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Taco Truck

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2009 | Jeff Gottlieb
Sergio Merida and his relatives built taco trucks into a family business. To sell their fresh-cooked tacos, carnitas and tortas, each day they spread out across Palos Verdes Estates -- Merida to the east, his wife, Maggie Avila, to the center, and Sonia Avila, Maggie's mother, to the west. At lunchtime, Merida and Sonia Avila would pull alongside a small park and spend two hours feeding gardeners, construction workers and nannies, and the occasional local.
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NEWS
December 17, 2013 | by Jonathan Gold
Like so many people, I had grown to take King Taco for granted, as a stop on an Eastside taco tour that also included the tacos arabes at Elvirita's, the chicken neck tacos at Santa Rita, the carnitas tacos at Antojitos Denise's, and the crunchy shrimp tacos at Mariscos Jalisco. And after a while, as more and more tacos started to crowd onto the itinerary, I began to leave King Taco alone. King Taco may have been what jump-started the craze for tacos al pastor in Los Angeles, and its emergence in the late 1960s may have marked the point where the local taco culture began to move from the Mexican-American hard-shell taco toward the Central Mexican insistence on fresh tortillas, grilled meats and incendiary salsas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2009 | Ruben Vives
A tagging crew has robbed at least 22 taco truck vendors at gunpoint over the last three months along busy commercial streets in East L.A., sheriff's detectives said Thursday. The robberies have rattled the taco truck community, and officials said some vendors have been reluctant to report them for fear of retaliation from the tagging crew as well as problems with authorities. As a result, detectives believe there could be more unreported robberies. "They're easy targets," said Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013
Bill Porter Salesman with cerebral palsy was subject of TV Bill Porter, 81, a former door-to-door salesman with cerebral palsy who was portrayed by William H. Macy in an Emmy-winning TV movie, died Dec. 4 at a hospital in Gresham, Ore. The cause was an infection, Shelly Brady, a friend and longtime assistant, told KATU-TV. Determined to make his way through life independently despite his physical challenges, Porter spent decades trudging through Portland neighborhoods selling J.R. Watkins skin care creams and other products.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2009 | Phil Willon
A court commissioner has nixed a Los Angeles law that cracked down on how long taco trucks and other food coaches could stay open up for business. The ordinance, approved by the City Council in 2006, forced operators to stay on the go: Trucks were prohibited from parking in the same spot in a residential neighborhood for more than half an hour or in a commercial area for more than an hour. A similar law adopted by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors was tossed out by a judge last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON and MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They are the rugged individualists and scrappy entrepreneurs of the freewheeling catering industry. People who drive loncheras, better known as taco trucks, can be seen across the barrios of Los Angeles selling steaming hot tacos to Latino customers in worn work boots and the occasional burger to preppie Anglo college students. For many new immigrants from Mexico, buying a taco truck is a first strenuous step up the American ladder of success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Taco truck owners vowed to ignore a law passed by Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday making it a misdemeanor crime -- punishable by fines and jail -- to stay parked in one place for more than an hour. "They can try to move us, but we're not going to go," said Aleida De La Cruz, whose taco truck has been a family business for 20 years. "What are they going to do, take us all to jail?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
"Carne Asada Is Not a Crime," proclaims a website that has suddenly caught fire to rally food lovers across Los Angeles in defense of the iconic taco truck, now in the sights of a government crackdown. After county supervisors passed a law two weeks ago, threatening hefty fines or a year in jail against operators who linger too long in one place, a pair of former Occidental College roommates took it upon themselves to ignite a protest.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1989 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN
Every night, right down the street from my home, a pretty good taco truck parks and opens for business. I eat there often. After all, it's close, reasonable (75 cents a taco) and the food is fresh and wildly tasty. I can eat the tacos in the coziest of environments--my own home--and the service is direct, cheerful and non-problematic. The taco truck has also proved useful to me as a gauge to measure how I feel about a restaurant I'm reviewing. Sometimes, when I return home from a meal, I'm so satisfied and content that I don't even notice the truck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Business was brisk one recent night as the smell of sizzling carne asada floated from an East Los Angeles taco truck. A row of customers sat on folding chairs, tacos and quesadillas in hand. Two blocks down Cesar Chavez Avenue, Jesus Huerta's La Tia Tamale restaurant stood empty. "If they weren't there," Huerta said of the shiny chrome-sided Taqueria "El Pecas" truck, "I'd be selling right now."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Several years ago, a cookbook editor friend called asking my advice on whether she should publish Jacques Pépin's autobiography. Pepin is one of my heroes in food, I told her, but I'd pass on the book - all chef biographies tend to follow the same story arc, there's not a lot new to be said. Wisely she ignored me, and though "The Apprentice" turned out just as I predicted plot-wise, it was one of the bestselling cookbooks of the year. I learned two lessons from that incident: I'm a lot better off as a second-guessing journalist, and when it comes to these autobiographies, plot is secondary to character.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
The answer always comes with a puzzled look. "Flour? What's wrong with corn?" It's hard to explain to friends and the befuddled person behind the counter of a tortilleria or taco truck that nothing is wrong with the commonly found masa de maiz , but this Sonoran desert-born Mexican would love her carne asada resting on a small flour tortilla. I grew up in Nogales, Ariz., with family hours away on both sides of the border, and maize was an afterthought. Most kitchens had a rolling pin on the counter and a robin's egg-blue box (or sometimes, bucket)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Most restaurant owners shudder when a food truck pulls up outside. Not Mike Israyelyan. He invited one inside the Hollywood restaurant he calls Calle Tacos. Israyelyan and partners Robert Vinokur and Dorian and Javier Villaseñor spent $20,000 to have the side of a 22-foot-long food truck measured and an exact copy fabricated out of stainless steel. Then they equipped it with lights and tires, covered it with a colorful vinyl logo wrap and hauled it on a flatbed to Hollywood Boulevard.
FOOD
January 19, 2012
LOCATION: Check tacomaria.com and twitter.com/tacomaria for the latest locations and weekly schedule. PRICES: Tacos, $2.50 to $3; burritos, $6 to $7; specials and desserts, $4 to $7. DETAILS: Credit cards accepted.
FOOD
January 19, 2012 | By Miles Clements, Special to The Los Angeles Times
When food truck fatigue finally set in among the Twitter-equipped some time last year, the mobile movement all but stalled. Gone were the throngs that waited for hours, their attentions shifted instead to newly minted food artisans and itinerant pop-up restaurants. But in a Darwinian twist, only the strongest trucks have survived. And though the thrill of the chase may be gone for some, what remains are by and large the best meals on wheels. Taco María is a product of that natural selection.
FOOD
December 8, 2011
"Mission Street Food: Recipes and Ideas From an Improbable Restaurant" is as much a book with which to spend a few hours on the couch as it is a book that inspires your next meal. And it'd be an entertaining few hours. The book tells the story of Mission Street Food, the San Francisco culinary project of chef Anthony Myint, and his wife, Karen Leibowitz, who started selling their pork-belly-filled flatbreads from a subletted Guatemalan taco truck, and what took off from there. (Mission Street Food's successor is the restaurant Mission Chinese Food.)
OPINION
May 2, 2008
Call them what you will: roach coaches, loncheras, snack vans. But taco trucks are a rich part of our region's heritage -- as much so as, say, sidewalk sausage vendors in New York or crab stands at San Francisco's Fisherman's Wharf. Yet the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has another word for these mobile kitchens: nuisance. Two weeks ago, supervisors passed an ordinance that, starting May 15, will make it a misdemeanor to park a taco truck in one spot for more than an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2011 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
A machete-wielding man, who allegedly had hacked a diner outside a taco truck and later was shocked with a Taser by police officers to no effect, was shot by those same officers during a confrontation near downtown Los Angeles early Saturday, authorities said. The man, whose name police did not release, was in critical condition at a local hospital. The victim he allegedly had lacerated several times with a machete remained in serious condition. His name also was not released. The incident began shortly before 4 a.m. Police are still trying to understand why the armed man attacked the victim while he dined outside a taco truck on Beverly Boulevard, said Sgt. Mitzi Fierro of the Los Angeles Police Department.
NEWS
July 23, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Robert Rodriguez didn't intend to make a statement about immigration. It just worked out that way. When the controversy over the Arizona immigration law bubbled up several months ago, the director re-cut a version of the trailer for "Machete," his hybrid thriller/action/exploitation picture, to protest the law. "It's kind of funny because it's not really what the movie is about, and I didn't want people to think that it was," Rodriguez said...
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