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T E Lawrence

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Valentine Vester, who witnessed history as the proprietor of the storied American Colony Hotel in Jerusalem, died June 15. She was 96. Vester spent the last years of her life in an apartment on the manicured grounds of the hotel, which sits on the dividing line between the city's Arab and Jewish sections. For decades, the hotel has served as a favorite hangout for diplomats and foreign correspondents and as a backdrop for political intrigue. Israeli and Palestinian negotiators secretly drafted parts of the Oslo peace accords at the hotel, in Room 16. Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, now an international Mideast envoy, has a suite of rooms on the top floor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1999
For fans of the extended instrumental jams that have earned Phish its loyal following, there's no more mind-bending a way to wrap up the summer's final weekend than with a dose of Phish under the Orange County stars. * Phish, Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre, 8808 Irvine Center Drive, Irvine. 7 p.m. $23. (949) 855-2863. noon: Festival Everybody samba! It's Brazil's independence day, and that means it's time for a Brazilian Street Carnaval.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adventure movies don't often deal with anti-climaxes, and "Lawrence of Arabia" didn't dwell long on T.E. Lawrence's post-warrior life, for obvious reasons. Still, there's a certain depressing fascination in the clean-up after a battle, and in the mire of bureaucracy that follows any large-scale action.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you love movies, but can't stand the crowds lining up for the newest summer releases, there are plenty of local alternatives in the week ahead. First on the schedule is Saturday's Classic Cinema night at the Thousand Oaks Library, featuring the original 1962 version of "Lawrence of Arabia." The epic motion picture, starring Peter O'Toole, Alec Guiness, Anthony Quinn, Claude Rains and Omar Sharif, picked up seven Academy Awards, including those for Best Picture and Best Director (David Lean).
BOOKS
July 22, 1990 | ALEX RAKSIN
Doug Peacock experienced just the kind of absurd Vietnam mishaps made legendary by filmmakers such as Oliver Stone: One day, he tried to keep his commander alive while American helicopters mistakenly rained bombs from above; the next, he watched his entire platoon fire rounds at an unarmed, but "suspicious" 10-year-old.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Adventure movies don't often deal with anticlimaxes, and "Lawrence of Arabia" didn't dwell long on T. E. Lawrence's post-warrior life, for obvious reasons. Still, there's a certain depressing fascination in the clean-up after a battle, and in the mire of bureaucracy that follows any large-scale action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1986 | Richard Buffum
John Randle, the tall, rangy proprietor of the distinguished Whittington Press in the west of England, is impressed with the amount of private presses and the quality of their work in Southern California--Ward Ritchie's in Laguna Beach for one. "I'm afraid most people aren't aware that this area has become a world center, in fact, a key area, of private presses. The booksellers and collectors are here in numbers to encourage fine printing," he told me the other day.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran character actor Arthur Kennedy--who played roles ranging from the dreamy idealist to the cynical heel in more than 70 movies and was a five-time Oscar nominee--has died of cancer in Branford, Conn., a family friend said Saturday. Kennedy, 75, died Friday night at the Connecticut Hospital in Branford, where he had been admitted in October, said Allan Nixon, a longtime friend and fellow actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2009 | Jon Burlingame
From the mystical overtones of "Ghost" to the primitive sounds of "Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome," to the Russian balalaikas in "Doctor Zhivago," composer Maurice Jarre always seemed to find the right signature for every film he scored. And unlike so many of today's thundering but essentially interchangeable big-orchestra-plus-electronics scores, the voice of a Maurice Jarre film was always uniquely his own.
NEWS
July 25, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Film preservation is a growth industry these days, with the UCLA Film and Television Archive far from alone in restoring and preserving fiction and nonfiction films. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Academy Film Archive collection of 15,000 titles includes films from the early days of motion pictures, documentaries and Oscar-winning and nominated films.
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