Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSyringes
IN THE NEWS

Syringes

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
February 21, 2010 | By CATHARINE HAMM, On The Spot
Question: I have to give myself medically necessary injections. I carry a note from my doctor stating that the injections are prescribed. What would happen if the Transportation Security Administration opened my luggage, checked or carry-on, and found needles inside? Richard Showstack Newport Beach Answer: Assuming the syringes are for a legitimate medical purpose -- and in Showstack's case, they are -- probably nothing, says Suzanne Treviño, a spokeswoman for the TSA. "We come across this every day with passengers who have special needs," she says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO--The Assembly approved a measure Thursday that would permanently extend a provision allowing pharmacists to sell syringes without a prescription. Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), the bill's author, said expanding access to sterile needles is "the best way to stop the spread of some very deadly diseases. "   Public health experts say the use of shared needles among intravenous drug users contributes to the spread of HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Current state law that allows pharmacists to dispense up to 30 needles at a time without a prescription is set to expire at the end of this year.  The bill, AB 1743, would permanently allow pharmacists to sell syringes over the counter.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1985
Working together, hospitals and their suppliers could help prevent tragedies, like those reported recently, by developing a system for shape and color-coding all containers and syringes for injectable fluids; e.g., round red containers and syringes for intravenous injectables, square blue containers and syringes for spinal injectables, hexagonal yellow containers and syringes for intramuscular injectables, etc. If hospitals allow similar containers...
NATIONAL
November 29, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A nomadic medical technician who held hospital jobs from Arizona to New England has been indicted in connection with a hepatitis C outbreak that infected more than 30 patients at a New Hampshire hospital and exposed thousands of others in Pennsylvania, Maryland and other states. David M. Kwiatkowski, a 33-year-old former radiology technician, was charged Wednesday by a federal grand jury with seven counts of tampering with a consumer product and seven counts of obtaining controlled substances by fraud, the Justice Department said Thursday.
OPINION
July 26, 2011
For a generally progressive state, California falls surprisingly behind on certain issues. One of these is allowing the purchase of syringes without a prescription. Syringes are already an over-the-counter medical supply in 47 states. It's long past time for the same to be true in California. A pilot program signed into law in 2004 by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger allowed sales of syringes by pharmacies in counties that elected to join. Los Angeles was one of those. Yes, most of the sales were to addicts, who used the syringes to further their use of illegal drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO--The Assembly approved a measure Thursday that would permanently extend a provision allowing pharmacists to sell syringes without a prescription. Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), the bill's author, said expanding access to sterile needles is "the best way to stop the spread of some very deadly diseases. "   Public health experts say the use of shared needles among intravenous drug users contributes to the spread of HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Current state law that allows pharmacists to dispense up to 30 needles at a time without a prescription is set to expire at the end of this year.  The bill, AB 1743, would permanently allow pharmacists to sell syringes over the counter.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2008 | TIMES WIRE SERVICES
Covidien Ltd. is recalling 471,000 disposable insulin syringes because of mislabeling that could cause patients to receive an overdose, U.S. regulators said. The ReliOn hypodermic syringes could cause patients to get as much as 2 1/2 times the intended dose, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The syringes were sold on Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s website and in Wal-Mart and Sam's Club stores between Aug. 1 and Oct. 8. Sherwin-Williams Co., the biggest U.S. paint retailer, recalled 75,000 cans of spray-on fabric protector after a customer was overcome by fumes and hospitalized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1992 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convicted robber with a history of drug use, in custody for violation of parole, was identified Tuesday as the so-called "syringe bandit" who threatened robbery victims in the San Fernando Valley with a hypodermic needle that he claimed contained AIDS-infected blood, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man accused of using a blood-filled syringe he claimed was tainted with AIDS to rob shopkeepers was ordered Monday to stand trial on nine robbery and assault charges. San Fernando Municipal Judge Juelann K. Cathey ordered the trial for Wesley Pledger, 35, of Northridge after a daylong preliminary hearing on charges stemming from eight incidents in Canoga Park, Reseda and Northridge in March. The robber was dubbed the "AIDS Bandit" or the "Syringe Bandit" by police and media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who robbed a Northridge market while brandishing a syringe he claimed was filled with his own AIDS-infected blood is being sought in two other similar incidents, police said Tuesday. The three crimes occurred near Reseda Boulevard and Nordhoff Street, next to Cal State Northridge, between 1:30 and 2 p.m. Monday, Detective Wayne Newton said. In the first incident, the robber approached a man outside a bicycle shop, waved the syringe and demanded money.
SPORTS
May 25, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
A needle stored with a beer can appeared to contain an extremely tiny amount of Roger Clemens' DNA, which turned out to be good news and bad news for both sides in the perjury trial in Washington of the seven-time Cy Young Award winner. A forensic scientist on Friday linked Clemens to cotton balls and a syringe needle saved from an alleged steroids injection 11 years ago. His testimony, laced with statistics and probabilities, was one of the last pieces of the government's case in its effort to prove that the pitcher lied to Congress in 2008 when he denied using performance-enhancing substances.
SPORTS
May 15, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
WASHINGTON — An anxious wife drove Brian McNamee to hold on to evidence of Roger Clemens' steroid use for self-protection, the former trainer testified at the former pitcher's federal perjury trial. "She kept saying in the midst of a battle royale, 'You're going to go down if something ever happens,' " McNamee said. So as a measure of insurance, McNamee said, he held on to a beer can filled with a used needle, a syringe and a glass steroid ampule he had fished out of Clemens' recycling bin in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2011 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday signed two bills that will expand access to sterile syringes for drug users in an effort to combat the spread of hepatitis C and HIV. The first bill, written by Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco), allows people to buy syringes at pharmacies without a prescription. California was one of the few states where this was illegal, other than in a few pilot program areas. The second bill, introduced by Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley), allows the state to authorize needle exchange programs in areas deemed high risk for the spread of disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Harriet Ryan and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Michael Jackson's fingerprints were not on any of the syringes, vials or other medical paraphernalia that littered the scene of his death, attorneys said in court Thursday, undercutting the defense theory that the singer had given himself the drug that killed him. Attorneys for Dr. Conrad Murray have told jurors that while the physician wasn't looking, Jackson swallowed a sedative and gave himself the anesthetic propofol, a combination that killed...
OPINION
July 26, 2011
For a generally progressive state, California falls surprisingly behind on certain issues. One of these is allowing the purchase of syringes without a prescription. Syringes are already an over-the-counter medical supply in 47 states. It's long past time for the same to be true in California. A pilot program signed into law in 2004 by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger allowed sales of syringes by pharmacies in counties that elected to join. Los Angeles was one of those. Yes, most of the sales were to addicts, who used the syringes to further their use of illegal drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2010 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
An attorney for the doctor facing an involuntary manslaughter charge in the death of pop star Michael Jackson indicated at a hearing Wednesday that the defense will focus on a second syringe found at the singer's bedside. Attorney J. Michael Flanagan, representing Dr. Conrad Murray, told the judge the syringe may have been used by someone other than the doctor to administer the powerful anesthetic that caused Jackson's death June 25, 2009. "Who injected the propofol? That's the issue in this case," Flanagan told Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | LESLIE BERGER
A Northridge man accused of threatening to infect robbery victims with the AIDS virus is scheduled to be arraigned today in San Fernando Municipal Court. Wesley G. Pledger, 35, was charged Thursday with 10 counts of robbery, attempted robbery and assault with a deadly weapon--a hypodermic needle--during eight holdups last week in the San Fernando Valley, said Steve Teichner, a district attorney's spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1996
Police were searching late Tuesday for a man who robbed a Radio Shack of about $300 after threatening the clerk with a blood-filled syringe the robber said contained HIV, police said. The man--who was in his 30s, and wore jeans and a denim jacket--held up the store in the 1300 block of South Harbor Boulevard about 7:30 p.m., Police Lt. Dan Becerra said.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
What do Mary Poppins and neonatal doctors have in common? Both use sugar to ease medical unpleasantries. Sucrose has long been used as an analgesic for newborns; but now a study published online today in the Lancet says that the sweetener has no effect on pain levels in the babies’ brains. “Sucrose seems to blunt facial expression activity after painful procedures, but our data suggest that it … might not be an effective analgesic drug,” they wrote.
HEALTH
August 16, 2010 | By Kendall Powell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Physicians hear a common refrain from patients with Type 2 diabetes: "Not the needle! Not yet. Give me three more months. I'll be good!" So they try with renewed vigor to control their disease without insulin through diet, exercise and oral medications. Inevitably, many patients lapse and their diabetes again slips out of control, doing invisible damage to their kidneys, nervous systems and cardiovascular health. This cycle of fear and denial has little to do with insulin itself, a normal human protein, but rather its method of delivery: a hypodermic needle.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|