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SPORTS
October 7, 1989
I would like to commend Julie Cart for her recent articles regarding the unconscionable exploits of The Athletics Congress. Perhaps some day the truth will come out about TAC in a public forum. It obviously won't come out of a clandestine, self-serving TAC meeting. I believe that talk of lawsuits to be brought against Darrell Robinson by Florence Griffith-Joyner and Carl Lewis is simply rhetoric and empty threats. If either sues, the truth is likely to come out with the subpoenaing of athletes, coaches, doctors and others involved with drug use. Until this issue is brought to court, the truth will come only in the form of a TAC "investigation," and we know how reliable those are. RON MILFORD, Burbank
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NATIONAL
December 27, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - A closely watched ballot measure that would set the minimum wage at $15 an hour for certain workers in the small city of SeaTac was dealt another setback late Friday, when a superior court judge ruled that the proposition would not affect employees at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Proposition 1, which passed Nov. 5 with a 77-vote margin and survived a recount, would have given more than 6,000 workers at big hotels, airport concessions, airport parking lots and large rental car companies a 63% raise and granted them paid sick leave.
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SPORTS
November 28, 1989
Marathoner Jeff Scuffins, quarter-miler Willie Caldwell and shotputter Tom Huminik were suspended Monday by The Athletics Congress for drug use. Caldwell, of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Huminik, who attends North Carolina State, each were given two-year suspensions, while Scuffins, of Hagerstown, Md., was suspended for three months. The suspensions were effective immediately.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The approach lights at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport went out while the runways were shrouded in heavy fog, forcing 21 incoming flights to be diverted or grounded. No flights landed at Sea-Tac for nearly two hours, airport spokesman Bob Parker said. Some flights were grounded at their point of origin, and others were diverted to Bellingham; Wenatchee; Portland, Ore.; and Victoria and Vancouver, Canada. The lights went out after a part failed, the FAA said.
SPORTS
June 21, 1989
Carl Lewis and three Santa Monica Track Club teammates will not compete in a European meet this weekend between the United States, the Soviet Union, West Germany and Great Britain. British officials in Birmingham, England, said they were barred by The Athletics Congress, but TAC official Pete Cava said the TAC had no power to bar anyone from a meet on British soil. Cava said the British promoters had to choose between the officially sanctioned U.S. team or the sprinters. Lewis and the others--Olympic 200-meter champion Joe DeLoach, Danny Everett and Floyd Heard--had planned to try to break the world record in the 800 relay Friday and Saturday.
SPORTS
May 24, 1989
Sprinters Mark Witherspoon and Floyd Heard were reprimanded by The Athletics Congress for failing to compete for the U.S. team in the World Games last March in Budapest, Hungary. The sprinters, who train in Houston, also will be ineligible for financial aid from TAC for a year.
SPORTS
June 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Athletics Congress has delayed the start of a year-round drug-testing program for track and field in the United States four months until Oct. 1 because more time is needed to train the people who will be collecting samples, officials announced today. The executive committee of TAC, the national governing body for the sport, voted this week to delay the scheduled July 1 start of the program because officials still are negotiating with a national health care corporation and with a major public accounting firm over their participation in the program, officials said.
SPORTS
May 3, 1989
Hurdler Tonie Campbell has been suspended for three months by The Athletics Congress for failing to appear for a mandatory drug test. Campbell, bronze medalist in the Seoul Olympics, was originally suspended by a hearing panel and given 30 days to appeal. When no appeal was received by TAC, the suspension--retroactive to March 11 and running through June 9--was upheld. Campbell cited fixed flight arrangements for not appearing for the test at a meet in Fairfax, Va., on Feb. 5.
SPORTS
June 21, 1992 | JULIE CART
* Aug. 12, 1990--Reynolds tests positive for nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, at Herculis '90 meet in Monte Carlo. * June 10, 1991--Reynolds wins in USOC arbitration, with American Arbitration Assn. hearing the case. This allows him to compete in U.S. Championships at New York. The IAAF threatens to ban the U.S. team from the World Championships in August. Reynolds runs, but does not make the team. IAAF backs down on threat. * Oct.
SPORTS
June 20, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Olympic champion Carl Lewis and three club teammates on an 800-meter relay team were barred from an international track meet this weekend by the sport's U.S. governing body, British officials said today. The British Amateur Athletics Board said it had been told by The Athletics Congress, U.S. track's ruling federation, that Lewis and three other members of the Santa Monica Track Club had been refused permission to compete. TAC denied, however, that it banned the athletes. "We don't have the power to ban athletes at a meet on British soil," Pete Cava, a public information spokesman for TAC, said at the organization's headquarters in Indianapolis.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1999 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS
Pacific Bell Wireless and Motorola, swamped with complaints over malfunctioning StarTac wireless phones in California, have been urging customers to come into nearby stores for a "free tuneup" for their phone. But customers get more than a tuneup. At the PacBell Wireless stores, Motorola representatives are replacing each customer's StarTac 7000 or the more expensive StarTac 8000 model phone with "remanufactured" versions--and tossing the turned-in phones in large boxes.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1999 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some digital versions of Motorola's popular StarTac mobile phones have had technical problems so severe that Pacific Bell Wireless quietly stopped selling the phones for several months rather than continue to replace and reprogram them. The problems affected a relatively small number of phones--possibly in the tens of thousands of units in California--but they nonetheless angered many PacBell Wireless customers and saddled Motorola with repair costs and lost sales.
SPORTS
September 13, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY
The executive committee of The Athletics Congress, the national governing body for track and field, voted Saturday to recommend a two-year contract extension for executive director Ollan Cassell. TAC President Frank Greenberg of Philadelphia said that he had been instructed by the executive committee not to reveal the results of the vote, which came after 2 1/2 hours of discussion during a meeting at Denver.
SPORTS
September 12, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ollan Cassell's status with The Athletics Congress will be the leading item on the agenda today in a meeting in Denver of the U.S. track and field governing body's executive committee. After hearing a report from a subcommittee formed earlier this year to evaluate Cassell, executive director for all 14 years of the organization's existence, the 22-member executive committee is expected to vote on whether to recommend to TAC's board of directors that his contract be renewed next March.
SPORTS
July 11, 1992 | Associated Press
Kamy Keshmiri, winner of the discus at the U.S. Olympic trials and the collegiate record-holder, said Friday he has been notified by The Athletics Congress that he tested positive for drugs at a random, out-of-competition test. TAC, the national governing body for track and field, said it would not have any comment on the matter. It is customary for TAC not to announce positive drug tests until an athlete has exhausted his appeals process. Keshmiri said from his Reno, Nev.
SPORTS
July 4, 1992 | JOHN ORTEGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marion Jones of Thousand Oaks High will defend her 100- and 200-meter titles in The Athletics Congress Junior (age 19 and under) track and field championships at Ohio State University, starting today. Jones finished fifth in the 100 and fourth in the 200 in the U.S. Olympic trials, which concluded Sunday. The semifinals and final of the 100 will be contested tonight and the semifinals and the final of the 200 will be held Sunday. The top two finishers in each event qualify for the U.S.
SPORTS
March 23, 1986 | Associated Press
Two-time world champion Craig Virgin and four-time American champion Pat Porter head a 21-member U.S. team that will compete today in the World Cross-Country Championships in Neuchatel, Switzerland, The Athletics Congress announced. Porter, of Alamosa, Colo., is considered the top U.S. entry and is one of the favorites to dislodge defending champion Carlos Lopes of Portugal, TAC said. The American men's, women's and junior men's teams were selected at trials in Waco, Texas, on Feb. 15.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | Mitch Polin
Cal State Los Angeles will be well represented at the second annual World Track and Field Championships that start Saturday in Rome. The Golden Eagles will have four former athletes competing. Three will represent the U.S.--sprinters Denean Howard and Diane Williams and long jumper Jennifer Inniss--and hurdler Sandra Farmer will run for Jamaica.
SPORTS
June 24, 1992 | JULIE CART
Shotputter Randy Barnes is a day closer to competing in the Olympic track and field trials Tuesday because The Athletics Congress took no court action to prevent the banned world record-holder from throwing on Friday. Barnes received a preliminary injunction from a state circuit court judge in West Virginia on Monday, giving him the right to compete in the shot--even though he is serving a two-year suspension for steroid use.
SPORTS
June 23, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The word trials has taken on a new meaning here at the the U.S. Olympic track and field trials, as yet another athlete--shotputter Randy Barnes--petitioned a court and won the right to compete. A Kanawha County, W.Va., Circuit Court judge ruled Monday that Barnes, who set the shotput world record at Los Angeles in 1990, be allowed to participate in the event, which is scheduled to begin Friday.
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