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Tamoxifen

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BUSINESS
September 24, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Barr Laboratories Inc. must delay introducing its version of AstraZeneca's tamoxifen cancer drug, the Food and Drug Administration said. The maker of generic drugs said it would sue the agency. Barr sells tamoxifen through an agreement with AstraZeneca and had hoped to introduce its formula Aug. 20. The FDA ruling would postpone that to February.
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SCIENCE
September 23, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Women with a higher-than-usual risk for developing breast cancer should consider taking one of two medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration to reduce that risk, a federal panel has concluded. But the medications, which can raise a woman's risk of developing blood clots, are not for everyone and should not be taken for breast cancer reduction by most women, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said. Taken daily by women who are more likely than most to develop breast cancer, the chemotherapy drug tamoxifen or the osteoporosis drug raloxifene have been shown to drive down that risk.
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BUSINESS
January 1, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Zeneca Group and Barr Laboratories Inc. are under investigation by the Justice Department over an agreement that makes them the exclusive U.S. sellers of a popular breast cancer drug. The 1993 accord settled a patent infringement suit filed by Zeneca, the world's second-largest maker of cancer drugs, against generic drug maker Barr. The lawsuit could have invalidated the Zeneca patent, a step that would have made the company vulnerable to competition from other generic drug makers. Antitrust enforcers are "looking at the possibility of anti-competitive practices involving intellectual property rights relating to tamoxifen," Justice Department spokeswoman Gina Talamona said.
HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A drug already used to treat breast cancer can reduce the risk of tumors in high- and moderate-risk post-menopausal women by 65% over a three-year period, researchers reported Saturday. Two other drugs are already approved for reducing the risk of breast tumors in healthy women: Generic tamoxifen reduces the risk by 50% over a five-year period and raloxifene (Evista) reduces the risk by 38% over a similar period. But both drugs are associated with an increased risk of potentially fatal uterine cancer and blood clots.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2008
Taking the breast cancer pill Femara can significantly reduce the chances that a woman's cancer will return, even long after she has stopped taking the estrogen blocker tamoxifen, researchers said in Chicago. They said post-menopausal women who took Femara from one to seven years after finishing a five-year regimen of tamoxifen reduced by 63% the risk the cancer would come back. The study results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
More than 100,000 women each year are diagnosed with a type of breast cancer called postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive -- the most common type of breast cancer. Studies in recent years have shown that an important tool to prevent recurrence of this type of breast cancer lies in the use of medications called aromatase inhibitors. On Monday, cancer experts issued guidelines updating the knowledge about aromatase inhibitors -- which are medications that lower estrogen -- and how women and their doctors should best utilize this class of drugs.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug tamoxifen may stall the progression of non-small cell lung cancer in those who take it after breast cancer treatment, a new study has found. Tamoxifen is the oldest of a wide array of medications that block the action of the hormone estrogen in the body. Researchers have found growing evidence in recent years that the majority of non-small cell lung cancers -- the most common form of lung cancer -- respond to estrogen with growth. So they wondered whether women taking tamoxifen as an adjunct to their breast cancer treatment might be less likely to develop or die of lung cancer.
SCIENCE
September 23, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Women with a higher-than-usual risk for developing breast cancer should consider taking one of two medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration to reduce that risk, a federal panel has concluded. But the medications, which can raise a woman's risk of developing blood clots, are not for everyone and should not be taken for breast cancer reduction by most women, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said. Taken daily by women who are more likely than most to develop breast cancer, the chemotherapy drug tamoxifen or the osteoporosis drug raloxifene have been shown to drive down that risk.
HEALTH
February 5, 2007
Regarding your Jan. 29 article on side effects from breast cancer drugs ["Cancer Drugs: Too Toxic?"], I began taking Arimidex two years ago. Five days after I started the prescription, I woke up in the middle of the night with excruciating pain in my hands. I thought it would diminish over time, but it didn't. The diagnosis, finally? Carpal tunnel syndrome. Surgery was suggested. I had been a legal secretary for more than 30 years, typed five days a week and never got carpal tunnel syndrome.
HEALTH
August 10, 1998 | By Mary Susan Herczog, Special to The Times
If you are lucky, this is the way cancer treatment ends, not with a bang but a whimper. Let's see, of the treatments listed for me in November: chemo--it's done; surgery--done; radiation--done. It remained only to go see my oncologist, Dr. James Waisman, of whom I am preposterously fond, to ask the musical question, "Is that all there is?" And so, it seems, yes. "In my mind"--he nonchalantly shrugged--"you're cured." Oh. Just like that. Is that really all there is?
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug tamoxifen may stall the progression of non-small cell lung cancer in those who take it after breast cancer treatment, a new study has found. Tamoxifen is the oldest of a wide array of medications that block the action of the hormone estrogen in the body. Researchers have found growing evidence in recent years that the majority of non-small cell lung cancers -- the most common form of lung cancer -- respond to estrogen with growth. So they wondered whether women taking tamoxifen as an adjunct to their breast cancer treatment might be less likely to develop or die of lung cancer.
HEALTH
October 4, 2010 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The millions of Americans who take a pill each day to drive down their cholesterol or blood pressure do not generally think of themselves as "sick. " They believe that they are treating one thing ? high cholesterol or blood pressure ? and helping to prevent something worse: a heart attack or stroke. For women who worry about becoming the oft-quoted "1 in 8" who will develop breast cancer in her lifetime, two well-established drugs can do for breast cancer what statins and blood pressure drugs do for heart attacks and strokes: drive down their odds of happening.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
More than 100,000 women each year are diagnosed with a type of breast cancer called postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive -- the most common type of breast cancer. Studies in recent years have shown that an important tool to prevent recurrence of this type of breast cancer lies in the use of medications called aromatase inhibitors. On Monday, cancer experts issued guidelines updating the knowledge about aromatase inhibitors -- which are medications that lower estrogen -- and how women and their doctors should best utilize this class of drugs.
SCIENCE
April 20, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Two drugs taken by women at high risk for breast cancer — tamoxifen and raloxifene — both reduce the risk of the disease by about 50% in high-risk post-menopausal women while they are taking the medications, researchers said Monday. The benefits of raloxifene fall off more quickly once women stop taking them, however, and the increased benefits of tamoxifen come at a price: a higher risk of uterine cancer, blood clots and cataracts — although the absolute risks of all three remain low. "These are relatively inexpensive drugs that reduce breast cancer by about 50% with side effects that are modest," said Dr. Gabriel N. Hortobagyi of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, one of the researchers.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2008
Taking the breast cancer pill Femara can significantly reduce the chances that a woman's cancer will return, even long after she has stopped taking the estrogen blocker tamoxifen, researchers said in Chicago. They said post-menopausal women who took Femara from one to seven years after finishing a five-year regimen of tamoxifen reduced by 63% the risk the cancer would come back. The study results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
HEALTH
February 5, 2007
Regarding your Jan. 29 article on side effects from breast cancer drugs ["Cancer Drugs: Too Toxic?"], I began taking Arimidex two years ago. Five days after I started the prescription, I woke up in the middle of the night with excruciating pain in my hands. I thought it would diminish over time, but it didn't. The diagnosis, finally? Carpal tunnel syndrome. Surgery was suggested. I had been a legal secretary for more than 30 years, typed five days a week and never got carpal tunnel syndrome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1999
Thank you for "Should She Take Tamoxifen?" (Feb. 6). Anya Booker's story touched me deeply. I was 32 years old when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I was a new mother who became afraid to hold her son. I was the wife who feared intimacy. Taking in a deep breath, I embraced the fact that I would get through it all somehow, in spite of my fears. I participated for seven years in the Tamoxifen B-14 clinical trial. I hoped that the research would someday give women like Anya and others faced with their personal decisions about breast cancer another option to consider.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992
In response to "A Travesty at Women's Expense," by Samuel S. Epstein and Susan Rennie, Commentary, June 22: Epstein and Rennie start with an extremely broad and inflammatory statement, "Thousands are to be given a chemotherapy drug as a breast cancer preventive, despite evidence of deadly side effects." This and other extensions of the truth are so numerous in the article that it's difficult to respond to all of them, but let me make the following points. Tamoxifen is not a "chemotherapy drug," it is a hormone.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The osteoporosis drug raloxifene is as effective as the drug now used to prevent breast cancer in high-risk post-menopausal women, but it has a much lower risk of producing life-threatening uterine cancer and blood clots, according to a new government study comparing the two drugs.
NATIONAL
September 2, 2004 | From the Baltimore Sun
After years of controversy over the best way to treat small breast tumors, researchers have found that thousands of older women can forgo radiation treatments without hurting their survival chances. Two studies to be published today in the New England Journal of Medicine found that radiation does not provide any added benefit for women over 70 who receive lumpectomies and take the cancer-fighting drug tamoxifen.
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