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T Bone Burnett

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October 18, 1992 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for Westside/Valley Calendar.
The man at the controls is all nervous concentration tonight. The road to heaven is on his mind, and it's a road paved with strawberries, as it turns out. Or that's the version T-Bone Burnett is being serenaded with, under a gentle mingling of cello and the voice of his wife, Sam Phillips. She'd written "Strawberry Road" after hearing an old American Indian parable that says the route to paradise is indeed covered with fresh strawberries.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
A trove of two dozen unfinished Bob Dylan songs written circa 1967 during his “Basement Tapes” period is being completed by an all-star band assembled by producer T Bone Burnett and including Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford and My Morning Jacket's Jim James for release as an album and Showtime special later this year. “These are not B-level Dylan lyrics,” Burnett, 66, said Monday during a break in filming and recording sessions in Hollywood for the project titled “Lost on the River: The New Basement Tapes.” “They're lyrics he just never got around to finishing.” Rounding out the band working on the new material are Carolina Chocolate Drops singer Rhiannon Giddens and Dawes lead guitarist and songwriter Taylor Goldsmith, all of whom are being treated as peers on the project.
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NEWS
April 19, 2011 | Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
As an actor, Jeff Bridges followed his Oscar-winning turn as down-but-not-out country singer Bad Blake in "Crazy Heart" with an Oscar-nominated spin as down-but-not-out lawman Rooster Cogburn in "True Grit. " Now comes the news that Bridges will pick up a guitar once more, not for "Crazy Heart II," but for an album slated to be produced by his longtime friend, producer and "Crazy Heart" prime mover T Bone Burnett. Bridges has signed with Blue Note Records and is scheduled to release his major-label debut album late this summer, according to a statement released Tuesday by Blue Note.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
One of the most beguiling folk records of the year has the bonus of ferrying along a Joel and Ethan Coen plot line. The songs within the brothers' new "Inside Llewyn Davis" move from balladry to blues to ancient British folk, adding an extra layer of lyricism and revealing a portal to another storytelling realm. The selections and performances highlight a moment when a perfectly realized stanza sung honestly in a smoky cafe could produce an audible gasp, reverberate throughout New York's Greenwich Village and, with luck or if your name were Bob Dylan, American culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Stephen Bruton, a Texas musician long admired and much in demand as much for his astute guitar work as for his insights as a songwriter, died Saturday in Los Angeles of complications of cancer. He was 60.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010
Original song "The Weary Kind (Theme From "Crazy Heart") Ryan Bingham and T Bone Burnett In a category stacked with two Randy Newman nominations, the king of the wry show tune was beaten out by Ryan Bingham and T Bone Burnett for "The Weary Kind," their co-written theme to the Jeff Bridges vehicle "Crazy Heart."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1986 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
T-Bone Burnett, whose record-producing credits range from Los Lobos and Marshall Crenshaw to Elvis Costello, was bitten early--and hard--by the studio bug. "When I was a senior in high school I had a little local band, and we went into a studio to cut a record. It was really fascinating," the long-limbed Burnett said, grinning at the memory. "A few months later I bought the studio." That was 20 years ago in Fort Worth, Tex.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1989 | DON WALLER
Performing in the put-up-or-shut-up framework of a solo acoustic showcase on Friday at McCabe's, singer/guitarist T Bone Burnett proved himself as humorous as devil worship and as serious as nuclear waste. The long tall Texan opened the first of two shows with his best, i.e., least affected song, "River of Love," and closed the 90-minute set by walking out onto Pico Boulevard to serenade the waiting late-show crowd with a campfire sing-along of "Kumbaya." In between, Burnett played pop, country, blues, and rock, ranging from the marks-his-Lennonisms of "Killer Moon" to two deja-vu versions of the standard "Where or When."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
A small segment of mainstream America might remember T Bone Burnett from the 2002 Grammy telecast, where this tall, mysterious fellow picked up the album-of-the-year award instead of U2 or OutKast. Burnett was the producer of the surprise winner, the "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, a collection of blues, folk and bluegrass whose huge sales and acclaim helped reshape the pop landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
Jakob Dylan called in some impressive collaborators to help with his new "Women and Country" album that's coming out next month, at the top of the list being producer extraordinaire T Bone Burnett and singer-songwriter Neko Case, the latter of whom serves as his vocal foil on several of the songs. But it's entirely possible the whole project never would have existed if not for Glen Campbell. The Campbell connection came up earlier this year when Dylan went to visit Burnett, a longtime Dylan family friend, at work in the studio with another artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Inside Llewyn Davis," the Coen brothers' latest movie, shines a light on the early-1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, focusing on a struggling folk singer (Oscar Isaac, a revelation) who can't get a handle on his career or personal life. T Bone Burnett supervised the music, as he did with the Coens' "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and has staged a handful of concerts featuring folk songs from the film's warm soundtrack. We spoke to Joel and Ethan Coen shortly after one such show in Santa Monica about their inspirations for the movie and what it might say to artists today.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
On Oct. 25, 1975, Elton John played the first of two sold-out concerts at Dodger Stadium for a combined audience of 110,000 people. The gigs helped establish John as one of the most theatrical pop stars in the world: a piano-pounding dynamo prowling the stage in a bedazzled Dodgers uniform. Last week, John was back in L.A., performing in a somewhat cozier, more decorous space: the 1,200-seat Bovard Auditorium at USC. The show paired the English superstar with students from the Thornton School of Music for stately renditions of hits like "Levon" and "Your Song," as well as a handful of thoughtful new tunes (including one about Oscar Wilde)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
It seems fitting that one of the earliest scenes in the premiere episode of ABC's music drama series "Nashville" is set in a recording studio. An excited producer tweaks the controls on the mixing board during a session with a bratty young country-pop singer. He drops everything out of the sound mix but her voice, which is noticeably off-pitch. "Don't worry," the producer says, "we can fix that. " The singer's manager, sitting nearby on a couch reading, nonchalantly responds, "Thank God for Auto-Tune.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Musician T Bone Burnett has sold his Brentwood home for $2.75 million, the Multiple Listing Service shows. The Cape Cod-inspired house, built in 1945, features four bedrooms, four bathrooms and 3,090 square feet of living space. French doors off the family room, which has a bar, open to a garden. There is a swimming pool and a spa. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article said T Bone Burnett has worked with John Elton. The musician has worked with Elton John.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2011 | Geoff Boucher
Why do so many of us smirk when a Hollywood movie star picks up a guitar and walks toward a live microphone? Maybe it's because, as songwriter Harlan Howard once said, music is about "three chords and the truth" and, really, an actor's day job is about the closest you can come to lying for a living. The question brought a sage smile to the 61-year-old face of Jeff Bridges, the Oscar winner who this week will release his first major-label album, a 10-song collection from Blue Note/EMI called "Jeff Bridges.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Not so long ago it would have been a dream come true for sisters Laura and Lydia Rogers of Muscle Shoals, Ala., to find themselves sitting in the balcony of Nashville's historic Ryman Auditorium and looking down upon their country music heroes onstage at the longtime home of the Grand Ole Opry. After all, less than two years ago Laura had never even ridden in a plane, much less visited country music's premiere live performance venue. But when the siblings settled in on a recent spring day onto one of the Ryman's wooden benches, which have been polished for decades by the backsides of countless country music enthusiasts, it was simply an interlude, one that pales in comparison to the surreal highlights they've experienced since the October release of their self-titled debut album, "The Secret Sisters.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
It's a tall order for any musician to one-up Bob Dylan, but John Mellencamp may have pulled it off in February when he and Dylan were invited to perform at the White House as part of a salute to music of the civil rights era. "Bob was nervous," Mellencamp said during a question-answer-performance session Tuesday at the Grammy Museum, which coordinated the White House event. When a few of the 200 members of the museum audience chuckled at the comment, Mellencamp added, "No, he was really nervous.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010
Jakob Dylan "Women and Country" (Columbia Records) 1/2 The son of a legend, Jakob Dylan would seemingly have all the cred one could need. But after five albums with the modern rock outfit the Wallflowers, each with a declining chart impact, and one rather quiet solo acoustic effort with 2008's "Seeing Things," a creative and career revitalization is in order. Teaming with alt-country scorchers Neko Case and Kelly Hogan certainly can't hurt the effort. Add a former collaborator and veteran producer in T Bone Burnett, and the resulting "Women and Country" is as rootsy and elegant as all the aforementioned résumés would foretell.
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
As an actor, Jeff Bridges followed his Oscar-winning turn as down-but-not-out country singer Bad Blake in "Crazy Heart" with an Oscar-nominated spin as down-but-not-out lawman Rooster Cogburn in "True Grit. " Now comes the news that Bridges will pick up a guitar once more, not for "Crazy Heart II," but for an album slated to be produced by his longtime friend, producer and "Crazy Heart" prime mover T Bone Burnett. Bridges has signed with Blue Note Records and is scheduled to release his major-label debut album late this summer, according to a statement released Tuesday by Blue Note.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
It's a tall order for any musician to one-up Bob Dylan, but John Mellencamp may have pulled it off in February when he and Dylan were invited to perform at the White House as part of a salute to music of the civil rights era. "Bob was nervous," Mellencamp said during a question-answer-performance session Tuesday at the Grammy Museum, which coordinated the White House event. When a few of the 200 members of the museum audience chuckled at the comment, Mellencamp added, "No, he was really nervous.
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