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Syrup

NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
The diet of modern Americans bears little resemblance to the foods our ancestors ate, and this discrepancy is often noted in discussions about the causes of the current “obesity epidemic.” The argument goes like this: Since fat and sugar were historically hard to come by, our bodies are built to hold on to them to help us get through the lean times. This may have served us well in the caveman days, but not so much in the era of the KFC Double Down sandwich. Dr. David Ludwig, director of the Optimal Weight for Life program at Children's Hospital Boston, takes a fascinating look at how innovations in food technology have backfired for humankind over the millenia in this week’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
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NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Maple syrup: It's sweet, it's calorific, and -- this just in -- it contains antioxidants and anti-inflammatories and stuff. Which must mean -- reasoning leap alert! -- that it is a superfood that can help ward off myriad health problems, like cancer and diabetes. In a study just reported at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, researchers analyzed the various compounds in maple syrup. They found 54 antioxidants, including five new ones. (One they've dubbed Quebecol, after the region where much maple syrup is produced.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2011 | Sandy Banks
The ladies clogging the canned food aisles at the Crenshaw-area Ralphs last week weren't trying to find the best deals for their pocketbooks, but the smartest choices for their bodies. The peaches intended for Sunday's cobbler? Those packed in "extra heavy" syrup come with twice the calories as the "extra light" variety. The chicken broth for a hearty soup? "Natural goodness" on the label means 400 fewer grams of sodium. Substitute brown rice for white, and you've got half the calories and twice the fiber.
HEALTH
February 16, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
People who begin using zinc lozenges, tablets or syrup at the first signs of a cold are more likely to get well faster, researchers reported Tuesday. But the new findings probably won't be the last word on the issue, which has been the subject of debate since the idea was first proposed in 1984. Since that time, 18 studies have examined zinc in preventing or treating colds. Some found zinc supplements were modestly helpful, others failed to turn up any benefits. One analysis of 14 studies, published in 2007, concluded that many of the studies were too flawed to draw any conclusions.
FOOD
December 23, 2010
The Last Mohican Total time: 6 minutes Servings: 1 Note: Adapted from Matthew Biancaniello, Library Bar at Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel 1/2 very ripe Hachiya persimmon 1/4 lime 5 mint leaves, plus 1 sprig for garnish 3/4 ounce agave syrup 2 ounces bourbon (Biancaniello uses Basil Hayden) Pinch of ground Italian espresso (optional) In a shaker with ice, muddle the persimmon, lime and mint leaves with the agave syrup. Add ice and the bourbon. Shake and strain over ice. Garnish with a mint sprig.
FOOD
December 23, 2010
  Nuit rouge Total time: 40 minutes, plus cooling time for the syrup Servings: 1 Note: Adapted from Vincenzo Marianella, Copa d'Oro. Make cranberry ice cubes by placing cranberries into 1-inch ice cube molds and pouring cranberry juice to fill. Freeze until set. Cinnamon-allspice syrup 1 cup water 1 cup sugar 4 cinnamon sticks, broken into pieces 1 to 11/2 teaspoons allspice 1 (4-inch) vanilla bean, split 1. In a saucepan , combine the water, sugar, cinnamon and allspice.
FOOD
December 23, 2010 | Betty Hallock
After last-minute shopping at two malls and a side trip to find wrapping paper only to come home and discover you've run out of Scotch tape, nothing makes the holidays happier than a good stiff drink. It's even better if it's one that's easy to concoct and uses what's in season. And now that we're just days from turning the corner to 2011, sharing a cocktail or three with friends and family is imperative -- in a convivial setting, maybe with James Brown's "Soulful Christmas" playing, some mistletoe hanging or even balloons and streamers.
FOOD
December 23, 2010
  PapÃ?Â?Ã?­ Pera cocktail PapÃ?Â?Ã?­ Pera Total time: 12 minutes, plus steeping time for the syrup Servings: 1 Note: Adapted from Alex Day Cinnamon syrup 4 (3 ounces) cinnamon sticks 1 cup water 1 cup sugar Muddle the cinnamon sticks until broken. In a saucepan, combine the cinnamon, water and sugar, and bring just to a boil. Simmer for 3 minutes, remove from heat and cover. Set aside for at least 3 hours to cool and allow the flavor to develop.
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