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Taggers

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2010 | By Amina Khan
When taggers spray-painted the windows of Rosa Bobbio's tiny upholstery shop in Anaheim, she called the police, who told her it was the city's responsibility. But the city told her she owed it $466.66 in fines and fees for not replacing her defaced windows at Century Custom Upholstery. Bobbio's experience is similar to that of other business owners in Southern California who find themselves caught between the zero-tolerance policies of municipal governments and the persistent destruction of taggers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2009 | By Andrew Blankstein
For as long as many can remember, the section of the Los Angeles River that runs east of downtown has been an open-air gallery for taggers. No more. Members of the self-described "Metro Transit Assassins" used the river's sloping banks for massive tags of their acronym that stretched for blocks and could be seen from passing aircraft. "Buket," who gained notoriety for tagging the Hollywood Freeway overpass, put his black-bordered, mint-green moniker here at its biggest and boldest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
The flood channel near Interstate 10 has been scarred by hundreds of graffiti tags and, like a wound that never heals, treated countless times with drab paint. Beneath the layers of beige and gray are jagged markings that dominate San Bernardino Police Sgt. Dwight Waldo's world. He has tracked them for two decades - chasing taggers through back alleys, recovering hundreds of weapons from their hangouts and memorizing, then forgetting, more than 5,000 tags. What many in law enforcement once viewed as petty vandalism, mostly the work of teens with spray cans, early on became something more to Waldo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2011 | By Andrew Blankstein, Richard Winton and David Ng, Los Angeles Times
The Museum of Contemporary Art expected to make some waves when it launched "Art in the Streets," billed as the first major U.S. museum survey exhibition on graffiti and street art. But the LAPD said the show has also become a target of taggers who want to leave a mark of their own outside the Little Tokyo exhibition space where the show opened Sunday. In a city considered one of the birthplaces of street art, the exhibit at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA has intensified an already fierce debate about whether something that is illegal can also have artistic value.
OPINION
February 2, 2009
Re "7 alleged L.A. taggers arrested," Jan. 29 At a time of very tight funding, it seems truly criminal to have to pay to clean up the work of taggers. There is another solution that is very simple and will not cost much at all. Hopefully some judge will give these people some wire brushes and tell them to go to work. Their sentence would be served when the unsolicited painting is cleaned up. A guard or two might have to be paid, but that, in the case of the Metro Transit Assassins, would be a lot cheaper than the almost $4-million cleanup cost cited by the Army Corps of Engineers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994
I couldn't believe it when I read that the city of Oxnard would require its homeowners to keep graffiti off their property or be penalized. The so-called deterrent of going after the taggers who have driver's licenses nearly made me laugh. It is obvious the city has just given up trying to capture taggers and recouping monies from them to restore vandalized property. If appearances count for anything, it looks like we need some real leaders to emerge. The ones at the city don't seem to be in control of the situation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994
I couldn't believe it when I read that the city of Oxnard would require its homeowners to keep graffiti off their property or be penalized. The so-called deterrent of going after the taggers who have drivers' licenses nearly made me laugh. It is obvious the city has just given up trying to capture taggers and recouping monies from them to restore vandalized property. If appearances count for anything, it looks like we need some real leaders to emerge. The ones at City Hall don't seem to be in control of the situation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
You've done it again! You've tagged graffiti vandals as "graffiti artists" ("Tackling the 'Taggers,' " Dec. 18). The Times consistently gives these people the publicity (and validation) they crave by making their "artistic efforts" the stuff of news stories. Whether they're gang members marking their turf or taggers publicizing themselves, they create a blight on the environment. Reading about themselves in the paper must be gratifying, don't you think? CAROL THOMPSON, Anaheim Hills
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