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Tadpoles

NEWS
April 3, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Nearly three years after the California Museum of Science and Industry was forced to close its chick hatchery exhibit because of seismic damage to the building, the display has returned along with bullfrog tadpoles. The hatchery, which had been among the museum's educational exhibits since the 1950s, reopened last week as part of the Eggciting Beginnings exhibit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1994 | DEBBIE KONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unusually high number of mountain lion sightings in the city--including one this week--has forced the indefinite closure of the 150-acre trail area at the William R. Mason Regional Park for the first time in decades, officials said Friday. "To be on the safe side, we decided to shut it down," said Jerry F. Lahart, the supervising park ranger. Officials began posting new red and white warning signs around the park on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Schoolchildren on a nature walk in rural Minnesota were at first curious, then horrified, by what they found. A pond brimming with mutants: Baby frogs with too many legs, missing legs, crippled limbs, even missing eyes, as many freakish frogs as normal ones. Their discovery among the reeds and cattails of Le Sueur County in August 1995 was just the beginning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Federal biologists clad in waders and armed with long-handled nets this week moved hundreds of red-legged frog eggs from a San Fernando Valley stream to carefully selected wetlands 10 miles away in the first attempt to expand the threatened species' range in Southern California. Five hundred eggs transported from the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve to the Santa Monica Mountains are expected to hatch any day. When they do, they will reintroduce red-legged frog tadpoles to historic haunts that are free of predatory fish, snails and crayfish that could tear them apart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2002 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's largest population of red-legged frogs, a threatened species that has found itself in the middle of legal battles between environmentalists and homebuilders, may be living along a creek north of Santa Clarita, federal biologists said Monday. Scientists originally estimated that 50 of the 5-inch-long amphibians were living along San Francisquito Creek in the Angeles National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1985 | CATHERINE WILSON, Associated Press
Are you curious about the potential of hamsters to breed in the wild? Do you care about pocket gophers gnawing on electrical cables? Did you ever wonder about the value of acorns in the diet of steers? If so, you can find the answers in research reports from an experimental cattle range in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Central California.
SCIENCE
October 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
High in the mountains of northeastern Australia, scientists have discovered three intriguing animals that are brand new to science, and you can see all three of them in the photo gallery above. They include the bizarre-looking leaf-tailed gecko ( Saltuarius eximius ) with its giant eyes and broad leaf-shaped tail; the golden shade skink ( Saproscincus saltus ), which resembles a short snake with legs; and an elegant little frog ( Cophixalus petrophilus ) that spends most of its life in the cool moist cracks between the black granite boulders strewn across the top of the mountain range.
NEWS
November 20, 1990
Description: Brown overall, pale below, with short neck and big head. Black chin and throat contrast with white chicken-like bill with black ring. During winter the ringed bill and black throat disappear. Juveniles have striped brown neck. Length: 13-14 inches. Habitat: Wetlands, ponds, marshes and sluggish streams. Diet: Aquatic insects, brine, tadpoles and fish. Feather balls found in stomach.
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