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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1992 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Streeter and baseball manager Sparky Anderson have a lot in common. Both were savvy strategists who put ball-playing teams called the Reds on the map with an impressive set of league championships. But Anderson, who took Cincinnati to two World Series championships in the 1970s, probably never had to call time out to lend a hankie and some comfort to a player crying over a missed ball. For Streeter, it was a routine play.
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SPORTS
March 25, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
Blake Griffin was annoyed. And justifiably so. The Clippers were letting the lowly Milwaukee Bucks hang in there a little too long on Monday night but were just four-tenths of a second from being able to regroup at halftime. Well, it would have been just four-tenths of a second if a clueless fan sitting courtside would have just given Griffin the darn ball after it bounced to her just before the buzzer. Instead, she held on to it while fiddling with her phone and snapping a shot of the Clippers star standing over top of her. He even appealed to the official before the young woman, apparently satisfied with her portrait of an angry basketball player, released the ball, finally allowing Griffin to throw his meaningless inbound pass to end the half.
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NEWS
March 31, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Take me out to the . . . South Lawn? Yes, indeed. Baseball, kiddie-style, is coming to the White House. And George W. Bush, the first Little League "graduate" to attain the Oval Office, will preside as commissioner in chief. With some 60 major league baseball Hall of Fame legends arrayed behind him in the elegant East Room, the president announced Friday that he and First Lady Laura Bush will regularly host coed T-ball games during the next four years, starting in a few weeks.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
As talk heats up again ( again?) about bringing a National Football League team back to Southern California after a 15-year halftime break, I propose that the following slogan be tattooed on the forehead of any civic booster associated with such a proposal: "Remember Irwindale!" Irwindale, for those of you who don't remember, is the San Gabriel Valley community that got scammed into giving Raiders owner Al Davis a $10-million, nonrefundable down payment to bring his team over from the L.A. Coliseum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1998 | JOEL SAPPELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If I were working for the Fox Group--those guys who've been swinging some pretty mean axes over at Dodger Stadium--I'd probably be designated for reassignment to T-ball. It all started so hopefully, this season of heart and heartache. In the spring, a friend and I decided to balance the grind of work by coaching a ragtag team of kids who, by virtue of their advanced ages of 7 and 8, had graduated to "Pee Wees" in the Eagle Rock Recreation Center's baseball league.
SPORTS
October 6, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
The sun had ducked behind the White Tank Mountains long ago, shrouding the baseball field at Phoenix St. Mary's High in darkness. But the former junior college infielder and his teenage son weren't about to end their workout. So the man kept throwing baseballs through the gloaming. And his son, squinting to see each pitch, kept lining them to every corner of the field. Thwack! Thwack! Thwack! And so it went, nearly every spring and summer day, for more than half a dozen years.
SPORTS
February 25, 1998 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
From the time they were old enough to chew bubble gum, Matt Fisher, Matt Cassel and Conor Jackson have been called baseball wonders. Every step of the way, from T-ball through senior league, they've stood out as all-stars. In youth drafts, they were certain No. 1 picks. If only they had agent Dennis Gilbert to negotiate their pizza deals. Time has flown by. They're now sophomores in high school, Fisher and Cassel at Chatsworth, Jackson at El Camino Real.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Opening Day for President Bush's initiative to bring pint-sized baseball players to the White House South Lawn will be May 6. The children will be playing T-ball, in which, rather than facing a pitcher, players hit the ball off a waist-high plastic tube--the "T"--attached to home plate. Children from two Washington teams, the Capitol City League Rockies and the Satchel Paige League Memphis Red Sox, will play the first game, White House aides said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1996
We began T-ball season in Port Heuneme with high hopes. But my son's coach missed the first practice. Oh, well, a nice coach on another team let us join him. We fit right in and he agreed to let us join his team. I called the league and was informed that changing teams was against the rules. Period. Second practice. Coach and a woman show up. Turns out the original coach can't coach and she is taking over, but she admits she has no knowledge of the rules. She says her husband who coaches another team will help out. He is good but only comes twice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1996 | SCOTT STEEPLETON
The Moorpark Community Services Department is holding open enrollment for children who want to play T-ball or basketball. The department is sponsoring a T-ball league for 6- to 8-year-olds. The $37 registration includes a T-shirt, trophy and league fees. Children will learn catching, throwing and batting skills in a noncompetitive environment. Practice begins Saturday with volunteer coaches setting the weekly practice sessions.
SPORTS
October 6, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
The sun had ducked behind the White Tank Mountains long ago, shrouding the baseball field at Phoenix St. Mary's High in darkness. But the former junior college infielder and his teenage son weren't about to end their workout. So the man kept throwing baseballs through the gloaming. And his son, squinting to see each pitch, kept lining them to every corner of the field. Thwack! Thwack! Thwack! And so it went, nearly every spring and summer day, for more than half a dozen years.
SPORTS
May 29, 2009 | CHRIS ERSKINE
To the good people in Aisle 3, Rows V and W: From the bottom of my tiny, baseball-shaped heart, I am sorry for what happened the other day. Sorry for the giggle fits and the carnage. We thought it'd be nice, you know, to take the T-ball team to a real game, at a real ballpark, to cap off their magical-maniacal season. For nothing bonds fathers and sons like baseball. And, as you well know, baseball loves nothing so much as kooks and oddballs, which this T-ball team has in spades. No disrespect.
HOME & GARDEN
May 2, 2009 | CHRIS ERSKINE
We pull off to the school drop-off. A kid gets out, and here's what comes pouring out of our family car: -- a hockey stick -- $27.50 in pennies -- a lacrosse ball -- a box of tampons -- two ticket stubs from Hollywood Park -- a copy of Sports Illustrated -- a tube of hemorrhoid cream -- an old pregnancy test (flunked) -- 14 Starbucks cups -- a baseball glove I drive away, leaving all of it, except for the baseball glove, the only thing of value in a car full of crud.
SPORTS
March 5, 2009 | CHRIS ERSKINE
With a little luck, my son's T-ball team will remember this Not-So-Great Depression simply as a time they played ball twice a week and had a lot of fun. At the end of the game the parents would bring snacks. If the dads were worried, they didn't show it . . . not much anyway. Not as much as they probably should have. When Dad seemed depressed, you dragged him out to the frontyard for a game of catch -- to this day, the best free activity the world has ever known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Jerry Sacharski, a recreation league director who pioneered T-ball as an organized youth sport in the 1950s because he couldn't bear to turn away young children who clamored to play baseball, has died. He was 93. Sacharski, who was a retired high school teacher, died Friday of natural causes at his home in Albion, Mich., said a spokeswoman for the J. Kevin Tidd Funeral Home.
HOME & GARDEN
June 26, 2008 | Chris Erskine
So THE Blue Jay Sluggers cap their undefeated season -- no wins, no losses, 14 ties -- with a party in the park. It's a lavish display befitting today's modern athlete: food, gifts and groupies (in this case, the boys' moms). "Want some lemonade?" one of the parents asks. "It's not just lemonade," whispers someone else. "Yeah, don't get too close to a fire," says one of the dads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1998 | CAROLE L. SPIVEY
My family and I recently attended my daughter's graduation from a California State University campus--a long-awaited event. As family and friends, we were acutely aware of the sacrifices required, not only by her but also by her husband and child, in order for this day to occur. The weather was a picture-perfect Southern California day with a cloudless blue sky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Jerry Sacharski, a recreation league director who pioneered T-ball as an organized youth sport in the 1950s because he couldn't bear to turn away young children who clamored to play baseball, has died. He was 93. Sacharski, who was a retired high school teacher, died Friday of natural causes at his home in Albion, Mich., said a spokeswoman for the J. Kevin Tidd Funeral Home.
HOME & GARDEN
May 29, 2008 | Chris Erskine
I REALIZED in the second week of the T-ball season that I had somehow been blessed with a team of elves, leprechauns and Smurfs. There they were, sitting on the bench in the dugout one afternoon, squirming as if on a church pew when I thought: "ELVES! By gawd, the league gave me a roster full of elves!" Just lucky, I guess. Two months later, I love them like sons. Indeed, our starting lineup looks something like this (batting averages included): Sneezy .999 Grumpy .999 Itchy .989 Gooey .
NATIONAL
July 16, 2005 | From Associated Press
A T-ball coach allegedly paid one of his players $25 to hurt an 8-year-old mentally disabled teammate so he wouldn't have to put the boy in the game, police said Friday. Mark R. Downs Jr., 27, of Dunbar, Pa., is accused of offering one of his players the money to hit the boy in the head with a baseball, police said. Witnesses told police Downs didn't want the boy to play in the game because of his disability.
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