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Table Tennis

SPORTS
July 13, 1992 | MARK SPINN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The men, led by Attila Malek of Costa Mesa, got their revenge at the National Seniors Open table tennis tournament Sunday at Leisure World. After 11-time U.S. women's champion Insook Bhushan won the over 40 Open title against a predominantly male field Saturday, there was plenty of good-natured ribbing going on between the sexes as Sunday's over 30 Open semifinals approached. The over 30 semis featured Bhushan against Malek and Alhambra's Wei Wang, the 1990 U.S.
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SPORTS
July 31, 1985 | PAT CANNON, Times Staff Writer
Trying to distinguish between the Gee twins has become the unofficial board game of Sports Festival VI. "Lisa is the one with her ears pierced," whispers a lady spectator. "No, now, let me think . . . I'm sorry, I don't want to steer you wrong. I better not say." A man, overhearing the conversation, chimes in: "No it's easy. Lisa wears her hair parted to the left." "No," rejoined the woman. "I was told Lisa has red shoes, and Diana the white. So that hair thing doesn't make sense at all.
SPORTS
June 6, 1997 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Table tennis might never reach a critical mass of popularity in this country, but Jimmy Jones is certainly sold. In fact Jones and his wife, Joanne, sold their Sherman Oaks home and moved to Leisure World so he could satisfy his desire to play the sport. He even went under the knife to improve his table tennis game. After living for 12 years with double vision caused by a detached retina, Jones had the problem repaired surgically in December. The bouncing ball is no longer plural.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pingpong, the game Forrest Gump helped make famous, is played by more than 60 million in China. Here, at the Centennial Olympic Games, it is called table tennis and has crowds cheering the bouncing 1 1/2-inch orange celluloid ball. Merely getting in to watch is a challenge. On the doors outside Hall D at the World Congress Center are signs that read: "Please observe this is an air-lock door." Only a small number of people at a time are allowed through the first set of doors.
SPORTS
June 27, 1994 | JODY BERGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After easily dispatching each opponent all day, Dan Seemiller was pressed to his limits in the five-game final match of the National Seniors Open table tennis tournament Sunday at Leisure World. Seemiller, a five-time national champion from Pittsburgh playing in his first seniors event, trailed Atilla Malek, 13-10, in the final game. "I had blown a couple of those points on little things and I thought, 'OK, if you're going to lose, don't let it be like this,' " Seemiller said.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1985 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A senior Soviet official charges that the United States raises higher trade barriers than any other nation in the world. The allegation was made last week at a briefing for reporters by Nikolai Smelyakov, the Soviet Union's deputy foreign trade minister. "It is very difficult to do business with the United States," Smelyakov said. "We want to work with American firms, but we're not sure even if we sign a contract that we will get deliveries."
SPORTS
July 4, 1994 | JODY BERGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a battle of teammates, Linghui Kong defeated Liu Guoliang in straight sets to win the men's singles division of the U.S. Open Table Tennis Championships on Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center. The sixth-seeded Kong, a member of China's national team, opened an 8-0 lead over the second-seeded Guoliang, also a member of the national team. Kong, 19, repeatedly sent smashes that forced the 18-year-old Guoliang back from the table.
SPORTS
August 3, 1989 | DONNA CARTER, Times Staff Writer
About five years ago, Terry Timmins caught a fever he hasn't been able to shake. He has fed it religiously, but it just seems to grow hotter. Timmins, 46, has table tennis fever. When he doesn't play the sport for a week, he says he has withdrawal pangs. "If you start gravitating and turning your car to one of the 25 table tennis clubs in Southern California when you know you should be doing something else like going to work, or studying, then you've got the fever," Timmins said.
WORLD
August 16, 2008 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Anybody wanting to discover the secret of China's success at table tennis need only meet Li Zhuoming, a 10-year-old prodigy. With a paddle in his hand, he is bursting with explosive energy; off the court he is uncommonly poised for a pre-adolescent. He holds his 4-foot-11 body erect when he speaks and makes eye contact. Except when wiping the beads of sweat dripping under his crisp bush cut, he doesn't fidget. Table tennis, known as pingpang in China, isn't a game for the inattentive.
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