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Talent Agent

BUSINESS
November 24, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER and SALLIE HOFMEISTER
When Nancy Josephson first gave up her entertainment-law career to join International Creative Management's New York office as a television agent, her colleagues would speak in hushed tones when they saw her in the halls. "Oh, she's the daughter," they'd whisper. Or, if she happened to pass by an office and hear an agent cursing at someone, the door would suddenly shut as if she might report it to her father, Marvin Josephson, the owner of the agency.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1993 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge on Wednesday sentenced a former Burbank talent agent to five years and four months in prison for sexually assaulting nine aspiring actresses and a female Glendale police officer who posed as one to investigate him. A Pasadena Superior Court jury convicted Wallace Kaye, 52, on April 28 of 10 counts, ranging from felony sexual battery by restraint to felony imprisonment by violence to misdemeanor battery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Burbank talent agent was arrested Wednesday on charges he sexually assaulted five actresses or models during interviews in his office and then molested an undercover female police officer sent to investigate, police said. Wallace Kaye, 52, was being held at Burbank police headquarters in lieu of $50,000 bail on suspicion of four counts of sexual battery and two counts of false imprisonment, said Burbank Police Detective David Gabriel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tim Shumaker has a sinking feeling that he's reached the end of the line with the new Los Angeles subway. That's because there seems to be no end to the nearly six years of misery that Hollywood's only blind talent agent has suffered since tunneling for the Red Line destroyed his business and left him homeless. Shumaker's world collapsed in 1994 when subway construction beneath Hollywood Boulevard caused the building where he lived and worked to abruptly drop 9 inches. Police gave Shumaker and his business partner-wife, Maggie, five minutes to grab what they could.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Hans Riegel, 90, a marketing executive who made German candy maker Haribo and its signature gummi bears a chewy hit across the globe, died Tuesday of heart failure in Bonn, the company announced. He had been recovering from an operation to remove a benign brain tumor. Riegel was the son of the company founder, also named Hans Riegel, who in 1920 set up Haribo - an acronym for "Hans Riegel Bonn. " In 1922, his father invented the "dancing bear," a small bear made out of fruit gum that laid the foundations for Haribo's later success with the "gold bear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2010 | Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Martin Baum, an old-time New York theatrical talent agent who became a veteran voice of experience for the upstart Creative Artists Agency in the late 1970s and who brought to the firm such established star clients as Sidney Poitier and Peter Sellers, has died. He was 86. Baum died Friday at his home in Beverly Hills, the agency announced. The cause was not given. "To those of us in his CAA family, Marty was a hero," the agency's partners said in a statement. "He was not only a brilliant agent, but a generous mentor to so many.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity the poor Hollywood agent. In the '80s and early '90s, talent agents ruled the industry. Movie studios and television networks found themselves beholden to International Creative Management, the Creative Artists Agency and the time-tested William Morris Agency, the "big three" agencies that had a lock on most A-list stars. Agents made big money for both their clients and themselves, charging the TV networks, for example, huge so-called packaging fees to assemble talent for shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By David Ng
The recent Los Angeles run of "I'll Eat You Last," starring Bette Midler as the late talent agent Sue Mengers, drew a fair number of Hollywood stars to the Geffen Playhouse -- some of whom actually knew Mengers during her heyday in the '70s as a Tinseltown power broker. Among the most notable faces in the Geffen audience was Barbra Streisand, who was one of Mengers' most important clients and is a key point of reference in the play. Streisand attended a recent performance of "I'll Eat You Last" with her husband, James Brolin, according to the actress-singer's publicist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Time waits for no man. And Hollywood's patience is even shorter. Studios will hurry movies into production to make a release date. Producers will recast lead roles in a heartbeat if an actor is unavailable for a moment. And don't even think about putting a talent agent on hold — they won't be on the line five seconds later. So when filmmaker John Luessenhop told Screen Gems five years ago that his 4-year-old son was gravely ill and that he needed to drop everything to care for him, Luessenhop could reasonably assume that the studio would find a new director for "Takers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Michael S. Rosenfeld, a talent agent and producer who was one of the founding partners of Creative Artists Agency, has died. He was 75. Rosenfeld died Thursday of respiratory failure at Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center after a long illness, the agency announced. "He enjoyed an exemplary career as a talent agent," the agency said in a statement. "He played an important role in the growth and success of CAA, and prided himself on starting the agency's literary department." In 1975, Rosenfeld and four other successful middle-management executives with the William Morris Agency left to form Creative Artists Agency, which would become a talent agency powerhouse.
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