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Tadzhikistan Government Officials

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NEWS
January 30, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gold-toothed Sangak Safarov has eight children and, at 65, is waiting for the birth of his ninth. He started late because he spent most of his adult life in prison. And he has, by his own estimate, 8,000 fighters at his command, perhaps the decisive force in the civil warfare afflicting the former Soviet republic of Tajikistan. Tajikistan has a government elected by its Parliament; it has an Interior Ministry and a Security Ministry and mayors.
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NEWS
January 30, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gold-toothed Sangak Safarov has eight children and, at 65, is waiting for the birth of his ninth. He started late because he spent most of his adult life in prison. And he has, by his own estimate, 8,000 fighters at his command, perhaps the decisive force in the civil warfare afflicting the former Soviet republic of Tajikistan. Tajikistan has a government elected by its Parliament; it has an Interior Ministry and a Security Ministry and mayors.
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NEWS
April 23, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A monthlong rally in the main square of Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan, formerly a Soviet republic, finally paid off Wednesday when the Speaker of the Communist-dominated Parliament bowed to demonstrators' demands and resigned. Opponents of the hard-line Parliament were so determined to get legislators' attention that they held 16 lawmakers and two political assistants hostage overnight.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | Reuters
Tajikistan's Parliament voted Friday to abandon the presidency and declared the war-torn Central Asian state a parliamentary republic, Russia's Itar-Tass news agency reported. Former Tajik President Rakhman Nabiyev, a former Communist, was swept from power by a coalition of Muslim radical and democrat forces in September. Fighting then flared into a virtual civil war, killing hundreds of people and leaving more than 100,000 homeless in the impoverished republic bordering Afghanistan and China.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | Reuters
Tajikistan President Rakhman Nabiyev, facing a simmering civil war in the south of his country, has been removed from power, a statement read on Tajik Radio said Wednesday. The statement, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., said the parliamentary leadership and the Cabinet had no confidence in Nabiyev, who was elected in November. Nabiyev's whereabouts have been unknown since armed militants on Monday occupied his residence in the capital, Dushanbe, and took ministers hostage.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's political turbulence spread into the heart of Muslim Central Asia on Saturday as the republics of Uzbekistan and Kirghizia declared independence and the president of neighboring Tadzhikistan was swept from office. The two Central Asian defections from the crumbling Soviet empire brought to 10 the number of republics that have formally sought to break away in an accelerated exodus brought on by the attempted coup two weeks ago by reactionary elements of the Kremlin.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In and around the Stalinesque city hall, plastered with posters denouncing Tadzhikistan's new ruler as "a Caesar who rode into Parliament on a donkey," the battle lines hardened Thursday in one of the Soviet Union's most desperate struggles between communism and democracy.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since glasnost liberated the millions of Muslims of Soviet Central Asia, Dushanbe's main mosques were empty Friday. And for the first time that anyone here could recall, the city's five Islamic priests canceled their sacred Friday prayers. It was the latest round in Soviet Central Asia's 70-year war between Islam and communism.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former President Rakhman Nabiyev said he was forced to resign at gunpoint and that Tajikistan is now under the influence of Islamic militants. Nabiyev spoke publicly for the first time since he resigned Monday and took refuge in his northern stronghold, the Leninabad region. He said he still hopes he can be restored to power. But he discounted suggestions that he could use Leninabad as a base for a campaign against the former Soviet republic's new leadership.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | Reuters
Tajikistan's Parliament voted Friday to abandon the presidency and declared the war-torn Central Asian state a parliamentary republic, Russia's Itar-Tass news agency reported. Former Tajik President Rakhman Nabiyev, a former Communist, was swept from power by a coalition of Muslim radical and democrat forces in September. Fighting then flared into a virtual civil war, killing hundreds of people and leaving more than 100,000 homeless in the impoverished republic bordering Afghanistan and China.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former President Rakhman Nabiyev said he was forced to resign at gunpoint and that Tajikistan is now under the influence of Islamic militants. Nabiyev spoke publicly for the first time since he resigned Monday and took refuge in his northern stronghold, the Leninabad region. He said he still hopes he can be restored to power. But he discounted suggestions that he could use Leninabad as a base for a campaign against the former Soviet republic's new leadership.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | Reuters
Tajikistan President Rakhman Nabiyev, facing a simmering civil war in the south of his country, has been removed from power, a statement read on Tajik Radio said Wednesday. The statement, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., said the parliamentary leadership and the Cabinet had no confidence in Nabiyev, who was elected in November. Nabiyev's whereabouts have been unknown since armed militants on Monday occupied his residence in the capital, Dushanbe, and took ministers hostage.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of anti-government demonstrators pitched tents in front of the president's office, vowing to stay until he fires former Communists in the government. They want President Rakhman Nabiyev to remove ex-Communist senior officials. They also called for multi-party elections and more religious freedom.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A monthlong rally in the main square of Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan, formerly a Soviet republic, finally paid off Wednesday when the Speaker of the Communist-dominated Parliament bowed to demonstrators' demands and resigned. Opponents of the hard-line Parliament were so determined to get legislators' attention that they held 16 lawmakers and two political assistants hostage overnight.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Communist regime that seized power in Tadzhikistan a week ago began to crumble Monday under the weight of a marathon street protest as the regime lifted a national state of emergency and agreed to consider suspending both the Communist Party and its hard-line leader. With tens of thousands of protesters shouting "Resign! Resign!" from their growing tent city just outside the Parliament building, President Rakhman Nabiyev, who led the coup, announced that he is ready to give up his post.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since glasnost liberated the millions of Muslims of Soviet Central Asia, Dushanbe's main mosques were empty Friday. And for the first time that anyone here could recall, the city's five Islamic priests canceled their sacred Friday prayers. It was the latest round in Soviet Central Asia's 70-year war between Islam and communism.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of anti-government demonstrators pitched tents in front of the president's office, vowing to stay until he fires former Communists in the government. They want President Rakhman Nabiyev to remove ex-Communist senior officials. They also called for multi-party elections and more religious freedom.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Communist regime that seized power in Tadzhikistan a week ago began to crumble Monday under the weight of a marathon street protest as the regime lifted a national state of emergency and agreed to consider suspending both the Communist Party and its hard-line leader. With tens of thousands of protesters shouting "Resign! Resign!" from their growing tent city just outside the Parliament building, President Rakhman Nabiyev, who led the coup, announced that he is ready to give up his post.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In and around the Stalinesque city hall, plastered with posters denouncing Tadzhikistan's new ruler as "a Caesar who rode into Parliament on a donkey," the battle lines hardened Thursday in one of the Soviet Union's most desperate struggles between communism and democracy.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's political turbulence spread into the heart of Muslim Central Asia on Saturday as the republics of Uzbekistan and Kirghizia declared independence and the president of neighboring Tadzhikistan was swept from office. The two Central Asian defections from the crumbling Soviet empire brought to 10 the number of republics that have formally sought to break away in an accelerated exodus brought on by the attempted coup two weeks ago by reactionary elements of the Kremlin.
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