Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTaggers
IN THE NEWS

Taggers

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2009 | Richard Winton
A tagger whom Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa once offered to mentor after he was photographed scrawling graffiti on a bus was arrested again Thursday for allegedly tagging a tunnel and another bus, authorities said. The 17-year-old boy known as Zoner was arrested at 1:20 p.m. after surrendering to sheriff's detectives, who earlier in the day served a search warrant at his home. The teenager was booked on suspicion of felony vandalism. Sheriff's investigators allege that he scrawled his street name on a Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus and other property.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Ruben Vives
A Cudahy councilman and his brother escaped serious injury and perhaps worse Monday night when a gunman sprayed their sport utility vehicle with bullets in an apparent ambush, authorities said. The shooting occurred at Atlantic Boulevard and Slauson Avenue in Maywood, as Councilman Osvaldo Conde, 48, and his brother, Erik Conde, 28, pursued a car carrying a group of taggers who had just vandalized Osvaldo Conde's business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
Daredevil tagger "Buket," who gained notoriety for his brazen daylight "bomb" of a sign over the Hollywood Freeway, could be headed to state prison after authorities Thursday said they had found fresh evidence of his tags in downtown and South Los Angeles. Los Angeles County sheriff's transit investigators did a probation compliance search Thursday at the home of graffiti artist Cyrus Yazdani after they found new "Buket" tags on a mural on the Hollywood Freeway, a South L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Half his lifetime later, Daniel Ramos claims no aesthetic laurels for the teenage graffiti-writing rampage that made him famous as "Chaka," the most prolific tagger L.A. authorities ever had seen or caught. "I wasn't doing anything artistic. It was just getting my name up there," says the man police and prosecutors accused in 1990 of spraying more than 10,000 "Chakas" from San Diego to San Francisco. He is going over his past in a soft voice, his small but solid frame seated on a plastic milk crate in the dusty back courtyard of Mid-City Arts, the Los Angeles street-art supply shop and gallery that today mounts "Resurrection," the first art show of his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2009 | David Zahniser
Two Los Angeles politicians said Tuesday that they would embark on a new strategy for fighting graffiti: taking the vandals, and their parents, to civil court and demanding financial damages. City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo and Councilman Dennis Zine said they would pursue passage of an ordinance that would allow private property owners to turn responsibility for graffiti cleanup over to the city. That, in turn, would allow city prosecutors to sue for damages if the property was vandalized.
OPINION
February 2, 2009
Re "7 alleged L.A. taggers arrested," Jan. 29 At a time of very tight funding, it seems truly criminal to have to pay to clean up the work of taggers. There is another solution that is very simple and will not cost much at all. Hopefully some judge will give these people some wire brushes and tell them to go to work. Their sentence would be served when the unsolicited painting is cleaned up. A guard or two might have to be paid, but that, in the case of the Metro Transit Assassins, would be a lot cheaper than the almost $4-million cleanup cost cited by the Army Corps of Engineers.
OPINION
February 2, 2009
Re "7 alleged L.A. taggers arrested," Jan. 29 Even though graffiti is a major blight on our city, we should not overlook that the embankment tag shown in The Times photo is miles apart from the usual crude scrawls with which gangsters threaten and boast. The tag in the picture is skillfully executed and features a use of shading that is striking. The reason "Smear" has enjoyed some success in the art world is clear: He's quite good. I for one can't agree that the embankment would look any better if the tag were whitewashed, nor that anyone should be fined for the cost of doing so. James van Scoyoc Los Angeles :: Sadly, this article succeeded in glorifying the efforts of gangs and vandals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2009 | Richard Winton
In the macho, braggart, narcissistic world of Los Angeles tagging, no one can match the Metro Transit Assassins crew. Authorities said the group is responsible for some of the city's most notorious acts of vandalism, most notably L.A.'s largest tag: the giant, half-mile-long "MTA" scrawl that appeared last year along the concrete banks of the Los Angeles River near downtown.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|