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Taizo Watanabe

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May 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
Japan may react strongly if the U.S. government lists it among countries deemed to seriously violate free trade principles, a Foreign Ministry official said today. Under U.S. trade law, the Bush Administration must decide by May 30 which countries maintain high trade barriers to U.S. products. Japan topped a preliminary list, released last month by U.S. Trade Representative Carla Hills, of 34 countries deemed to have such barriers. "This is a matter that has already created quite a reaction in this country," Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe told a regular press briefing.
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BUSINESS
February 11, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of Pearl Harbor Day last December, in front of 700 people decked out in their holiday finest, Los Angeles Music Center President Esther Wachtell toasted two men at a dinner in the Biltmore Hotel ballroom. One was a Japanese diplomat who saw his despondent brother commit suicide in the aftermath of the World War II defeat. The other was a retired American executive whose ship was torpedoed by the Germans and whose brother was wounded by the Japanese.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | Teresa Watanabe, Times staff writer
Until Japan recently pledged $9 billion in aid to the U.S.-led multinational coalition in the Persian Gulf, it had come under increasing fire by some Americans for not doing its fair share. To critics, Japan moved too slowly in announcing that it would join the economic embargo against Iraq. Then Japanese legislation to allow the dispatch of noncombat troops to the Gulf failed in a hail of national protest. And although Japan boasts foreign reserves of $76.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | Teresa Watanabe, Times staff writer
Until Japan recently pledged $9 billion in aid to the U.S.-led multinational coalition in the Persian Gulf, it had come under increasing fire by some Americans for not doing its fair share. To critics, Japan moved too slowly in announcing that it would join the economic embargo against Iraq. Then Japanese legislation to allow the dispatch of noncombat troops to the Gulf failed in a hail of national protest. And although Japan boasts foreign reserves of $76.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of Pearl Harbor Day last December, in front of 700 people decked out in their holiday finest, Los Angeles Music Center President Esther Wachtell toasted two men at a dinner in the Biltmore Hotel ballroom. One was a Japanese diplomat who saw his despondent brother commit suicide in the aftermath of the World War II defeat. The other was a retired American executive whose ship was torpedoed by the Germans and whose brother was wounded by the Japanese.
NEWS
March 10, 1989
Japan denied U.S. reports that a Japanese firm in line to make a new version of the F-16 fighter jet was involved in construction of what Washington says is a Libyan chemical weapons plant. "We found . . . no evidence that Japanese companies have been involved in this project," Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe said. "(And) I can now confirm that Mitsubishi Heavy Industries has never been engaged in the export of equipment or dispatch of engineers." Mitsubishi also denied the reports.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Japan sent 491 Chinese nationals, some in tears, back to China by boat today in the largest deportation of Chinese refugees who streamed into Japan during last year's political unrest in China. "Our understanding is they came here for economic related purposes," said Taizo Watanabe, the Foreign Ministry's chief spokesman. "They had been living in China and were not under political suppression."
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | Reuters
Japan on Friday denied a report that Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu has offered Iraq $5 billion to persuade it to withdraw from Kuwait. Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe dismissed the report in the Spectator, a British weekly magazine. "It's another ugly example of the preconceived idea about what Japan is like and a kind of bias against the position of the Japanese government," said Watanabe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1988
Consul General Hiromoto Seki is the new head of the Japanese consular district for Southern California, Arizona and New Mexico, officials announced. Seki replaces former Consul General Taizo Watanabe, who is now deputy chief of mission at the Japanese Embassy in Washington. Seki's arrival at the Japanese Consulate in Los Angeles marks his second American posting. He also served at the Japanese Consulate in New York from 1961 through 1964.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
Japan may react strongly if the U.S. government lists it among countries deemed to seriously violate free trade principles, a Foreign Ministry official said today. Under U.S. trade law, the Bush Administration must decide by May 30 which countries maintain high trade barriers to U.S. products. Japan topped a preliminary list, released last month by U.S. Trade Representative Carla Hills, of 34 countries deemed to have such barriers. "This is a matter that has already created quite a reaction in this country," Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe told a regular press briefing.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1989 | From Times wire services
Japan's oil imports from Iran will decline this spring, but that may reflect lower seasonal demand rather than a reaction to the controversy over Iran's death threat against Salman Rushdie, author of "The Satanic Verses," a senior official said today. Taizo Watanabe, the chief spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, said Japan will take "a back position" in condemning the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's death threat against Rushdie.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From The Washington Post
The Japanese government has announced it will begin repatriating Chinese "boat people" and said the first 301 will be sent back today. Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe said the 301 are among 1,668 Chinese who illegally entered Japan this year by posing as Vietnamese "boat people." Most came seeking employment in prosperous Japan and cannot be considered genuine political refugees, Japanese officials said.
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