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Tae Sam Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991
A Molotov cocktail was tossed Tuesday onto the roof of a South Los Angeles convenience store that is owned by a Korean-American who fatally shot a 42-year-old African-American during an alleged attempted robbery. The bottle, containing a flammable liquid, burned out and caused no damage or injuries, Los Angeles Police Lt. Eric A. Lillo said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the day after Korean-American merchants and black activists struck a deal to end a summer-long boycott of a South-Central Los Angeles grocery store, the key players made it clear that a lasting truce may be difficult to achieve and that the accord is, at best, a fragile one. The settlement negotiated by Mayor Tom Bradley's office suspended the 109-day boycott sparked by the June 4 shooting death of a black man by a Korean-American liquor store owner.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1991 | PENELOPE MCMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An organizer of demonstrations against a Korean-owned South-Central Los Angeles market Sunday condemned a weekend firebombing attack on the store, which has been a focus of community anger since the owner killed a black man there June 4. "We do not approve of violence and we are not condoning this at all," said the Rev. Edgar E. Boyd of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, which is across the street from Chung's Liquor Market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1991 | ANDREA FORD and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The involvement of the nonprofit Brotherhood Crusade in the boycott of a store in South-Central Los Angeles has drawn criticism from a county official who warns that the organization's leader may be increasing tension and divisiveness. Mimi Lopez Baffo, president of the county Commission on Human Relations, said the county "appears to be working against itself in supporting both the reduction of the tension and the Brotherhood Crusade."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1991 | ANDREA FORD and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The involvement of the nonprofit Brotherhood Crusade in the boycott of a store in South-Central Los Angeles has drawn criticism from a county official who warns that the organization's leader may be increasing tension and divisiveness. Mimi Lopez Baffo, president of the county Commission on Human Relations, said the county "appears to be working against itself in supporting both the reduction of the tension and the Brotherhood Crusade."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1991 | RICK HOLGUIN and JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A coalition of African-American religious and civic groups Monday called for a 90-day boycott of a South Los Angeles liquor store where the Korean-American owner fatally shot a black man during an apparent robbery. The June 4 incident was one of four shootings since March 16 involving African- and Korean-Americans in Los Angeles--incidents that have resulted in five deaths and have further strained relations between the two groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black community leaders refused to call off a boycott of a Korean-owned market in South-Central Los Angeles despite a meeting Friday with Mayor Tom Bradley and police officials, who told them the June 4 shooting of a black man in the store was justified. Bradley arranged the meeting in his office in an attempt to end the boycott, which has increased tensions between Korean merchants and African-American residents of the impoverished neighborhood.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last month, a 42-year-old African-American man named Lee Arthur Mitchell entered Chung's Liquor Market in South Los Angeles and attempted to purchase a wine cooler. The store owner's wife refused to trade a piece of jewelry for partial payment. According to police accounts, Mitchell then pretended to point a pistol and ordered the cash register emptied. Store owner Tae Sam Park produced a handgun, a struggle ensued and Mitchell was mortally wounded in the chest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinary effort to reduce tensions between Korean merchants and black residents of South-Central Los Angeles, Mayor Tom Bradley has arranged a meeting today between detectives who investigated a shooting at a Southside liquor store and organizers of a boycott of the business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the day after Korean-American merchants and black activists struck a deal to end a summer-long boycott of a South-Central Los Angeles grocery store, the key players made it clear that a lasting truce may be difficult to achieve and that the accord is, at best, a fragile one. The settlement negotiated by Mayor Tom Bradley's office suspended the 109-day boycott sparked by the June 4 shooting death of a black man by a Korean-American liquor store owner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black community leaders refused to call off a boycott of a Korean-owned market in South-Central Los Angeles despite a meeting Friday with Mayor Tom Bradley and police officials, who told them the June 4 shooting of a black man in the store was justified. Bradley arranged the meeting in his office in an attempt to end the boycott, which has increased tensions between Korean merchants and African-American residents of the impoverished neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinary effort to reduce tensions between Korean merchants and black residents of South-Central Los Angeles, Mayor Tom Bradley has arranged a meeting today between detectives who investigated a shooting at a Southside liquor store and organizers of a boycott of the business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1991 | PENELOPE MCMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An organizer of demonstrations against a Korean-owned South-Central Los Angeles market Sunday condemned a weekend firebombing attack on the store, which has been a focus of community anger since the owner killed a black man there June 4. "We do not approve of violence and we are not condoning this at all," said the Rev. Edgar E. Boyd of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, which is across the street from Chung's Liquor Market.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last month, a 42-year-old African-American man named Lee Arthur Mitchell entered Chung's Liquor Market in South Los Angeles and attempted to purchase a wine cooler. The store owner's wife refused to trade a piece of jewelry for partial payment. According to police accounts, Mitchell then pretended to point a pistol and ordered the cash register emptied. Store owner Tae Sam Park produced a handgun, a struggle ensued and Mitchell was mortally wounded in the chest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991
A Molotov cocktail was tossed Tuesday onto the roof of a South Los Angeles convenience store that is owned by a Korean-American who fatally shot a 42-year-old African-American during an alleged attempted robbery. The bottle, containing a flammable liquid, burned out and caused no damage or injuries, Los Angeles Police Lt. Eric A. Lillo said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1991 | RICK HOLGUIN and JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A coalition of African-American religious and civic groups Monday called for a 90-day boycott of a South Los Angeles liquor store where the Korean-American owner fatally shot a black man during an apparent robbery. The June 4 incident was one of four shootings since March 16 involving African- and Korean-Americans in Los Angeles--incidents that have resulted in five deaths and have further strained relations between the two groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1991
During a scuffle inside a South Los Angeles convenience store, a merchant shot and killed a neighborhood resident who allegedly tried to rob the business, police said Wednesday. Lee Arthur Mitchell, 42, was pronounced dead at the scene in the 7900 block of South Western Avenue. Tae Sam Park, 46, owner of Chung's Liquor, told police that Mitchell entered the store and was turned away after he tried to make a purchase without enough money to pay for the item, said Los Angeles Police Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1991
When the destinies of Tae Sam Park and Lee Arthur Mitchell crossed one day in South Los Angeles, little did they know that their encounter would result in yet another ugly confrontation between a Korean merchant and African Americans. First there was the shooting death of Mitchell and now a boycott against Park's store. To many African Americans, Mitchell's death was not only a tragedy but another insult leveled against them by Korean merchants, and a boycott is a logical response.
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