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T Jefferson Parker

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After helping put Orange County on the literary map with "Laguna Heat," "Little Saigon" and five other county-set mysteries over the past two decades, longtime resident T. Jefferson Parker has packed up and moved to San Diego County. Parker, who had lived in Orange County since his family moved to Tustin from Los Angeles in 1959 when he was 5, sold his Laguna Canyon home of 11 years at the end of January.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Mike Downey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Raylan A Novel Elmore Leonard William Morrow: 261 pp., $26.99 The Jaguar A Charlie Hood Novel T. Jefferson Parker Dutton: 359 pp., $26.95 A watermelon picker, Vince Majestyk. A bail bondsman, Max Cherry. A bank robber, Jack Foley. A mean hombre , John Russell. A deadeye lawman, Bob Valdez. The villainous heroes and heroic villains of Elmore Leonard's imagination have come in countless forms - some, such as these, brought to life in motion pictures by Charles Bronson, Robert Forster, George Clooney, Paul Newman and Burt Lancaster, good good guy/bad guy portrayers all. Ordered at gunpoint to identify my favorite Leonard do-badders of 40 books and beyond, I might need to score it a tie between Chili Palmer, a loan shark-turned-Hollywood player in "Get Shorty," and a newspaper reporter from its sequel, "Be Cool," who turns up in the last chapter, "Mike Downey of the Los Angeles Times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2011 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to the crime-based fiction that long has played such an important role in the literary life of Los Angeles, we're living through what amounts to a golden age. The dark ecstasies of James Ellroy, Michael Connelly's artful probing of the inner monologue, Joe Wambaugh's explorations of black comedy as morality play, Walter Mosley's blend of empathy and formal ambition and T. Jefferson Parker's propulsive but pitch-perfect works of...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2004 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
After writing 12 novels in nearly 20 years set in the stretch of the Sun Belt south of Los Angeles, T. Jefferson Parker has earned the title of bard of Orange County. He's familiar with all that is shabby and grandiose about the area, knows it intimately enough to see past the Jane Jacobs nightmare of sterile industrial parks, socially engineered gated communities and party-hearty beach towns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
T. Jefferson Parker, the best-selling Laguna Beach mystery writer who moved to Fallbrook in north San Diego County earlier this year, will make a trek back to his old stamping grounds this week for a series of signings for his latest Orange County-set mystery. The new novel, "Red Light," deals with the investigation of a murdered prostitute and is set in San Clemente, Santa Ana and Modjeska Canyon.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Novelist T. Jefferson Parker trudged back and forth between his Laguna Beach hillside house and his Ford Bronco, carrying his most prized possessions: family photos, a few treasured books, five snakes and three dogs. Just hours earlier, Parker had been pounding away at his typewriter and watching the thick, roiling smoke miles away.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2008 | Will Beall, Special to The Times
After 14 novels behind the Orange Curtain, T. Jefferson Parker has come north to do some business with a big iron on his hip. "L.A. Outlaws," Parker's first novel set in Los Angeles, is at once a noir thriller and a western ballad of desperadoes and doomed lovers. The book is both hard-boiled and heartbreaking, Ross Macdonald as sung by Marty Robbins.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2007 | Meghan Daum, Special to The Times
A Southern California native, T. Jefferson Parker grew up in Tustin in the 1960s and '70s, graduated from UC Irvine, worked as a reporter at the Newport Ensign and the Daily Pilot and, in 1985, became a bestselling crime writer with his first novel, "Laguna Heat."
NEWS
September 5, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
T. Jefferson Parker passes by the scene of the crime every day while driving through picturesque Laguna Canyon between his home in Laguna Beach and his job in Irvine. It's on Laguna Canyon Road that homicide detective Tom Shephard drove that early August morning after Tim Algernon's body was discovered--his face and body burned beyond recognition, a blackened rock protruding from his forehead and more than a thousand dollars in bills stuffed down his throat.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2010
Iron River A Novel T. Jefferson Parker Dutton: 374 pp., $26.95
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2008 | Will Beall, Special to The Times
After 14 novels behind the Orange Curtain, T. Jefferson Parker has come north to do some business with a big iron on his hip. "L.A. Outlaws," Parker's first novel set in Los Angeles, is at once a noir thriller and a western ballad of desperadoes and doomed lovers. The book is both hard-boiled and heartbreaking, Ross Macdonald as sung by Marty Robbins.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2007 | Meghan Daum, Special to The Times
A Southern California native, T. Jefferson Parker grew up in Tustin in the 1960s and '70s, graduated from UC Irvine, worked as a reporter at the Newport Ensign and the Daily Pilot and, in 1985, became a bestselling crime writer with his first novel, "Laguna Heat."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2006 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
MAYBE the California crime novel had nowhere else to go. Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler and Ross Macdonald established its hard-boiled style, which a thousand imitators turned into a collection of cliches. Then James Ellroy went way beyond hard-boiled, to blackened and smoking at the bottom of a bone-dry saucepan. Nobody could beat that, so when T.
BOOKS
December 26, 2004 | Dick Lochte, Dick Lochte is a critic of crime fiction and the coauthor, with Christopher Darden, of the legal thriller "Lawless."
The 12th novel of T. Jefferson Parker, clearly his most ambitious, covers 50 years in the lives of the surviving Becker brothers of Tustin -- the dogged homicide detective Nick, crime reporter and budding novelist Andy, and David, the man of God. (A fourth sibling, Carl, is a Vietnam casualty.) It meticulously tracks their loss of youth and innocence while observing the changes, none for the better, that have taken place in what was once an easygoing, fruitful conservative paradise.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2004 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
After writing 12 novels in nearly 20 years set in the stretch of the Sun Belt south of Los Angeles, T. Jefferson Parker has earned the title of bard of Orange County. He's familiar with all that is shabby and grandiose about the area, knows it intimately enough to see past the Jane Jacobs nightmare of sterile industrial parks, socially engineered gated communities and party-hearty beach towns.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
T. Jefferson Parker's moody new mystery thriller, "Pacific Beat," is the author's most complexly plotted novel to date, a tale of murder, intrigue and family secrets set in Newport Beach. Acknowledging that "Pacific Beat," due in bookstores next week, "is really a pretty dark book," Parker says he drew on what was happening in his life at the time "to bring an emotional truth and resonance to the story." "Pacific Beat," says Parker, was written "under duress."
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meet Tim Hess, a recently retired 67-year-old Orange County Sheriff's Department homicide detective who is battling lung cancer--and boredom. Called back to active duty when a serial killer takes another victim, Hess is teamed up with a brash, much younger, second-generation cop with a driving ambition to one day be elected sheriff-coroner in T. Jefferson Parker's latest mystery novel. Hess and Merci Rayborn have their hands full in "The Blue Hour" (Hyperion; $23.
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