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Table Tennis

SPORTS
May 20, 2000
Leisure World Laguna Woods will host a senior table tennis tournament June 2-4, where more than 180 participants, ages 40 and older, are expected to compete for $14,000 in cash prizes in the 11th Meiklejohn National. The tournament, which will take place in Leisure World's Clubhouse Five, features 26 events. Among the top players in the four-star, USA Table Tennis-sanctioned event will be Chen Ying Hua, a former member of China's national team. For more information, call (714) 832-4388.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS
John Ryan enjoys nothing more than a good match of table tennis. So on Sunday, he drove nearly 70 miles from his home in Palmdale to Costa Mesa to watch some of the world's top-ranked players compete for $8,000 worth of prizes in the Econo Lube N' Tune Pacific Coast Open held at Orange Coast College. "I love to play the game," Ryan said. "I practice every day and even competed in some tournaments, but watching these guys lets me know that I have a long way to go."
SPORTS
February 12, 1991 | Associated Press
North and South Korea agreed Tuesday to unite for two international sports championships, marking the first time in 45 years the rival nations will play on the same side. Delegates representing the two nations agreed to field a single Korean team for the 41st World Table Tennis Championships in Japan in April and for the World Youth Soccer Championship in Portugal in June. Communist North Korea's chief delegate, Kim Hyung Jin, called the agreement "epochal."
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | TERRY SPENCER, Times Staff Writer
The streets near Compton are a long way from Shanghai, Seoul, Tokyo, Budapest and other places where table tennis is a major sport. But nestled on one of those streets near the western edge of town is the home of James D. West, who assembles customized paddles that have earned him a loyal following among Southern California's circle of about 500 serious table tennis players. "I would like to feel it's because I'm good," West said.
SPORTS
September 21, 1989 | IRENE GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
It's hard to tell that Leon Ruderman had table tennis in mind when he and a longtime architect friend designed his Manhattan Beach home about a year and a half ago. The fancy, two-story house has an Art Deco flair that makes it stick out among its neighbors on the Strand. It could easily earn a spot on "Miami Vice," if the show were still taping. "The contractors laughed," said Ruderman, "when they saw that the whole place was designed around the table tennis room."
SPORTS
June 4, 1996 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Stanley Kahan first picked up a pingpong paddle, it was made of hardwood and sandpaper. That was nearly 50 years ago and a lot has changed since then. For one thing, a good paddle is now made of sponge rubber and carbon alloy. For another, they'll laugh you out of the arena in any other country if you call it pingpong. Internationally, the game is called table tennis. Except in the United States, apparently.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | Zan Dubin Scott, Special to The Times
HERE are the trappings for some good old-fashioned fun: the unmistakable squeak of tennis shoe on gym floor; bodies alive with sweat beads and grimaces and the dainty thwack of ball on paddle. Yes, it's table tennis. And every Sunday afternoon, the tiny balls zipping back and forth at sometimes-scary velocity turn the cavernous gym at Santa Monica College into a study in Homo sapien focus and competitive zeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Dweck traveled from Westchester, N.Y., to Laguna Hills to compete in a table tennis tournament this weekend. What Dweck discovered is that 3,000 miles is a long way to go to get beaten by someone twice his age. Dweck is 42. Such are the stories at the Meiklejohn National Seniors Table Tennis Tournament at Leisure World, where anyone who mentions pingpong better be talking about panda bears or risk getting whacked with a paddle.
SPORTS
July 19, 1991 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His game belongs in a museum. "It's the old Hong-Kong-pinpoint-garage game," a man said knowingly. The reference is to the paddle being held with handle up between fore and middle fingers, rec room style. "No chance," the man said. His opponent played the hip, modified-European style--shaking hands with the paddle, using the slashing strokes of the power game. The older man stood fairly close to the table, seemingly defensive, while the kid backed up and swung from the heels.
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