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BUSINESS
September 21, 1995
1900 -- AT&T becomes the parent company of American Bell. Early 1900s -- Seeking a monopoly, AT&T refuses to allow rival phone companies to connect to its network until they sell out to AT&T. 1910 -- AT&T gains effective control of Western Union, its biggest telephone competitor. 1913 -- Under threat of an antitrust lawsuit, AT&T agrees to dispose of Western Union stock and not to buy other independent phone companies without government approval.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 2003 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Global Crossing Ltd., the telecommunications firm that symbolized the industry's rise, excess and ultimate collapse, may soon emerge as a battered survivor -- a feat few thought possible when the company sought bankruptcy protection nearly two years ago. The company could wrap up its Chapter 11 reorganization as early as this week, with one man being hailed as the tough-minded executive who made it possible: Chief Executive John J. Legere.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2002 | Bloomberg News
AT&T Corp. appointed President David Dorman and Chief Financial Officer Charles Noski to its board as the biggest U.S. long-distance phone company prepares to separate its cable-television business. Noski, 49, also was named vice chairman and will remain CFO. The appointments take effect immediately.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1999
AT&T Corp. got clearance from the Justice Department to buy IBM Corp.'s global communications network for $5 billion, with no conditions attached. AT&T says it could receive $2.5 billion in additional revenue in the first full year of operating the network.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One year after a pipe-bomb exploded in a crowded park during the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, FBI agents seem no closer to solving the crime. Although they have pursued more than 13,000 leads resulting from public appeals for information, no arrests have been made. In fact, their only suspect so far proved to be a public relations disaster. That was Richard Jewell, a 34-year-old private security guard who was hounded by the media until he was officially cleared three months later.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing one of the worst flops in corporate-merger history, Quaker Oats Co. agreed Thursday to sell Snapple Beverage Corp. to Triarc Cos. for $300 million, only 27 months after Quaker spent $1.7 billion to buy the maker of trendy drinks. The Quaker-Snapple fiasco joins such ill-fated business marriages as AT&T Corp. and computer maker NCR and General Electric Co. and defunct brokerage house Kidder, Peabody & Co.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
AT&T Corp. shareholders approved the company's $16-billion acquisition by SBC Communications Inc., which would create one of the world's largest phone companies. The merger has won regulatory approval in 26 states and still needs OKs from 10 additional states and the federal government. If it is approved, closing is expected late this year or early next year.
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