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BUSINESS
May 29, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is redesigning the Gmail inbox to ease some of the frustration of sorting through emails on the desktop and on mobile devices. A new version of Gmail automatically groups and then delivers incoming emails in five different categories --  primary, social, promotions, updates and forums. The idea is to be able to see what's new in your inbox at a glance. It's a feature that many of Gmail's more than 425 million users, overwhelmed by the daily onslaught of messages, have been clamoring for. "We get a lot of different types of email: messages from friends, social notifications, deals and offers, confirmations and receipts, and more.
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SPORTS
April 25, 2013 | By Chris Foster
UCLA's spring game Saturday was going to cost UCLA students $7 for the bus ride to the Rose Bowl. Then Bruins Coach Jim Mora stepped in. And then athletic department officials rethought the matter. Mora had volunteered to pay for students' bus fare to the game, Josh Rebholz , UCLA associate athletic director of development, said on his Twitter account Wednesday night. On Thursday afternoon, athletic department officials decided to pick up the tab for the trip to the Rose Bowl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2013 | Steve Lopez
For more than half of my 38 years in the news business, I've been a member of a union, though I'm not currently. And my late father was a proud Teamster for decades. So I appreciate the goods that unions deliver to nearly 15 million members in the United States: living wages and good benefits. Workplace safety. A measure of job security. And protection against management abuse. In other words, don't count me among those who vilify organized labor, which in many parts of the country offers the best hope for hanging on to a place in the middle class.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
CODY, Wyo. - For many, the federal budget ax that fell last month has meant a few nicks here and there. For Joe Kondelis, it's sliced a lot deeper. After stewing for days, the 53-year-old opened his wallet and delivered a $2,000 check to the Cody Chamber of Commerce to help pay for snowplowing at Yellowstone National Park. It wasn't easy. Cash is scarce once Yellowstone shuts down for the winter. But after automatic spending cuts idled the National Park Service plows and threatened to delay opening day for two weeks - two weeks that could cost his beer distributorship $100,000 in sales - Kondelis felt he had no choice.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Karin Klein
A decent whistle costs about a buck and weighs practically nothing. Had one been carried by the two young adults who spent four days lost in the Trabuco Canyon area, it could have saved thousands of dollars in search and rescue costs; it might have saved the pair from trips to the hospitals. It might have even prevented one rescuer from being injured in a fall. Reading the comment boards on the stories about the college students who got lost in Holy Jim Canyon, a side canyon to Trabuco, on Easter Day - aside from the judgmental buffoons who have decided that the young man is an obviously shifty sort because he wears earrings and is thus inadequate to the task of hiking - I see a lot of knowledgeable head-shaking among hikers, lists of the items no hiker should be without.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - When it comes to the nation's debt, payback time might be here. Years of low tax rates and rising federal spending, amplified by the devastating economic effect of the Great Recession, have driven the U.S. borrowing tab to more than $16 trillion from less than $1 trillion in 1981. Deficit reduction has become the dominant issue in Washington. The first major tax increase since 1993 took place last month. And large automatic spending cuts - $1.2 trillion over the next decade - are set to kick in Friday.
SPORTS
February 22, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
When New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski throws a Super Bowl party, he spares no expense.  For this year's bowl bash, Gronkowski ran up a $9,000 tab. How do you spend $9,000 on a party? Well, start with $1,575 worth of Grey Goose vodka and $1,250 of PJ Rose champagne. Add in other assorted alcoholic beverages and some Red Bull, and then a $1,400 tip.  Of course, to Gronkowski, spending $9,000 is like a regular person spending $10. He did, after all, make $2.6 million last season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2013 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
The city that gave birth to Little Saigon is unable to help pay for the annual Tet parade and is asking residents to quickly ramp up a fundraising effort to save an event marking the Lunar New Year. A colorful pageant that draws tens of thousands, the parade dates back nearly 30 years in Westminster. It has been one of the enduring city celebrations since Vietnamese refugees began to flock here after the fall of Saigon in 1975. The event was discontinued after parade organizers lost money in 2004 but was revived four years later when the city again infused it with cash.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
Burger King's biggest franchise holder, Carrols Restaurant Group,   reportedly has agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle claims of sexual harassment. The settlement, Reuters reported, brings to an end a 14-year lawsuit involving 88 women who formerly worked for Carrols and one current female employee . The company, which owns and operates more than 520 Burger King locations, denies guilt, citing legal costs as the reason for settling.  The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleged that employees harassed women by making obscene comments, exposing their genitalia and subjecting the women to strip searches, unwanted touching and even rape, The Examiner reported.
NATIONAL
December 12, 2012 | David Zucchino
When Amber Oberg left the U.S. Army after eight years of active duty, her timing seemed perfect. Congress was creating a Post-9/11 GI Bill, with generous payments for veterans seeking higher education. But a month into her first semester at UC Davis, Oberg has yet to receive her tuition, housing and book money from the Department of Veterans Affairs. "I didn't expect to get out of the military and then have to wait and wait for the education money that was promised me," said Oberg, a single mother of two. She said she went back to school after a personal bankruptcy and the loss of her home to foreclosure.
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