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Taken Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009 | Michael Ordona
The brawls in the Liam Neeson actioner "Taken" are downright Hobbesian: nasty, brutish and short. "In real life, fights are very short," said fight choreographer Olivier Schneider. "What I wanted was not to show something beautiful but something realistic and very powerful. You don't have time to pose." Neeson's character, a former spy, employs a mix of Chinese and Indonesian martial arts in an ultra-aggressive, no-nonsense approach to conflict resolution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If you're an agent who represents the hottest new director in Hollywood, it's never quiet in your office because your phone never stops ringing. Just ask Robert Newman, the veteran Endeavor agent who represents a host of top directors, including "Slumdog Millionaire's" Danny Boyle. With Boyle poised to collect an Oscar statuette or two Sunday, you'd think Newman would be basking in the Boyle spotlight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If you're an agent who represents the hottest new director in Hollywood, it's never quiet in your office because your phone never stops ringing. Just ask Robert Newman, the veteran Endeavor agent who represents a host of top directors, including "Slumdog Millionaire's" Danny Boyle. With Boyle poised to collect an Oscar statuette or two Sunday, you'd think Newman would be basking in the Boyle spotlight.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009 | Michael Ordona
The brawls in the Liam Neeson actioner "Taken" are downright Hobbesian: nasty, brutish and short. "In real life, fights are very short," said fight choreographer Olivier Schneider. "What I wanted was not to show something beautiful but something realistic and very powerful. You don't have time to pose." Neeson's character, a former spy, employs a mix of Chinese and Indonesian martial arts in an ultra-aggressive, no-nonsense approach to conflict resolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1996 | FRANK MALFITANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood, in its brilliant state of creativity, is on a wave of producing vast numbers of big-screen versions of popular TV series. Much to critics' dismay (and filmgoers' delight) everything from "The Addams Family" to "The Brady Bunch" has invaded multiplexes in new incarnations, while the likes of "Sgt. Bilko" and "Mission: Impossible" are waiting in the wings.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
On the fourth floor of a vacant wing of St. Vincent Medical Center near downtown Los Angeles, some 150 crew members crowded the hallways, joining actors Chris Evans and Scarlett Johansson as they prepared to film a scene for "Captain America: The Winter Soldier. " The hospital wing is often used for filming television crime dramas such as "CSI" and "Private Practice," but Tuesday's shoot was among the largest St. Vincent has accommodated in 20 years of renting out its facilities to Hollywood.
OPINION
January 28, 2014
Re "Homeboy Industries is a struggling success story," Column, Jan. 26 While Steve Lopez was interviewing the inimitable Father Gregory Boyle last Wednesday, two of his Homeboy Industries success stories were guiding 50 kids from Venice High School's POPS club around the premises, telling us the stories of their rebuilt lives. In two hours, our students - whose lives are touched by prison, with a parent or another loved one inside - were changed forever. The moment we stepped off the bus and the kids recognized rival gang members and saw them shaking hands, working side by side, their eyes, ears and hearts expanded.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999 | ED MORALES, Ed Morales is a staff writer at the Village Voice and is writing a book about Latino identity in the United States for St. Martin's Press
Sitting in front of a mirror in the greenroom at MTV's Times Square studios, amid a swirl of makeup artists, publicists, wardrobe consultants, her manager, personal assistant and various other handlers, Jennifer Lopez is grooving on her first big moment as a pop star. Having just premiered the first video from her debut album, "On the 6," she is planning a live appearance on David Letterman's show the following week. "Are we getting Sheila E. for the band?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1988 | JOHN A. OSWALD, Times Staff Writer
A city task force studying ways to stem the tide of "runaway" film and television production is recommending creation of a film commission to sell Los Angeles as an ideal location for shooting movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One bright morning in 1938, a young Italian newspaper reporter, a shy and gawkish lad who might have had a pimple on his nose, caught a blue tram from downtown Rome and rode it to a new world. Cinecitta, the Italian government's cinema studio-city, is just one more subway stop today, but it lay deep in the countryside then.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1996 | FRANK MALFITANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood, in its brilliant state of creativity, is on a wave of producing vast numbers of big-screen versions of popular TV series. Much to critics' dismay (and filmgoers' delight) everything from "The Addams Family" to "The Brady Bunch" has invaded multiplexes in new incarnations, while the likes of "Sgt. Bilko" and "Mission: Impossible" are waiting in the wings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Jimmy HAYWARD wanted to direct movies for as long as he can remember, and when he started working at Pixar Animation Studios more than a decade ago, it looked like the self-taught animator was well on his way. He collected animation credits on "Toy Story" and its sequel, and on "A Bug's Life," "Monsters, Inc." and "Finding Nemo." But Hayward eventually realized that if his childhood dream was to come true, he would have to do what very few Pixar employees ever consider: leave the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1986 | Richard Buffum
Several years ago at a party, Prof. Tony Delap, an amateur magician who is a professional sculptor and member of UC Irvine's fine arts faculty, momentarily astonished patrons by levitating a woman outside Newport Harbor Art Museum. In the darkness, with a spotlight trained upon the "floating" woman, the wires extending down from an overhead crane were not visible. But seconds later, party-goers could glimpse the glitter of metal--exposing Delap's secret.
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