the future governing structure -- came up for discussion between representatives of President Bashar Assad and the U.S.-backed opposition. However, neither side walked out of the conference, and the United Nations mediator, Lakhdar Brahimi, said he expected that talks between the two sides would resume on Tuesday. Monday marked the third day of the U.N.-sponsored talks and the first that included discussion of the political future of Syria, a volatile issue at the core of the civil war. The Syrian opposition and its supporters, including Washington, view the talks as a means of forcing Assad to cede power after almost three years of destructive civil war. The government says Assad has no intention of stepping down and has tried to shift the focus to fighting terrorism.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - - President Obama faces a two-front battle to win the support of Congress for his plan to strike the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad, needing to convince both the skeptical representatives of a war-weary public and more hawkish lawmakers critical of his handling of Syrian crisis. Voices from both camps made their arguments Sunday on talk shows and in the halls of the Capitol, where some members returned for the first time in nearly a month for a classified briefing from national security officials - - the first such briefing on Syria open to the full membership of the House of Representatives.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Several key Republican senators strongly indicated Sunday that they will not vote to give President Obama authorization for a missile attack on Syria unless the White House first lays out “a strategy and a plan” to stop the Bashar Assad regime from ever again using chemical weapons. The senators, led by John McCain of Arizona, also signaled that they will use Obama's offer to seek congressional approval before any attack on Syria to press the administration and the Pentagon to make sure that a U.S. reprisal is a clear warning to Assad that he risks losing his hold over the war-torn country if any more chemical attacks are unleashed upon the Syrian people.
WORLD
June 12, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Facing a growing humanitarian crisis, Oxfam, the international relief agency, set a goal in January of raising $53 million to aid victims of Syria's brutal civil war. So far, Americans have contributed $150,000. Oxfam isn't alone. Mercy Corps has collected $900,000 for Syrian refugees during the 27 months of the war, a fraction of the $2.5 million raised in a few weeks in 2006 during the one-month war between Israel and the Hezbollah militia in Lebanon. Other aid groups report similar low levels of response - a sharp contrast to Americans' usual warmhearted giving to help victims of foreign earthquakes, floods and wars.
WORLD
March 26, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos, Los Angeles Times
AL QASR, Lebanon - Each evening, Ali Jamal and other men in this border town grab their Kalashnikov assault rifles, jump on their motorbikes and ride across the irrigation canal into Syria to protect their homes. The enemies are Sunni rebel "terrorists," he says, who target Jamal and his neighbors because they are Shiite Muslims. "Imagine, these people used to be our neighbors," said the 40-year-old farmer, perplexed by the transformation. "Now they want to kidnap and kill us. " Tensions gripping the villages along the border here between northeastern Lebanon and Syria illustrate the increasingly sectarian nature of the 2-year-old Syrian conflict and the risks it poses for the entire region.
WORLD
January 15, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Russia, an arms provider and principal player in the ongoing Syrian civil war, is doing far too little to help the war's millions of victims, international humanitarian agencies say. As world powers pledged new aid Wednesday at a donors conference in Kuwait, humanitarian groups said Moscow had been a standout in its failure to contribute adequately to the struggling international effort to help the injured and displaced. Russia has contributed about $24 million toward the United Nations appeal, about 5% of what it should give based on its size, according to Oxfam America.
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - A pair of suicide bombings at Iran's embassy that killed an Iranian diplomat and at least 24 other people underscored how the violence in Syria has traversed borders and fanned sectarian tensions across the Middle East. Lebanon has long been a secondary theater of the Syrian conflict, but Tuesday's twin blasts in Beirut were a blow aimed directly at Iran, one of the major foreign backers of the embattled government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Beginning with peaceful protests during the "Arab Spring" that challenged Assad's autocratic rule, Syria's strife has devolved over the last 32 months into a regional proxy war stoked by sectarian malice.
WORLD
October 19, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - Nine Lebanese hostages freed after being held by Syrian rebels for more than a year arrived to a tumultuous welcome in Beirut late Saturday, capping a complex deal that also resulted in the release of two Turkish pilots kidnapped in Lebanon and the reported freeing of scores of prisoners from Syrian jails. About an hour after the nine ex-hostages were mobbed by relatives and other well-wishers at a VIP lounge at Beirut's Rafik Hariri International Airport, images on Turkish television showed an aircraft carrying the two Turkish Airlines pilots arriving at Istanbul Ataturk Airport.
WORLD
September 11, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Summary executions, torture, hostage-taking and indiscriminate shelling of civilian homes are among the war crimes committed by both sides in the Syrian conflict, a special investigative panel of the United Nations Human Rights Council reported Wednesday. The report, based on 258 interviews with survivors of the violence and refugees from Syria, warned of a frightening escalation in recent months of acts in defiance of international law. Eight of nine investigated massacres in which the perpetrators could be reliably identified were blamed on government forces under Syrian President Bashar Assad, the report of the Independent International Commission of Inquiry said.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Several key Republican senators strongly indicated Sunday that they will not vote to give President Obama authorization for a missile attack on Syria unless the White House first lays out “a strategy and a plan” to stop the Bashar Assad regime from ever again using chemical weapons. The senators, led by John McCain of Arizona, also signaled that they will use Obama's offer to seek congressional approval before any attack on Syria to press the administration and the Pentagon to make sure that a U.S. reprisal is a clear warning to Assad that he risks losing his hold over the war-torn country if any more chemical attacks are unleashed upon the Syrian people.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - - President Obama faces a two-front battle to win the support of Congress for his plan to strike the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad, needing to convince both the skeptical representatives of a war-weary public and more hawkish lawmakers critical of his handling of Syrian crisis. Voices from both camps made their arguments Sunday on talk shows and in the halls of the Capitol, where some members returned for the first time in nearly a month for a classified briefing from national security officials - - the first such briefing on Syria open to the full membership of the House of Representatives.
WORLD
January 15, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Russia, an arms provider and principal player in the ongoing Syrian civil war, is doing far too little to help the war's millions of victims, international humanitarian agencies say. As world powers pledged new aid Wednesday at a donors conference in Kuwait, humanitarian groups said Moscow had been a standout in its failure to contribute adequately to the struggling international effort to help the injured and displaced. Russia has contributed about $24 million toward the United Nations appeal, about 5% of what it should give based on its size, according to Oxfam America.
WORLD
May 15, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Just when it seemed that Russia was poised to collaborate with Western powers on a new peace mission for Syria, a spy scandal has erupted to revive Cold War-era mistrust and division. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry had agreed barely a week ago to use their respective influence with Syrian President Bashar Assad and the rebels fighting him to convene face-to-face negotiations. On Monday, British Prime Minister David Cameron told President Obama that he found "common ground" with the Kremlin on the Syria crisis during his Moscow visit late last week.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - Gunmen waylaid a minibus carrying a Turkish Airlines crew on a road leading from Lebanon's major international airport Friday, kidnapping two pilots in an incident that appeared to be the latest fallout from the war in neighboring Syria. A group claiming responsibility said the abduction was in retaliation for the continued detention of nine Lebanese hostages who have been held for more than a year by Syrian rebels. The crime reverberated in two nations - Lebanon and Turkey - that have been hard-hit by the civil war in Syria, which shares a long border with both.
WORLD
July 17, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT -- The United Nations has called on nations not to turn back Syrian civil war refugees, whose swelling ranks now constitute the world's fastest-growing refugee flow in almost 20 years. “I reiterate my call to all states in the region and further afield to keep their borders open and receive all Syrians who seek protection,” U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres told the Security Council in New York on Tuesday via video link from Geneva. In recent weeks, several of Syria's neighbors, along with Egypt, have made it more difficult for Syrians to enter their countries.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|