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Taft Hartley Act

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BUSINESS
October 1, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Bush administration moved cautiously Monday to intervene in the West Coast ports shutdown, few observers doubt that the president will act quickly to end the lockout if the two sides can't settle their differences within days. Most administration attention now focuses on the 1947 Taft-Hartley Act, which gives the president the power to call for an 80-day cooling-off period.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 13, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
The enactment of a so-called right-to-work law by the state of Michigan this week is indeed, as the media have described it, a blow against the union movement. Michigan, of all places. But it is also a blow against fairness and common sense. "Right to work" sounds like a law guaranteeing you a job, or at least protecting your job once you've got it. A lot of the propaganda by the Chamber of Commerce and similar business groups is about so-called forced unionism. In fact, the main effect of a right-to-work law is nearly the opposite.
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OPINION
December 15, 2005
Re "Labor's movement," Opinion, Dec. 11 The authors overlooked the role of the 1947 Taft-Hartley Act in the demise of unions, which, among other things, allowed the president to intervene in labor disputes deemed a threat to national security. President Bush invoked the act three years ago in the Pacific Maritime Assn.'s lockout of the West Coast longshoremen. It gave management a near-insurmountable edge during organizing campaigns, and it encouraged states to enact their own legislation banning the "union shop."
OPINION
December 15, 2005
Re "Labor's movement," Opinion, Dec. 11 The authors overlooked the role of the 1947 Taft-Hartley Act in the demise of unions, which, among other things, allowed the president to intervene in labor disputes deemed a threat to national security. President Bush invoked the act three years ago in the Pacific Maritime Assn.'s lockout of the West Coast longshoremen. It gave management a near-insurmountable edge during organizing campaigns, and it encouraged states to enact their own legislation banning the "union shop."
OPINION
August 18, 2003
Thank you for David Macaray's Aug. 13 commentary, "Let Unions Operate in a 'Free Market.' " Anyone with eyes to see and a mind to understand has seen the organized labor movement deteriorate within the last 30 years. Complex, top-heavy legislation has created a climate where, on a case-by-case basis, management -- galvanized by the notion that the American worker is too unsophisticated to decode its strategy -- is permitted to connect the dots to compromise contract agreements while union officials look the other way. Each case has weakened organized labor until unions have been reduced to pathetic, toothless "dinosaurs."
NEWS
October 30, 2003 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
With two ongoing strikes affecting mass transit and the city's major supermarkets, here's a look back at how some lesser-known strikes hit home in Hollywood. The Deepak Chopra Strike of 1989 Length of work stoppage: Three months Synopsis: Was the path to spiritual enlightenment connecting with your Dosha or developing a strong sense of Synchrodestiny? After months of negotiations in his head, Mr. Chopra declared an impasse on this question and briefly walked out on himself.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The campaign recently started by a major union against Bank of America just might serve as an intriguing example of how billions of dollars in workers' pension funds can be used as an alternative to strikes in many instances.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, NANCY CLEELAND and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush set the stage Monday to force the rapid reopening of West Coast ports after federally mediated contract talks between shipping lines and locked-out dockworkers broke off. The president created a three-member board of inquiry that will report to him today on whether there are grounds to seek a court order to reopen the ports under the rarely used Taft-Hartley Act.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a sharp setback for organized labor, a closely divided Supreme Court ruled Thursday that unions may not take disciplinary action against members for resigning and returning to work during a strike. The court, in a 5-4 decision, upheld a ruling by the National Labor Relations Board that prevented a union in the Midwest from imposing fines on members who had defected during a strike in 1977.
OPINION
December 13, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
The enactment of a so-called right-to-work law by the state of Michigan this week is indeed, as the media have described it, a blow against the union movement. Michigan, of all places. But it is also a blow against fairness and common sense. "Right to work" sounds like a law guaranteeing you a job, or at least protecting your job once you've got it. A lot of the propaganda by the Chamber of Commerce and similar business groups is about so-called forced unionism. In fact, the main effect of a right-to-work law is nearly the opposite.
NEWS
October 30, 2003 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
With two ongoing strikes affecting mass transit and the city's major supermarkets, here's a look back at how some lesser-known strikes hit home in Hollywood. The Deepak Chopra Strike of 1989 Length of work stoppage: Three months Synopsis: Was the path to spiritual enlightenment connecting with your Dosha or developing a strong sense of Synchrodestiny? After months of negotiations in his head, Mr. Chopra declared an impasse on this question and briefly walked out on himself.
OPINION
August 18, 2003
Thank you for David Macaray's Aug. 13 commentary, "Let Unions Operate in a 'Free Market.' " Anyone with eyes to see and a mind to understand has seen the organized labor movement deteriorate within the last 30 years. Complex, top-heavy legislation has created a climate where, on a case-by-case basis, management -- galvanized by the notion that the American worker is too unsophisticated to decode its strategy -- is permitted to connect the dots to compromise contract agreements while union officials look the other way. Each case has weakened organized labor until unions have been reduced to pathetic, toothless "dinosaurs."
NATIONAL
October 11, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When President Bush invoked a rarely used labor law to force the reopening of West Coast ports this week, he struck a double blow: one against what government lawyers argued was a threat to economic and national security, and a second against what pollsters said could be a threat to Republican political security.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2002 | MARLA DICKERSON, JOSEPH MENN and PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
West Coast ports are set to reopen tonight after a federal court Tuesday granted a temporary injunction ending the lockout that has bottled up ports from San Diego to Seattle, inflicting billions of dollars in damage on an already shaky economy. President Bush requested the emergency order Tuesday after a White House panel informed him that "seeds of distrust" had so poisoned relations between shipping lines and dockworkers that the two sides were unlikely to reach an agreement on their own.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, NANCY CLEELAND and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush set the stage Monday to force the rapid reopening of West Coast ports after federally mediated contract talks between shipping lines and locked-out dockworkers broke off. The president created a three-member board of inquiry that will report to him today on whether there are grounds to seek a court order to reopen the ports under the rarely used Taft-Hartley Act.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Bush administration moved cautiously Monday to intervene in the West Coast ports shutdown, few observers doubt that the president will act quickly to end the lockout if the two sides can't settle their differences within days. Most administration attention now focuses on the 1947 Taft-Hartley Act, which gives the president the power to call for an 80-day cooling-off period.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2002 | MARLA DICKERSON, JOSEPH MENN and PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
West Coast ports are set to reopen tonight after a federal court Tuesday granted a temporary injunction ending the lockout that has bottled up ports from San Diego to Seattle, inflicting billions of dollars in damage on an already shaky economy. President Bush requested the emergency order Tuesday after a White House panel informed him that "seeds of distrust" had so poisoned relations between shipping lines and dockworkers that the two sides were unlikely to reach an agreement on their own.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When President Bush invoked a rarely used labor law to force the reopening of West Coast ports this week, he struck a double blow: one against what government lawyers argued was a threat to economic and national security, and a second against what pollsters said could be a threat to Republican political security.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The campaign recently started by a major union against Bank of America just might serve as an intriguing example of how billions of dollars in workers' pension funds can be used as an alternative to strikes in many instances.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a sharp setback for organized labor, a closely divided Supreme Court ruled Thursday that unions may not take disciplinary action against members for resigning and returning to work during a strike. The court, in a 5-4 decision, upheld a ruling by the National Labor Relations Board that prevented a union in the Midwest from imposing fines on members who had defected during a strike in 1977.
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