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January 16, 1990 | Associated Press
McGraw-Hill Inc. said it has acquired TAB Books Inc., a nonfiction book publisher, for an undisclosed sum. TAB Books, based in Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., publishes books in 12 fields including computing, electronics, aviation, engineering and several how-to subjects.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | Associated Press
McGraw-Hill Inc. said it has acquired TAB Books Inc., a nonfiction book publisher, for an undisclosed sum. TAB Books, based in Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., publishes books in 12 fields including computing, electronics, aviation, engineering and several how-to subjects.
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MAGAZINE
October 22, 1989 | JUDITH SIMS
THE CLASSIC KITE, flown by generations of children on beaches across the country, was simply a shield with a tail: a piece of paper or cloth attached to a cross frame. Called a two-stick flat kite, it's still popular, but today it has a lot of competition from box kites, dragons, tetrahedrons, and, currently--the hottest things in the air--dual-line active kites.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1989 | Jane Applegate
Many entrepreneurs still believe that professional venture capitalists provide seed money for most new businesses in America. But that is a myth, according to Robert J. Gaston, author of "Finding Private Venture Capital for Your Firm." In fact, Gaston contends that professional venture capitalists--who reject about 99% of the deals they consider--invest in only 2,100 of the 600,000 new businesses opening every year in the United States. That means that most entrepreneurs are getting money from private investors or "business angels," as Gaston calls them.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | ELAINE DAVIS
Hang on to that battered Naugahyde recliner and sagging sectional--especially if they're made with hardwood frames, coil springs and metal plates. Reupholstery may be the solution for reviving and restoring quality furniture--at half the price of starting over. "Nowadays we're trying to save the trees. People are starting to keep their good furniture, and pretty soon you won't be able to buy it," said Laura Aranda-Hill, owner of Aranda's Custom Upholstery in Vista.
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