Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTalent Scouts
IN THE NEWS

Talent Scouts

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1989
A Hollywood talent scout was sentenced Friday to 16 years in state prison for sexually assaulting two women he lured to his office through newspaper ads seeking models. Superior Court Judge Ernest Hiroshige imposed the sentence on Ross Washington, 56, after he pleaded guilty Feb. 21 to one count each of rape and rape with a foreign object. Deputy Dist. Atty. Steve Sitkoff said the assaults in Washington's Sunset Boulevard office occurred in 1987 and 1988.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
September 26, 2011 | By Gary Klein
Former USC assistant Willie Mack Garza allegedly wired $1,500 to a former talent scout to reimburse him for a prospect's unofficial recruiting trip when Garza was an assistant on Lane Kiffin's coaching staff at Tennessee, an apparent violation of NCAA rules, according to a report posted Monday night by Yahoo Sports. Garza resigned at USC a few days before the season opener, saying in a statement, because of "some personal issues unrelated to USC that I need to address. " The report said that Garza reimbursed Will Lyles for the trip taken by Lache Seastrunk, a running back from Texas, and the player's mother.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
Tom Ferguson had ignored Eddie Stanky's advice--"Kid, never let 'em get you out of the majors, even if you have to be an usher." So now, 57 and far from the bright lights of the big leagues, Fergie was speeding south through the late-afternoon dusk in pursuit of someone else's dream, his miniature poodle and constant companion Albert asleep on the back seat. He reached for a cigar, had second thoughts, and stuck a piece of gum in his mouth instead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Mary Murphy, a film and television actress best remembered for playing the wholesome small-town girl opposite Marlon Brando's rebellious motorcycle gang leader in "The Wild One," has died. She was 80. Murphy died of heart disease May 4 at her home in Beverly Hills, said her daughter, Stephanie Specht. In "The Wild One," the 1953 film about two rival biker gangs that menace the citizens of a tiny California town, Murphy played Kathie, the daughter of the ineffectual local cop, who captures the attention of Brando's tough guy, Johnny.
SPORTS
August 13, 1985 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
When Bill Walsh joined the San Francisco 49ers as their head coach in 1979, the second player he drafted was quarterback Joe Montana of Notre Dame. That surprised many of the others who coach and scout in the National Football League. Montana can't throw the long ball, they said truthfully. So they had passed on him in the first round, and again in the second, leaving Walsh to pick him in the third.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Moir, a long-haired former talent scout who works out of an office in an Encino strip mall, is getting under the skin of the record industry's top executives. Artists have long been suspicious of the companies they work for, hiring personal managers to duke it with music executives over money and creative control. Moir has discovered that many of the mid- and low-level executives mistrust their corporate bosses as much as musicians do those middle executives.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Interviews don't come easy to Michael Ovitz. Even in his private sanctum, flanked by a pair of colleagues, safe beneath the dual gaze of Buddha and Marilyn Monroe--totemic bits of art on a movie maker's wall--the sandy-haired president of Creative Artists Agency is wary and tense and never stops wishing the limelight would go away. "This is not a comfortable experience for any of us," he says, his hoarse voice so low a reporter's recorder barely registers. "We really function behind the scenes.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | ROBERT WYNNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At 22, Kristen Trucksess was flying high. The young actress had just arrived from New Jersey and within weeks landed her first role on television. At 30, she has fallen back to earth. The roles have become fewer and farther between. "I feel frustrated because I was the young newcomer, the 22-year-old blonde," says Trucksess, who waits tables at a Santa Monica restaurant. "Now, it's harder."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday night's semifinal round of the Texas Tuneup band battle at Bogart's shouldn't be confused with Armageddon, but it did prove, at least to your humble scribe, that the last shall indeed be first. In the estimation of a six-judge panel, the best of the evening's five unsigned, Orange County-based competitors was Trip the Spring. The victorious Fullerton band will now carry its palette of atypical late-'60s British folk and progressive rock influences into the Tuneup finals Wednesday night.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. is not The Place for beauty queens these days. Heads don't always turn when they walk by, agents don't necessarily return their calls, no one is dying to turn them into movie stars or TV talk-show hostesses. Miss USA can't even get a guest shot on her favorite talk show. "Arsenio, are you listening?" asks Gretchen Polhemus as she coils her sinuous, six-foot body toward a reporter's tape recorder, in the hope that her plea will reach Arsenio Hall. But it probably won't--and she knows it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Gina Piccalo
One in a series of occasional articles about how alternative comedy is fueling Hollywood. When asked what makes them laugh, comedy scouts will all give some version of the same answer: authenticity. The slick, one-two, punch-line act ripped from the day's headlines that might woo the two-drink minimum crowds in Cincinnati probably won't land you a spot on "The Office" or earn you a stand-up set at the prestigious Just for Laughs Festival in Montreal. But hop up on stage in a wife-beater shirt, hair parted down the middle, as comedian Jon Daly does, and spend seven minutes riffing in a thick Brooklyn accent on the phrase "Come on now," until your audience starts wondering whether you've lost your mind -- then, you just might get somewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Shelby Singleton, a maverick country music mogul and talent scout who launched the careers of Roger Miller and Ray Stevens before resuscitating the fabled Sun Records label to give new life to recordings by 1950s Sun discoveries including Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis, has died. He was 77. Singleton died Wednesday in Nashville following a battle with brain cancer. He had been admitted to St. Thomas Hospital a week earlier after suffering a seizure, his longtime friend and associate Jerry Kennedy said Thursday.
SPORTS
January 14, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
The 15-year-old was as thin as a bat and about as smooth as sandpaper. But the scout saw something special in his hands, in his arms. So he carved an infield into a corner of the cow pasture outside his front door and hit the boy 300 grounders a day through the spring rainstorms and the oppressive summer heat.
SPORTS
May 9, 2005 | Greg Abel, Special to The Times
For NBA scouts, general managers, coaches and agents, a few events every year qualify as unofficial conventions, when those in the business convene to evaluate players, talk deals and swap stories. This weekend, the EuroLeague final four here became just such a "must-attend" event, confirming the increasing respect and attention paid to European basketball. "It's about talent," Clipper Coach Mike Dunleavy said. "We're here to see players."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
On clear weekends here, a boisterous bazaar sets up along the sidewalks that bracket Broadway and Canal Street, and anyone in the market for a gold chain, a bootleg DVD or a Rolex of questionable pedigree can haggle up and down the block. One of the fixtures on this scene is a salesman -- he identifies himself only as "J" (it's even on his business card) -- who stacks underground rap CDs on a folding table, most priced at $10.
SPORTS
March 17, 2002 | Mark Heisler
In a salute to the NCAA tournament, here's my annual mock draft of every amateur (European/salaried, NCAA/pure or whatever) in the world. Personally, I'm with Billy Packer. None of the young guys are ready. No one was ready when everyone stayed in school the whole four years, so the youth thing is a mixed blessing for the NBA, not to mention a disaster for Packer's NCAA. Unfortunately, it's not up to us but the youths, who routinely choose millions over an education. Go figure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1998 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting at an outdoor table on the Santa Monica promenade, whistle-blower Rick Espinoza Jr. calls over the young waitress, just to illustrate his point. "Have you ever modeled before?" he asks. The woman's face brightens like a Klieg light. "Oh, I've always wanted to," she gushes. "But I guess I'm too short, at least that's what my mom tells me. But I'm taking acting classes. Anything is better than waitressing."
SPORTS
October 6, 1990
The Dodgers named Terry Reynolds, 37, as director of scouting. Reynolds had been the team's assistant director of scouting under Ben Wade, who retired.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a sunny Sunday afternoon poolside at a downtown Los Angeles hotel, and a few dozen Hollywood hipsters--lured into the daylight by the presence of several top area DJs--are tanning to the sounds of cool tunes. Getting ready for her stint at the turntables, a petite, dreadlocked woman in her early 30s picks through a box of vinyl records, selecting items ranging from Parisian accordion to party-minded old-school hip-hop, with a heavy emphasis on good-vibe reggae dub.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2000
Another hearing was set Tuesday for the man suspected of posing as a talent scout to lure 14 UCLA students to his apartment and secretly videotaping his sexual assaults on them. Michael Peers, 50, is due back in court April 4. He remains jailed, with bond set at $38,500. Prosecutors and defenders said they are still reviewing evidence, but expect the trial to begin April 14. The UCLA women allegedly were lured to an apartment in 1998 with promises of jobs in the entertainment industry.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|