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June 3, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This little island yearns for international recognition. It's desperate for membership in world bodies such as the United Nations. Its people want to be seen as players in their own right, not just as a rich appendage of the Chinese mainland. Its government coddles the few diplomatic allies it has left, mostly impoverished countries that receive hefty financial aid in return for not moving their embassies to Beijing.
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NEWS
June 3, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This little island yearns for international recognition. It's desperate for membership in world bodies such as the United Nations. Its people want to be seen as players in their own right, not just as a rich appendage of the Chinese mainland. Its government coddles the few diplomatic allies it has left, mostly impoverished countries that receive hefty financial aid in return for not moving their embassies to Beijing.
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NEWS
November 10, 1996 | From Associated Press
Stung by allegations that it uses money to win diplomatic backing, Taiwan said Saturday that it will no longer employ its wealth to fight China's diplomatic blockade. The announcement by Foreign Minister John Chang followed allegations that the Taiwanese governing party's top money man offered to contribute $15 million to President Clinton's reelection campaign at a time when Taiwan was raising its diplomatic profile over furious objections from rival China.
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | From Associated Press
Stung by allegations that it uses money to win diplomatic backing, Taiwan said Saturday that it will no longer employ its wealth to fight China's diplomatic blockade. The announcement by Foreign Minister John Chang followed allegations that the Taiwanese governing party's top money man offered to contribute $15 million to President Clinton's reelection campaign at a time when Taiwan was raising its diplomatic profile over furious objections from rival China.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against the backdrop of an increasingly dangerous test of wills between China and Taiwan, leading Senate Republicans faced off with the Clinton administration Wednesday over legislation to require stepped-up U.S. defense assistance to Taiwan. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), the primary author of the bill, said it is time to build up Taiwan's military capacity to resist Beijing's "bullying." He accused President Clinton of yielding to pressure from China.
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