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Syrup

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NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Also called sugar syrup, simple syrup is a basic solution of sugar and water that has been heated until the sugar is completely dissolved. Simple syrups are used in a variety of recipes in the kitchen, whether brushed over cake layers before frosting to add moisture, tossed with fruit salads to sweeten, or shaken with cocktails for flavor and balance. The ratio of sugar to water in a simple syrup can vary depending on its use in a recipe, but a basic standard is equal parts of each: 1 part sugar to 1 part water.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Fans of Mexican Coke have been dismayed , saddened and angered  at recent reports that their beloved soda's key ingredient -- cane sugar -- will be replaced with old-fashioned corn syrup.  But fear not, the Mexican bottler that exports Coke to the U.S. assures consumers the soda's recipe won't be tinkered with, the Associated Press reported Wednesday. The outcry began when news outlets such as Quartz reported that executives from Arca Continental, the Mexican bottler, suggested in an earnings call that it would move to use cheaper sweeteners after the Mexican government imposed a new tax on soda.  Other news sites followed suit and soon enough, social media was awash with consumers who said they would soon begin hoarding cases of Mexican Coke.
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NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
When I signed up for a course in canning and preserving, I wasn't thinking much about pigs. The images in my mind were more of strawberries and cucumber pickles. Maybe beets. But of course there's an entire world of preserved meat out there. The preserved meat of my childhood was mostly frozen; my parents bought a half cow at a time, cheaper than buying smaller bits. And it was chipped beef on toast; the tiny jar of thinly sliced beef that my mom could stretch to feed five of us. And then we had a juice glass to boot.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
When I signed up for a course in canning and preserving, I wasn't thinking much about pigs. The images in my mind were more of strawberries and cucumber pickles. Maybe beets. But of course there's an entire world of preserved meat out there. The preserved meat of my childhood was mostly frozen; my parents bought a half cow at a time, cheaper than buying smaller bits. And it was chipped beef on toast; the tiny jar of thinly sliced beef that my mom could stretch to feed five of us. And then we had a juice glass to boot.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
The diet of modern Americans bears little resemblance to the foods our ancestors ate, and this discrepancy is often noted in discussions about the causes of the current “obesity epidemic.” The argument goes like this: Since fat and sugar were historically hard to come by, our bodies are built to hold on to them to help us get through the lean times. This may have served us well in the caveman days, but not so much in the era of the KFC Double Down sandwich. Dr. David Ludwig, director of the Optimal Weight for Life program at Children's Hospital Boston, takes a fascinating look at how innovations in food technology have backfired for humankind over the millenia in this week’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
SCIENCE
July 11, 2009 | Shara Yurkiewicz
Squirting the sugar substitute xylitol on infants' teeth could help prevent the tooth decay that afflicts an estimated 28% of U.S. children ages 2 to 5, according to a new study. Severe tooth decay occurs when bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans proliferate in the mouth and attack enamel. Largely preventable, it strikes poor children twice as often as wealthier ones. The problem is compounded because decay is more likely to go untreated in poorer communities.
SPORTS
January 21, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
After missing a game because of back spasms that began when he sat down for a pancake breakfast, Dustin Penner cleverly turned a potentially embarrassing incident into a running joke that enhanced his image and could benefit the Kings' charitable foundation. If the burly left wing could turn his miserable season around as effectively as he turned the pancake incident into a public relations bonanza, the Kings might not rank near the bottom of the NHL in scoring. "Working on it," Penner said Saturday morning as the Kings prepared to face the Colorado Avalanche on Saturday night at Staples Center.
FOOD
July 2, 1987
It probably hasn't occurred to most people that golden, ruby-blushed nectarines can be pickled, yet the fruit stays firm and plump when immersed in a spicy syrup. After a day or so in the refrigerator to blend flavors, the nectarine halves make an excellent accompaniment to grilled meats. Take advantage of abundant supplies of nectarines now coming to market to prepare this relish, as well as for out-of-hand eating. Choose fruit with a creamy yellow background without any green at the stem end.
HEALTH
February 16, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
People who begin using zinc lozenges, tablets or syrup at the first signs of a cold are more likely to get well faster, researchers reported Tuesday. But the new findings probably won't be the last word on the issue, which has been the subject of debate since the idea was first proposed in 1984. Since that time, 18 studies have examined zinc in preventing or treating colds. Some found zinc supplements were modestly helpful, others failed to turn up any benefits. One analysis of 14 studies, published in 2007, concluded that many of the studies were too flawed to draw any conclusions.
FOOD
December 12, 1985 | MINNIE BERNARDINO, Times Staff Writer
Question: Do you have the recipe for the starter for Friendship Fruitcake? I have two recipes, but one calls for the fruit from the starter and the other a starter liquid. I've tasted the cake and it was moist and delicious. A friend said she once was given the starter to make a cake but she couldn't trace the starter recipe as everyone just seemed to have been given the starter. The starter, she said, could be increased by adding more sugar and more canned fruit.
FOOD
September 7, 2013 | Jessica Gelt
There are times when hard liquor feels too, well, hard, but beer or wine just won't do. That's when it's best to get creative. Take, for example, an interesting little tipple created by mixologist Dave Fernie (Harvard & Stone, Pour Vous) for chef Phillip Lee's new Scratch Bar on La Cienega Boulevard's restaurant row. Nigori sake serves as the base of this light refresher, which is pepped up by the addition of fresh pineapple and lime juices and a touch of simple syrup. The final, pleasing twist is delivered via a pinch of salt.
FOOD
August 31, 2013
30 minutes, plus cooling time. Serves 6 as dessert, or 10 to 12 as a garnish 3 cups pomegranate juice 3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar, or to taste 3 strips of orange zest (about 2 inches long) 3 strips of lemon zest (about 2 inches long) 6 small Bartlett pears, ripe but firm Pomegranate arils, for garnish (optional) 1. To make the syrup, combine the pomegranate juice, sugar and the orange and lemon zest strips in a heavy saucepan. Heat over low heat, stirring gently, until the sugar dissolves.
FOOD
August 10, 2013 | Jessica Gelt
Sip the essence of summer with the icy Frozen Rose cocktail, created by mixologist Matthew Schaefer for the very refined Chateau Marmont. Cold enough to cause a lovely condensation on the outside of your glass, this slow sipper is made with Martin Miller gin, which is blended with soft Icelandic water. The gin is mixed with a touch of aquavit (a Scandinavian spirit distilled from grain or potatoes and flavored with strong spices like cardamom, anise and cumin) and rounded out with sweet orgeat syrup, sour lemon and a lively Champagne float.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
I curate a bi-weekly recipe column for The Times' Saturday section called "Destination: Cocktail. " To date, I've culled 100 recipes created by some of the city's best bartenders, for some of the city's best bars and restaurants. I just finished poring over them all in order to pull out my favorite ones for Father's Day. My criteria was simple: Nothing too sweet; nothing "girly," ie: nothing made with sugary fruit juices, strawberries, bananas or lotus fruit; nothing with too many steps; nothing made with infused liquors or housemade syrups.
FOOD
June 1, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Savory cocktail lovers have reason to rejoice, thanks to an incredibly potent drink called Bread Service, created by Nate Howell for the Mediterranean-inspired Cusp Dining & Drinks in La Jolla. The cocktail's driving force is a house-made salt-and-pepper syrup that is a bit sweet and a lot spicy. The syrup is blended with herbaceous gin and a touch of aquavit, a Scandinavian spirit that has been around since the 1500s and is made with a variety of pungent herbs and spices, including caraway.
FOOD
May 22, 2013
  Total time: 20 minutes, plus chilling time Servings: 1 Note: From Diane Forley. Lillet is an aperitif available at grocery store liquor sections and liquor stores. 1 cup sugar 1 cup water 2 tablespoons dried lemon verbena leaves or 1 (6-inch) fresh leaf of lemon verbena 1 ounce Lillet (white) 4 ounces Champagne or sparkling wine Orange-peel twist 1. Combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan. Heat to boiling. Cook until the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved.
FOOD
April 2, 2008
  Total time: 12 minutes, plus cooling time for the simple syrup Servings: 1 Note: From Jack McLaughlin of Akasha Restaurant, Bar & Bakery. Thai basil is available at 99 Ranch stores and select Thai markets, as well as select farmers markets. The restaurant uses Juniper Green organic gin; you can substitute the gin of your choice (we used Plymouth). Thai basil simple syrup 2/3 cup organic cane sugar 1 ounce fresh Thai basil leaves 1. In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the sugar and two-thirds cup water to a boil.
FOOD
August 10, 2013 | Jessica Gelt
Sip the essence of summer with the icy Frozen Rose cocktail, created by mixologist Matthew Schaefer for the very refined Chateau Marmont. Cold enough to cause a lovely condensation on the outside of your glass, this slow sipper is made with Martin Miller gin, which is blended with soft Icelandic water. The gin is mixed with a touch of aquavit (a Scandinavian spirit distilled from grain or potatoes and flavored with strong spices like cardamom, anise and cumin) and rounded out with sweet orgeat syrup, sour lemon and a lively Champagne float.
FOOD
April 27, 2013
Buttermilk biscuits and burnt orange honey butter 1 hour, 20 minutes. Makes about 1 dozen biscuits Buttermilk biscuits 4 cups (17 ounces) flour 3 tablespoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup sugar 1 cup (2 sticks) cold butter 2 cups buttermilk Cream or melted butter, for brushing Natural sugar, for sprinkling 1. Heat the oven to 425 degrees. 2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Cube or grate the cold butter on top of the dry ingredients, and then cut it in using a pastry cutter or fork.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
The Coachella 2013 party scene opened Friday with burgers, tacos, rapper Nas and free-flowing Hennessy. Behind a large shopping center just off Washington Boulevard in Palm Desert, party-goers spilled out of large white vans. The makeshift party shuttles made their way over a large dirt lot to a private residence for the Hennessy V.S. Details party. Dimly lighted tepees covered an expansive green lawn. Inside, people dined on burgers from a nearby Fatburger truck and tacos from a Border Grill truck.
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