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NEWS
October 26, 1996 | From Associated Press
An 11-year-old honor student who packed a knife in her lunch box to cut a piece of chicken has been suspended and arrested on charges of having a weapon at school. "Mom was busy, and Dad had gone to work," Charlotte Kirk said, explaining why she packed the smooth-edged steak knife with her leftover peas, chicken and apple on Oct. 18.
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HEALTH
November 3, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Chopsticks, with a history that dates 5,000 years, provide a simple and neat way to get small bites of food to your mouth. They also may contribute to arthritis in the fingers. A study of 2,500 elderly residents of Beijing who had used chopsticks throughout a lifetime of eating and cooking has linked the mechanical stress of manipulating chopsticks with osteoarthritis of the thumb, index and middle fingers.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do you fumble with chopsticks, dropping food midway between plate and mouth before surrendering to the good old fork? If so, take heart. Research shows that even the Japanese are forgetting the ancient art of eating with two sticks. "Japanese have been using chopsticks for more than 1,300 years, and it's a representative cultural asset," said Masaaki Yatagai, a children's education specialist at Mejiro Gakuen Women's College. "Yet, Japanese today can't use chopsticks properly at all."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury took just 20 minutes to find Steven Douglas Mattson guilty of stealing flatware from a department store, then trying to return the knives and forks for a $161.61 refund. Mattson, who represented himself during the three-day trial, was convicted Wednesday of felony burglary and petty theft with a prior, charges that typically carry a prison sentence of 16 months to three years.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | KATHRYN BOLD, Kathryn Bold is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
OK, so Bing never dreamed of a mauve Christmas. That doesn't mean you can't use mauve, and many other colors not associated with the yuletide, to decorate the holiday table. Setting a festive table, according to Orange County decorators, requires imagination--visions of sugar plums, fine china, matching silverware and a smashing centerpiece. They encourage hosts to use color and table ornaments in new ways.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1992 | JACK SEARLES
The recession has given an edge to Damco, an Ojai-based producer of high-quality cutlery. "People are eating out less, but at the same time they're taking more interest in preparing food at home," said Bernd Dressler, the company's president. "This has improved the market for our knives and other kitchen implements." Dressler cited the eat-at-home trend as a major reason for Damco's worldwide sales having increased 40% in the past year.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a certain poetry about the knives crafted by Tokifusa Iizuka, one of the most revered smiths in a land that holds hocho--kitchen knives--sacred. His knives are simple and rustic yet, at the same time, elegant. Light dances upon smooth blades and the delicate, wavelike pattern of steel folded many times within. Wedges of black buffalo horn connect the rounded, unvarnished wood handles to the polished blade in a sensuous mix of textures.
HOME & GARDEN
November 27, 2003 | Adamo DiGregorio and David A. Keeps, Special to The Times
Whether you're serving up a Thanksgiving Butterball or tofurkey, or attempting to spiral-slice a Christmas ham, there's nothing more Norman Rockwell than the holiday meal. On these occasions we do not cut our food, we carve it, with special tools that make it a small piece of dinner theater. In the world of cutlery, there is a special place for the carving set. Usually not housed in a knife block, the condominium complex of kitchen knives, it tends to reside in its original "presentation box."
HOME & GARDEN
July 20, 1991 | VALERIE ORLEANS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You probably know that the fork is always placed to the left of the plate, and the knife and spoon to the right, but did you know that plates should be exactly one inch from the table edge? Or that the water glass should always be at the tip of the knife? And that the glass and cup should be straight across from each other? These are just a few of the "rules" for properly setting a table.
HOME & GARDEN
February 7, 2008 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
CONSIDER this humble sugar shaker, a staple of kitchens and coffee shops across the land. About 35 million have been sold -- maybe double that if you include all the knockoffs -- and not one of them labeled a work of art. Yet that's exactly what they are, says design historian Bill Stern, a connoisseur of ubiquitous and unsung objects. "This decanter is iconic," he says, "the very essence of modernism, a perfect meld of function and form."
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