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Table Tennis

NEWS
January 23, 1998 | MICHAEL FRANK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Man Who Ate Everything," lawyer-turned-food writer Jeffrey Steingarten has collected 40 essays, most of which first appeared in Vogue magazine, and only a reader with a hard heart, an incurious stomach or a hopelessly dormant sense of humor will fail to be charmed and captivated by his exhaustive exploration of all things gustatory. Steingarten's distinguishing characteristic, as a writer and an eater, is his thoroughness.
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SPORTS
June 9, 1997 | MELANIE NEFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The finals of the Meiklejohn National Seniors Table Tennis tournament over-40 division offered the same two players as last year. The outcome was the same as well. Second-seeded Atilla Malek of Costa Mesa quickly lost to top-seeded Tong Sheng Huang, 21-16, 21-5, 22-20, Sunday at Leisure World. Maryland's Huang, 41, picked up a check for $1,200. Last year Huang won, 21-14, 21-18, 26-24.
SPORTS
June 7, 1997
Tong Sheng Huang of Maryland, seeded first in the Senior Elite division of the Meiklejohn National Seniors Table Tennis Tournament, defeated Atilla Malek of Costa Mesa Friday in the first day of competition. Huang beat Malek, 21-16, 21-16, to advance to the next round. In the men's over-80 division, Ivan Slade of San Diego advanced after defeating Long Beach's Henry Swain, 21-17, 21-16. Slade, also playing in the over-75 division, won his match against Fred Borges, 21-14, 21-12.
SPORTS
June 6, 1997 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Table tennis might never reach a critical mass of popularity in this country, but Jimmy Jones is certainly sold. In fact Jones and his wife, Joanne, sold their Sherman Oaks home and moved to Leisure World so he could satisfy his desire to play the sport. He even went under the knife to improve his table tennis game. After living for 12 years with double vision caused by a detached retina, Jones had the problem repaired surgically in December. The bouncing ball is no longer plural.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Taking a couple of deep breaths first, John Binelli smashed the ball over the net, adding enough spin to wipe out his opponent's chance for victory. Marianne Javorka, 71, conceded defeat to the 70-year-old Binelli, who also beat two teen contenders to move into the finals of the Fullerton Senior Multi-Service Center's third annual Bridging the Gap Ping-Pong Tournament. Despite working up a sweat, Binelli finally met his match: J.R.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | Times Wire Services
It looked like Chinese table tennis practice, and why not? Kong Linghui and Liu Guoliang came out and high-fived Lu Lin and Wang Tao, then beat them for the Olympic men's doubles gold medal, 21-8, 18-21, 21-19, 21-17. In the doubles final, all the players knew each other well. Kong beat Liu for the world singles title last year and teamed with Wang for the world doubles championship. The title match turned quickly in the first set at 11-5, when Wang twisted his right ankle.
NEWS
July 30, 1996
China's Deng Yapeng and Qiao Hong retained their Olympic table tennis doubles crown and moved closer to repeating their Barcelona medals sweep by winning places in the singles semifinals. Deng and Qiao, the world champions, beat compatriots Liu Wei and Qiao Yunping, 18-21, 25-23, 22-20, 21-14, for the doubles gold medal. Later both Deng and Qiao advanced to the semifinals of the women's singles, in which they won gold and silver medals, respectively, in Barcelona.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pingpong, the game Forrest Gump helped make famous, is played by more than 60 million in China. Here, at the Centennial Olympic Games, it is called table tennis and has crowds cheering the bouncing 1 1/2-inch orange celluloid ball. Merely getting in to watch is a challenge. On the doors outside Hall D at the World Congress Center are signs that read: "Please observe this is an air-lock door." Only a small number of people at a time are allowed through the first set of doors.
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