Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsT Timothy Jr Ryan
IN THE NEWS

T Timothy Jr Ryan

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 15, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's chief thrift regulator said Thursday that unless Congress quickly approves more funds for the savings and loan cleanup, the government will be forced to seize troubled thrifts previously slated for taxpayer-assisted sales. Timothy Ryan, director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, said such action would cause the cost of the thrift bailout to "explode" because the government would be forced to pass up potential opportunities to find private buyers immediately for troubled thrifts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 9, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top thrift regulator will announce his resignation today in a speech in which he will warn that the nation is suffering from a credit crunch because of "a climate of fear" generated by the savings and loan crisis. Timothy Ryan says he will quit after 2 1/2 years as director of the Office of Thrift Supervision on Dec. 4. Ryan's departure is not a surprise because he had previously announced plans to leave the post after the 1992 presidential election.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 29, 1992 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
The nation's top thrift regulator said Tuesday in Washington that the failure of San Diego-based Homefed Bank is likely to cost taxpayers more than $2 billion, and the costs continue to mount daily. The statement by T. Timothy Ryan Jr., director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, before a House banking subcommittee, suggests that the ultimate price tag of the collapse will greatly exceed the $2.6-billion cost of Lincoln Savings & Loan, the most expensive failure to date.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
T. Timothy Ryan Jr., President Bush's hastily named nominee to regulate savings and loan associations, ran into a barrage of criticism Wednesday from senators who said he is unqualified to help direct the massive rescue of the thrift industry. Ryan, a pension lawyer and former Labor Department official, told skeptical members of the Senate Banking Committee that he was drafted for the S&L job four weeks ago by Treasury officials.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, warning that delays in seizing insolvent savings and loan associations could cost taxpayers millions of dollars, asked an appeals court on Thursday to uphold the government's takeover powers. The Administration said a lower court action Wednesday, blocking the seizure of an Illinois thrift, "may irretrievably disrupt the government's regulation of the thrift industry." U.S. District Judge Royce C.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant policy shift, the nation's top thrift regulator said Wednesday that he wants to help big savings and loan associations avoid failure through early financial intervention from the federal government.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after his nomination as the nation's top savings and loan regulator was narrowly approved by the Senate Banking Committee, T. Timothy Ryan Jr. publicly admitted that he had used marijuana and cocaine in the 1970s. Ryan had earlier disclosed his past drug use to the FBI, and the Bush Administration said Banking Committee members had been aware of that disclosure during their review of his nomination.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT
T. Timothy Ryan Jr., a Washington lawyer and former key Labor Department official, will be nominated as the nation's top savings and loan regulator, according to Bush Administration sources. Ryan would become permanent director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, which oversees the S&L industry beleaguered by the financial collapse of hundreds of insolvent institutions. "The agency needs strong leadership," said an Administration source.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top thrift regulator will announce his resignation today in a speech in which he will warn that the nation is suffering from a credit crunch because of "a climate of fear" generated by the savings and loan crisis. Timothy Ryan says he will quit after 2 1/2 years as director of the Office of Thrift Supervision on Dec. 4. Ryan's departure is not a surprise because he had previously announced plans to leave the post after the 1992 presidential election.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top thrift regulator said Wednesday that the government will seize four or five crippled savings and loan associations by the end of the week because Congress has refused to provide funds to sell the troubled institutions to private buyers. Timothy Ryan, director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, said the takeovers will continue weekly through a roster of 45 S&Ls with $38 billion in assets. He refused to identify any of the S&Ls targeted for takeover.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's chief thrift regulator said Thursday that unless Congress quickly approves more funds for the savings and loan cleanup, the government will be forced to seize troubled thrifts previously slated for taxpayer-assisted sales. Timothy Ryan, director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, said such action would cause the cost of the thrift bailout to "explode" because the government would be forced to pass up potential opportunities to find private buyers immediately for troubled thrifts.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1991 | BETH HAWKINS and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
L. William Seidman's replacement won't be wearing his two hats, as a bank regulator at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and as a savings and loan asset salesman at the Resolution Trust Corp., Congressional experts and financial analysts agreed Tuesday. Congressional irritation with the Resolution Trust Corp., often deflected by Seidman, is coming into full bloom.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant policy shift, the nation's top thrift regulator said Wednesday that he wants to help big savings and loan associations avoid failure through early financial intervention from the federal government.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate handed President Bush an important victory Wednesday by confirming T. Timothy Ryan Jr. as the nation's top savings and loan regulator, despite his lack of financial experience and admissions of past drug use. After a determined lobbying campaign by the Bush Administration, the Senate voted 62 to 37 to grant Ryan a five-year term as director of the Office of Thrift Supervision.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top thrift regulator said Wednesday that the government will seize four or five crippled savings and loan associations by the end of the week because Congress has refused to provide funds to sell the troubled institutions to private buyers. Timothy Ryan, director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, said the takeovers will continue weekly through a roster of 45 S&Ls with $38 billion in assets. He refused to identify any of the S&Ls targeted for takeover.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate handed President Bush an important victory Wednesday by confirming T. Timothy Ryan Jr. as the nation's top savings and loan regulator, despite his lack of financial experience and admissions of past drug use. After a determined lobbying campaign by the Bush Administration, the Senate voted 62 to 37 to grant Ryan a five-year term as director of the Office of Thrift Supervision.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration and other supporters of T. Timothy Ryan Jr., nominated as the nation's chief thrift regulator despite past marijuana and cocaine use, argued Saturday that baby boomers should be forgiven their youthful dabbling in drugs as they move into key jobs in government and business.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after his nomination as the nation's top savings and loan regulator was narrowly approved by the Senate Banking Committee, T. Timothy Ryan Jr. publicly admitted that he had used marijuana and cocaine in the 1970s. Ryan had earlier disclosed his past drug use to the FBI, and the Bush Administration said Banking Committee members had been aware of that disclosure during their review of his nomination.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|